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Sustainability Studies Current Courses

Current and Upcoming Undergraduate Classes

Click here for Spring 2014 classes

Click here for Fall 2013 classes


Spring 2014 Courses

SUS 101-01 ● Principles of Sustainability

Professor Adam Sulkowski ● MWF 1:00-1:50 PM

3 credits. Fundamental principles of Sustainability. Goal is to provide a larger context for topics covered in sustainability courses. Topics covered include: What is Sustainability?, Climate Change and Environmental Challenges, Systems Thinking/Systems Analysis, "Natural" Systems and Function, Human Interactions with Natural Systems, Ethics, and Values. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 4C.

 

 

SUS 450-01 ● Advanced Seminar in Sustainability Studies

Professor Robert Darst ● MW 3:00-4:15

3 credits. This course will run concurrently with Political Science 390—see description below. Prerequisites: Declaration of Sustainability Studies as a minor or Liberal Arts concentration.

 

 

SUS 450-02 ● Advanced Seminar in Sustainability Studies

Professor Marguerite Zarrillo ● MWF 9:00-9:50

3 credits. This course will run concurrently with Physics 419—see description below. No scientific knowledge is required. Prerequisites: Declaration of Sustainability Studies as a minor or Liberal Arts concentration.

 

 

BNG 162-01 ● Designing a Healthier Planet and its People

Professor Qinguo Fan ● TuTh 12:30-1:45

3 credits. An overview of important areas of bioengineering with a focus on how design can benefit all biological systems spanning from the environment and our planet, to the humans that populate the planet. Topics include how chemistry can help improve energy sources and help decrease the effect of human activities on the environment, how engineering design can improve the health and well being of humans and how government agencies work to regulate these activities in the U.S. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2B

 

 

CEN 304-01 ● Introduction to Environmental Engineering

Professor Chen-Lu Yang ● TuTh 8:00-9:15

3 credits. Introduction to the sanitary engineering field. The environmental problems of urbanization and the natural cycle of water are discussed. Elementary hydrology, physical, chemical and biological principles of the treatment of water and wastewater are covered. Municipal services such as water mains, sanitary sewers and storm water drainage, layout and operation of purification and treatment works are studied in detail. In addition, state and federal regulatory standards are introduced and discussed. Prerequisites: CEN 303 and CHM 152; or permission of instructor. Gen Ed: S.

 

 

IST 444-01 ● Topic in Indic Studies: Sustainable Business in India

Professor Adam Sulkowski ● MWF 11:00-11:50

3 credits. Basics of Indian history, economics, culture, and politics are covered, along with essentials of sustainable business. Case studies of sustainability in India are covered, and students are asked to either imagine their own sustainable business concept or how existing ideas could be expanded or adopted more widely. Prerequisites: None.

 

 

MAR 110-01 ● Natural Hazards and the Ocean

Professor James Bisagni ● TuTh 2:00-3:15

3 credits. Natural Hazards & the Ocean is intended to educate students about the roles of the oceans in such natural hazards as hurricanes, earthquakes, global warming, and tsunamis. The course will address student curiosity about these ocean-related hazards, by presenting a conceptual understanding of the relevant underlying ocean-atmosphere, and earth mediated mechanisms. The students will be presented in lecture and through their readings about how the application of the scientific method (a) overturned historical misunderstandings of Earth geology; (b) explains the far-reaching effects of ocean storm generated waves; (c) relates deep ocean earthquakes to tsunamis; and (d) relates how dust from the North African deserts is related to hurricane generation. Prerequisites: None. Gen Ed: S. University Studies: 2A

 

 

MGT 120 ● Sustainable Entrepreneurship

Professor Adam Sulkowski ● MW 3:00-4:15

3 credits. Based on discussions of real case studies and readings from a conventional text on entrepreneurship, this course reviews current global ecological, economic, and societal crises and then examines how start-up businesses can thrive by solving them. The course includes experiential learning: team action plan projects where students can test their own entrepreneurship skills. What are the biggest entrepreneurial opportunities in the world right now and for the rest of your lifetime, and how can you successfully start-up a company that makes the most of them? Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 4C

 

 

MGT 312 ● The Legal Framework of Business

Professor Richard Golen ● TuTh 8:00-9:15 or TuTh 9:30-10:45

Professor Adam Sulkowski ● MWF 12:00-12:50 or MWF 2:00-2:50

3 credits. The highlights of law school in one semester, plus highlights of sustainable business. Topics related to sustainability include: corporations, law-making, how agencies regulate, and how liability is established when people are hurt. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and declared Sustainability Studies minor. Gen Ed: E. IMPORTANT! Business majors (regardless of specific major) may not count this course toward their Sustainability Studies minor requirements.

