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First Year English

Student StudyingFirst Year English

English 101: Critical Reading and Writing I and English 102: Critical Reading and Writing II are a year-long program of study. These courses introduce students to the expectations of informed written response in college coursework across the curriculum and assist students in building the skills necessary to enter into academic conversations via writing. Students in these courses will become familiar with the expectations of proficient college-level writing by: reading complex texts; composing and revising multiple essays; learning about forms of written communication in different academic disciplines; and seeking, evaluating, and synthesizing source material. These courses also provide an introduction to campus resources that support writers in their work (such as the Claire T. Carney Library and the Writing and Reading Center).

Placement

  • During orientation, students take the Accuplacer writing test. This test score places them in a FYE course.
  • We do not accept CLEP credit. Please refer to the Registrar’s Office for information about AP Credit.

English 101

English 101 introduces students to various rhetorical concepts, and emphasizes the importance of writing as a process of communication, learning, and the making of meaning. Throughout the semester, students write and revise multiple drafts of essays and work both individually and collaboratively on topic development and the expansion of ideas. Students also learn how to critique not only the work of published authors, but also the writing of their peers.

Through the processes of writing, revising, and critiquing, students become familiar with the rhetorical contexts of written discourse, particularly those involving audience and purpose. In addition, students are introduced to research methods, library databases, and systems of citation. Students also work together to hone their editing skills, paying attention to both content and clarity.

ENL 101's course objectives

Students in English 101 will learn to:

  • Develop college level writing that addresses needs of audience, situation and purpose.
  • Demonstrate accepted patterns of rhetoric.
  • Summarize, paraphrase, synthesize, and analyze material from sources.
  • Incorporate and accurately document outside sources using proper documentation format.
  • Demonstrate control of syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling.

To obtain these objectives, students in English 101 will:

  • Write and revise five formal essays through the course of the semester. Included in these five may be a sustained metacognitive (or reflective) essay submitted by itself or with a portfolio of writing at the end of the semester (see third item below).
  • Write approximately five pages per week. These five pages will include drafts of the five required formal essays and other kinds of formal or informal writing such as: responses to reading; responses to classmates' essays; brainstorming and invention exercises; writing that reflects on the students' learning and composing; in-class exercises designed to give students practice in various rhetorical skills; writing in response to instructor prompts, journal entries, etc. (not all writing will necessarily be collected and graded by the instructor).
  • Reflect upon and analyze their own writing and their progress as writers, either at intervals throughout the semester, or in a final essay submitted at the end of the semester that analyzes and traces students' development as writers and researchers (see first item above).
  • Meet regularly in the computer facilities to write, research, and respond to each other's writing. read, discuss, and write about assigned essays and other texts.
  • Meet with their instructors in individual conferences at least twice per semester to discuss their writing.
  • Move beyond the five-paragraph essay model they may have used in high school in order to write longer, formal essays that fully develop and support their ideas and arguments.

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English 102

English 102 focuses on writing in the disciplines. By helping students develop and enhance strategies of drafting, revising, critiquing, researching, and editing, English 102 builds on skills already developed in English 101.

Using texts as springboards for their own writing, students learn about the interrelationship of writing with reading.  Students also engage critical reading of various genres and analytic and argumentative writing assignments to enhance their awareness and use of effective language.

ENL 102 course objectives

English 102 students will learn to:

  • Write essays that satisfy the specific needs of audiences in the disciplines of the sciences, social sciences, and humanities.
  • Use the arts of rhetoric in ways that appeal to audiences in different academic discourse communities.
  • Write effective syntheses that demonstrate critical reading.
  • Select, effectively integrate, and document appropriate resource materials from library databases and print holdings.
  • Demonstrate discipline-specific control of language, style, structure, format, syntax, grammar, and mechanics.

To achieve these objectives, students in ENL 102 will:

  • Write and revise five formal essays through the course of the semester.
  • Perform a variety of additional formal and informal writing, including responses to reading; responses to classmates' essays; brainstorming and invention exercises; writing that reflects on the students' learning and composing; in-class exercises designed to give students practice in various rhetorical skills and that allows them to grapple with their reading; writing in response to instructor prompts, journal entries, etc. (not all writing will necessarily be collected and graded by the instructor).
  • Reflect upon and analyze their own writing and their progress as writers at intervals throughout the semester.
  • Write about, rather than be tested on, genres. While instructors may give short quizzes to measure students' understanding of reading and particular terms, writing will supersede testing.
  • Participate in discussion and in-class writing about genres (this is not a lecture course; it is a course in critical writing and reading).
  • Move beyond the five paragraph mode of writing they may have learned in high school in order to develop and sustain ideas and arguments.

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