 

 

PHY 162-01 ● Science, Technology, & Society: The Environment

Professor John  Silva ● MW 1:00-1:50 + Friday 1:00-1:50, 2:00-2:50, or 3:00-3:50

3 credits. This course studies current environmental issues and their relations to technological choices. For example, air and water quality are examined in relation to the use of various renewable and non-renewable energy resources. The course is non-mathematical. Prerequisites: None. Gen Ed: E, S, or G. University Studies: 2B

 

 

PHY 172-01 ● Planet Earth II

Professor John Silva ● TuTh 3:30-4:45

3 credits. Topics include weathering, mass wasting, groundwater, dug and artesian wells, the hydrologic cycle, mountain development, structure of the ocean floor, shoreline features, coastlines, and the general characteristics of metamorphic, sedimentary and igneous rocks. Students will also engage in weekly laboratory exercises that will produce data and information related to sustainability issues. Prerequisites: None. Gen Ed: S.

 

 

PHY 419-01 ● Advanced Traffic Engineering

Professor Marguerite Zarrillo ● MWF 9:00-9:50

3 credits. Sustainable transportation is an ever increasing concern. The negative impacts of transportation systems on the environment, their carbon footprint and cost on the quality of human life are a growing problem. Yet, mobility is linked to economic development and equal opportunity for all. How our society decides to provide mobility without destroying our planet is a challenge. Providing access to mobility to all our citizens including the elderly, disabled and unemployed in a safe and economically manner is also a challenge. Often forgotten is the objective of providing mobility to our industrial partners who are in need of delivering resources and goods to our citizens. Knowing how to compute capacity is critical to ensuring that future designs in transport systems have increased capacity while maintaining a safe and healthy environment. Prerequisites: None for SUS students—no prior scientific knowledge is required. Ask Professor Zarrillo for a permission number that will allow you to override the formal prerequisites in COIN.

 

 

PSC 251-01 ● World Political Issues & Ideas: The Politics of Everyday Things

Professor Robert Darst ● MWF 1:00-1:50

3 credits. This course explores the political consequences of the everyday things in our lives. Taken individually, our daily decisions about what and how much to consume are of little global import. But when our decisions are added together with those of millions or billions of other people, the consequences are truly momentous: wars are waged to secure access to valuable natural resources; national economies rise and fall; long-established cultural and economic practices are threatened or destroyed; and our planet’s natural environment is irreversibly transformed. What is the origin of the foods that we eat, the clothes and jewelry that we wear, the electronics and appliances that we buy? Where do they go when we dispose of them? And what can we, as consumers, do to alter the political consequences of our daily choices? Prerequisites: None.

 

 

PSC 390-02 ● Current Issues in Politics & Policy: The Politics of Climate Change

Professor Robert Darst ● MW 3:00-4:15

3 credits. The Earth's climate is changing—rapidly. By 2100, according to current estimates, the Earth's average temperature will rise by up to eight degrees (F), and sea levels will rise by as much as three feet, perhaps more. Even if increases of this magnitude are averted or postponed, during your lifetime the planet's climate will undergo a transformation unprecedented in the annals of recorded history. In the process, many of the world's coastal areas (including much of southeastern Massachusetts) will become uninhabitable unless massive engineering is undertaken to protect them, a luxury that many countries cannot afford. Because these changes are driven primarily by human activity, their magnitude and consequences will depend in large part on the actions we take—or fail to take—now. In this course, we will examine the politics of climate change at the global, national, and local levels. Prerequisites: None.

 

 

SOC 381-01 ● Social Impact of Science & Technology 

Professor Yale Magrass ● TuTh 9:30-10:45

3 credits. It would almost impossible to deny that science and its close cousin, technology, are among the most powerful forces shaping modern social life. The word science itself means knowledge and indeed much of modern Western culture virtually equates science with truth. Closely akin to science is technology. Almost all the conveniences of modern life can be attributed to technology, at least in part; however, this same technology has also scattered families and communities, displaced people, concentrated enormous control into relatively few hands, produced weapons of mass destruction, and may destroy the very natural environment upon which life depends. By examining some of the history, philosophy, and sociology of science and technology, the students can assess their role in government, business, and society. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

 


Fall 2013 Courses

 

SUS 101 ● Principles of Sustainability

Professor Chad McGuire ● TuTh 2:00-3:15 PM

3 credits. Fundamental principles of Sustainability. Goal is to provide a larger context for topics covered in sustainability courses. Topics covered include: What is Sustainability?, Climate Change and Environmental Challenges, Systems Thinking/Systems Analysis, "Natural" Systems and Function, Human Interactions with Natural Systems, Ethics, and Values. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 4C.

 

 

SUS 202-01 ● Topics in Sustainability: Campus Biodiversity

Professor Diana Barrett TuTh 12:30-1:45

3 credits. Beyond the Ring Road, the UMD campus is full of fields, forests, streams, and wetlands. Come see what’s living out there in this survey of campus biodiversity. We will identify native and invasive trees, shrubs, and other plants in various community types; look for patterns in soil texture and composition; estimate carbon storage in campus trees; and collect insects with sweep nets and pitfall traps. We will work with a state forester to establish permanent monitoring plots in our forest. Lectures will provide a biological and ecological context for what we find. Students in this class will also complete a project to help describe campus ecosystems and species for the public. Be prepared to go out in fabulous (or lousy) weather, get dirt under your fingernails, handle plants and bugs, and explore parts of campus that most students never see! Prerequisites: None. Gen Ed:  E or G.  University Studies: 4A.

 

 

SUS 450-01 ● Advanced Seminar in Sustainability Studies

Professor Robert Darst ● Tuesday 2:00-4:30

3 credits. During your lifetime the planet's climate will undergo a transformation unprecedented in the annals of recorded history—and the consequences will depend, in part, on the actions we take now. In this course, we will examine the politics and policy of climate action at the global, national, and local levels, and we will put our knowledge to work in the revision of the university's Sustainability Assessment and Climate Action Plan. In the process, you will demonstrate your mastery of energy, land use, and transportation management—skills increasingly demanded by public and private organizations of all types. Prerequisites: declared Sustainability Studies minor.

 


ANT/SOC 367 ● Culture, Power, and Inequality in a Globalized World

Professor Lisa Maya Knauer ● Tuesday 3:30-6:00 PM

3 credits. An exploration of anthropological approaches to globalization, and what globalization means for the future of anthropology. We start with definitions of and theories about globalization, touch upon "the globalization debates," and then turn to case studies of key issues such as gender and sexuality, migration and diaspora, the globalization of culture, the power of commodities, and political activism. Throughout, we will pay close attention to questions of power and inequality - seeing how the impact of globalization is shaped by race, nationality, class, gender and other vectors of difference. Prerequisites: SOC 101 OR ANT 111 OR SOC 113.

 

 

ARH 349 ● The Development of Modern Architecture: Sustainability & Preservation

Professor Pamela Karimi ● MWF 3:00-3:50

3 credits. In this class, we will focus on the past, present, and future of landmarks and architectural heritage of Post-Industrial Cities in the U.S., illuminating the importance of the history and continued survival of these urban centers. Architecture, urban planning, and design will serve as springboards for discussing larger issues regarding the rise and fall and future of these cities.  Although the literature we cover in this class extends beyond Massachusetts, all assignments will focus on the city of New Bedford. The course involves creative and exciting assignments, including photographing and documenting the architectural heritage of New Bedford, making YouTube videos about sustainable environments, and proposing creative ideas to make use of vacant urban lots. The assignments will be constructed to fit each individual student's background and major. Throughout the course, we will meet with members of the New Bedford community and experts in local and non-profit organizations and students will have the opportunity to use local resources to advance their research. Prerequisites: None.

 

 

BIO 112 ● The Ocean Environment

Professor Jefferson Turner ● MWF 8:00-8:50 AM

3 credits. The study of the ocean environment as an integrated ecosystem: the biology of marine organisms and the related physical, chemical, and geological processes of the sea with attention given to the exploitation of marine resources and pollution. Not offered for credit to Biology majors. Prerequisites: None. Gen Ed: S. University Studies: 2A

 

 

CHM 130 ● Chemistry and the Environment

MWF 1:00-1:50 or MWF 3:00-3:50

3 credits. Available to anyone in the university, this course provides substantial treatment, with demonstrations, of the chemistry involved in consumer concerns (food additives, medicines, detergents, etc.), air and water pollution, elementary biochemistry, and the general question of power generation and utilization (fuel cells, solar energy conversion, nuclear energy, etc.). No knowledge of chemistry is assumed, but it is hoped the student will have had high school chemistry or its equivalent. Prerequisites: None. Gen Ed: S. University Studies: 2A

 

 

MAR 110 ● Natural Hazards and the Ocean

Professor Daniel MacDonald ● TuTh 2:00-3:15

3 credits. Natural Hazards & the Ocean is intended to educate students about the roles of the oceans in such natural hazards as hurricanes, earthquakes, global warming, and tsunamis. The course will address student curiosity about these ocean-related hazards, by presenting a conceptual understanding of the relevant underlying ocean-atmosphere, and earth mediated mechanisms. The students will be presented in lecture and through their readings about how the application of the scientific method (a) overturned historical Misunderstandings of Earth geology; (b) explains the far-reaching effects of ocean storm generated waves; (c) relates deep ocean earthquakes to tsunamis; and (d) relates how dust from the North African deserts is related to hurricane generation. Prerequisites: None. Gen Ed: S. University Studies: 2A

 

 

MGT 312 ● The Legal Framework of Business

Professor Richard Golen ● TuTh 8:00-9:15 or TuTh 9:30-10:45

Professor Peter Tashjian ● MWF 8:00-8:50 or MWF 12:00-12:50

3 credits. The highlights of law school in one semester, plus highlights of sustainable business. Topics related to sustainability include: corporations, law-making, how agencies regulate, and how liability is established when people are hurt. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and declared Sustainability Studies minor. Gen Ed: E. IMPORTANT! Business majors (regardless of specific major) may not count this course toward their Sustainability Studies minor requirements.

 

 

PHY 162 ● Science, Technology, & Society: The Environment

Professor John  Silva ● MWF 12:00-12:50

3 credits. This course studies current environmental issues and their relations to technological choices. For example, air and water quality are examined in relation to the use of various renewable and non-renewable energy resources. The course is non-mathematical. Prerequisites: None. Gen Ed: E, S, or G.

 

 

PHY 171 ● Planet Earth I

Professor John Silva ● TuTh 3:30-4:45

3 credits. A course for non-science majors covering Earth's origin and history; composition and structure of its interior, crust, oceans, and atmosphere; plate tectonics and sea floor spreading; seismology, vulcanism and earthquakes; Earth's magnetism; forces shaping Earth's surface, faults and folds, erosion, sedimentation and weathering; and Earth's materials, such as soil, minerals and ores, and igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Prerequisites: None. Gen Ed: S.

 

 

PSC 384 ● International Law & Organization

Professor Robert Darst ● TuTh 11:00-12:15

3 credits. The world today is plagued by a host of problems that are difficult to address without international cooperation: violent conflict, widespread human rights abuses, environmental degradation, infectious disease, and persistent poverty, to name but a few. Yet we live on a planet with no overarching world government capable of providing authoritative solutions to these problems. Instead, international action is limited by the willingness of individual countries to cooperate with one another, and by their ability to control what goes on within their respective borders. We will explore the resulting patchwork quilt of international rules and organizations as they pertain to international security, economic globalization, and climate change. Prerequisite: PSC 161 or permission of instructor. Gen Ed: G.

 

 

PSC 477 ● Topics in International Relations: Climate Action

Professor Robert Darst ● Tuesday 2:00-4:30

3 credits. The Earth's climate is changing—rapidly. By 2100, according to current estimates, the Earth's average temperature will rise by up to 12° F, and sea levels will rise by as much as six feet. Even if increases of this magnitude are averted or postponed, during your lifetime the planet's climate will undergo a transformation unprecedented in the annals of recorded history—and the consequences will depend, in part, on the actions we take now. In this course, we will examine the politics and policy of climate action at the global, national, and local levels, and we will put our knowledge to work in the revision of the university's Climate Action Plan. In the process, you will demonstrate your mastery of energy, land use, and transportation management—skills increasingly demanded by public and private organizations of all types. Prerequisites: None.

 

 

SOC/ANT 350 ● Sustainability in Action

Professor Rachel Kulick ● Wednesday 3:30-6:00

3 credits. This course centers on the frequently, and wildly used terms, "sustainability" and "resiliency" to explore how individuals, groups, and larger communities are actively attempting to create more ecologically, socially, culturally, and economically sustainable systems.  We will pay special attention to the ways that groups attempt to foster justice, equity, and respect for diverse cultures in their everyday practices.  We will look to a variety of media to critically examine expressions of sustainable practices across a wide spectrum including permaculture, urban farming, transition town initiatives, gift economies, and localist movements.  In addition, there will be a hands on dimension through which the class will identify and work on a sustainable action project on campus. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or ANT 111 or SOC 113 or ANT 113, or permission of instructor.


Spring 2013

Course Descriptions

SUS 201-01 ● Principles of Sustainability

Professor: Adam Sulkowski

MWF 1:00-1:50

Textiles 101

3 units. The most important and fun course in your life. Important, because we ask: what are the world's biggest challenges and how big are the stakes? Fun, because we ask: what is sustainability, and what is the relevance of sustainability principles to your life and future career?

Prerequisites: None. Gen Ed: E or G. University Studies: 4C, Nature of the Global Society.


SUS 450-01 ● Advanced Seminar in Sustainability Studies

Professor Tara Rajaniemi

TuTh 11:00-12:15

SENG 210

3 units. SUS 450 is the capstone course for the minor in Sustainability Studies, and is an opportunity to see how the concepts of sustainability play out in the real world.  Students will explore how sustainability principles are being employed on and off campus, through readings and discussions with guest speakers.  In addition, students will integrate and apply what they've learned in previous courses to complete a project that produces real, sustainable change on the UMass Dartmouth campus.  For example, classes in previous years have organized an Earth Day conference and compiled a guide to woody plants on campus.

Prerequisites: 45 credit hours of study; SUS 201, or 202, or 211.


CEN 304-01 ● Introduction to Environmental Engineering

Professor Kelly Pennell

TuTh 8:00-9:15 AM

SENG 113

3 units. Introduction to the sanitary engineering field. The environmental problems of urbanization and the natural cycle of water are discussed. Elementary hydrology, physical, chemical and biological principles of the treatment of water and wastewater are covered. Municipal services such as water mains, sanitary sewers and storm water drainage, layout and operation of purification and treatment works are studied in detail. In addition, state and federal regulatory standards are introduced and discussed.

Prerequisites: CEN 303 and CHM 152; or permission of instructor.

Gen Ed: S.


DES 300-03 ● Designing for the Environment

Professor David Chapman

TuTh 3:30-6:15

CVPA 310 (Tu) & 258 (Th)

3 units. This is a team-based, interdisciplinary workshop for Junior and Senior students in Design, Marketing, and Sustainability Studies. It focuses on developing meaningful and sustainable solutions, for real, community-based projects. It incorporates professional practice, experiential learning, and service learning experiences.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

Gen Ed: C.


EGR 110-01 ● Environmental Science & Business

Professor Qinguo Fan

MWF 3:00-3:50

Textiles 210

3 units. An introductory course pertaining to basic environmental concepts and issues. This course addresses the basic physical science principles and environmental science and technology with topics relevant to understanding the environment, ecosystem, energy use, and the effects of human activities on the environment. The topics include the chemical compositions of air, water and soil, fossil fuels, new energy sources, global warming, organic and inorganic chemicals, toxic pollutants, pollution prevention, waste water treatment, laws and regulations, social and economic effects, and environmental ethics and business.

Prerequisites: None.

Gen Ed: S.

University Studies: 2B, Science in the Engaged Community.


IST 444-01 ● Topic in Indic Studies: Sustainable Entrepreneurship in India

Professor Adam Sulkowski

Wednesday 4:00-6:30

SENG 210

3 units. Basics of Indian history, economics, culture, and politics are covered, along with essentials of sustainable business. Case studies of sustainability in India are covered, and students are asked to either imagine their own sustainable business concept or how existing ideas could be expanded or adopted more widely. 

Prerequisites: None.


MAR 110-01 ● Natural Hazards and the Ocean

Professor James Bisagni

TuTh 2:00-3:15

Dion 110

3 units. Natural Hazards & the Ocean is intended to educate students about the roles of the oceans in such natural hazards as hurricanes, earthquakes, global warming, and tsunamis. The course will address student curiosity about these ocean-related hazards, by presenting a conceptual understanding of the relevant underlying ocean-atmosphere, and earth mediated mechanisms. The students will be presented in lecture and through their readings about how the application of the scientific method (a) overturned historical Misunderstandings of Earth geology; (b) explains the far-reaching effects of ocean storm generated waves; (c) relates deep ocean earthquakes to tsunamis; and (d) relates how dust from the North African deserts is related to hurricane generation.

Prerequisites: None.

Gen Ed: S.


MGT 312 ● The Legal Framework of Business

Professor Adam Sulkowski

Section 03 ● MWF 2:00-2:50, Dion 110

Section 04 ● MW 4:00-5:15, LARTS 217

3 units. The highlights of law school in one semester, plus highlights of sustainable business. Topics related to sustainability include: corporations, law-making, how agencies regulate, and how liability is established when people are hurt.  Prerequisites: Sophomore standing; non-Business students may enroll with permission of instructor.

Gen Ed: E.


PHY 172-01 ● Planet Earth II

Professor John Silva

TuTh 3:30-4:45

Library 205

3 units. Topics include weathering, mass wasting, groundwater, dug and artesian wells, the hydrologic cycle, mountain development, structure of the ocean floor, shoreline features, coastlines, and the general characteristics of metamorphic, sedimentary and igneous rocks. Students will also engage in weekly laboratory exercises that will produce data and information related to sustainability issues.

Prerequisites: None.

Gen Ed: S.


PHY 419-01 ● Advanced Traffic Engineering

Professor Marguerite Zarrillo

MWF 3:00-3:50

SENG 102

3 units. Sustainable transportation is an ever increasing concern. The negative impacts of transportation systems on the environment, their carbon footprint and cost on the quality of human life are a growing problem. Yet, mobility is linked to economic development and equal opportunity for all. How our society decides to provide mobility without destroying our planet is a challenge. Providing access to mobility to all our citizens including the elderly, disabled and unemployed in a safe and economically manner is also a challenge. Often forgotten is the objective of providing mobility to our industrial partners who are in need of delivering resources and goods to our citizens. Knowing how to compute capacity is critical to ensuring that future designs in transport systems have increased capacity while maintaining a safe and healthy environment.

Prerequisites: None for SUS minors. Ask Professor Zarrillo for a permission number that will allow you to override the formal prerequisites in COIN.


SOC 381-01 ● Social Impact of Science & Technology 

Professor Yale Magrass

TuTh 11:00-12:15

LARTS 107

3 units. It would almost impossible to deny that science and its close cousin, technology, are among the most powerful forces shaping modern social life. The word science itself means knowledge and indeed much of modern Western culture virtually equates science with truth. Closely akin to science is technology. Almost all the conveniences of modern life can be attributed to technology, at least in part; however, this same technology has also scattered families and communities, displaced people, concentrated enormous control into relatively few hands, produced weapons of mass destruction, and may destroy the very natural environment upon which life depends. By examining some of the history, philosophy, and sociology of science and technology, the students can assess their role in government, business, and society.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. 


WGS 210-01 ● Topics in Women’s and Gender Studies: Gender, Migration, and Globalization

Professor Kristen McHenry

MWF 10:00-10:50

CVPA 156 

3 units. This course will investigate women’s experiences of globalization. We will ask how globalization shapes women’s lives. By investigating women’s migration patterns, we will analyze the myriad ways women’s labor is crucial to the global economy. As a result we will examine the global exploitation women’s labor in sweatshops, global care chains, and human trafficking through a feminist lens. We will analyze the way militarism and environmental degradation often affects women in detrimental ways. As we examine theories of globalization we will be using feminist critical analysis. We will develop a cross-cultural feminist analysis of women’s reactions and political resistance to globalizing forces. Lastly, we will examine particular cases of women’s resistance to globalization in Peru, Sri Lanka, and the Philippines.

Prerequisites: None.

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