Upcoming Sustainability Courses

Fall 2017 Courses

Summer 2017 Courses
 

Previous Semesters

Spring 2017 Courses

Winter 2017 Courses

Fall 2016 Courses

Summer 2016 Courses

 

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FALL 2017 COURSES

CAS  = College of Arts & Sciences Distribution Requirement; SUS = Sustainability Minor Content Area

Sustainability (SUS) 101 ● Principles of Sustainability

Professor Jerry Blitefield ● MWF 2:00-2:50

Professor Robert Golder ● TuTh 12:30-1:45

3 credits. This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of sustainability. We will examine what it means to live and work “sustainably” from the local to the global level, and we will approach these issues from a wide variety of perspectives. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 4A or 4C. CAS: Social Science.

 

Sustainability (SUS) 202 ● Topics in Sustainability: Sustainable Food

Professor Lydia Silva ● TuTh 11:00-12:15

3 credits. This course takes a whole systems approach to sustainable food production from seed to table. Participants will explore the design of food systems that have the resiliency of natural ecosystems. Students will gain hands-on experience in the Cedar Dell Permaculture Garden and develop designs for sustainable food systems. The essential components of diverse food production systems will be discussed in detail including the environmental, social and economic impacts of sustainable food and farming. Note: SUS 202 may be repeated for credit with a change in topic. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 4A. CAS: Social Science.

 

Sustainability (SUS) 350 ● Advanced Topics in Sustainability

Multiple sections. For days/times and course information, see descriptions below for:

English 357

Political Science 313

Political Science 381

Sociology & Anthropology 386

 

Art History (ARH) 322 ● Art of the City

Professor Anna Dempsey ● TuTh 11:00-12:15

3 credits. Our cities, which provide us with basic shelter and community, have also been a source of great inspiration.  To the ancient Greeks, the public square was the communal heart of the city, and the space where democracy was born.  For artists of the last one hundred and fifty years, urban space has functioned as either the site of modernity and progress, or as the site of decay and decadence (as in Blade Runner, Akira, or American film noir).  More recently, artists have responded to urban and environmental decay and created work to catalyze communities to into action and foster urban “rebirths.” In this class, we will learn how artwork—from painting to public sculptures and site-specific installations—can affect and change the urban experience.  In particular, we will focus on recent artistic interventions that foster cultural and environmental regeneration. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 3B. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Art History (ARH) 349 ● Architecture and Sustainability in American Post-Industrial Cities

Professor Pamela Karimi ● TuTh 2:00-3:15

3 credits. In this class, we will focus on the past, present, and future of landmarks and architectural heritage of Post-Industrial Cities in the U.S., illuminating the importance of the history and continued survival of these urban centers. Architecture, urban planning, and design will serve as springboards for discussing larger issues regarding the rise and fall and future of these cities.  Although the literature we cover in this class extends beyond Massachusetts, all assignments will focus on the city of New Bedford. The course involves creative and exciting assignments, including photographing and documenting the architectural heritage of New Bedford, making YouTube videos about sustainable environments, and proposing creative ideas to make use of vacant urban lots. The assignments will be constructed to fit each individual student's background and major. Throughout the course, we will meet with members of the New Bedford community and experts in local and non-profit organizations. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 5B and either 3B or 4B. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Biology (BIO) 112 ● The Ocean Environment

Professor Jefferson Turner ● MWF 8:00-8:50

3 credits. The study of the ocean environment as an integrated ecosystem: the biology of marine organisms and the related physical, chemical, and geological processes of the sea with attention given to the exploitation of marine resources and pollution. Not offered for credit to Biology majors. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2A. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Biology (BIO) 143 ● Ecology and Environmental Issues

Professor Tara Rajaniemi ● MWF 4:00-4:50

3 credits. The science of ecology as it applies to major environmental issues. Principles of population, community, and ecosystem ecology will be introduced in the context of such problems as invasive species and global climate change. Students will also learn and apply the scientific method through readings, discussion, and on-campus field research. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2B. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Biology (BIO) 499-01 ● Capstone Seminar: Biodiversity in a Changing World

Professor Tara Rajaniemi ● Tuesday 2:00-5:00

3 credits. The earth is currently experiencing its sixth mass extinction event. The major causes of species loss can all be traced back to humans and are summarized by the acronym HIPPCO: habitat modification, invasive species, population growth, pollution, climate change, and overexploitation. Students in this capstone section will explore the primary literature to generate hypotheses about specific changes in species distributions, phenology, interactions, and diversity in response to human impacts. These hypotheses will then be tested using published data sets. Students will present their results to Biology Department faculty and students in a professional-style poster symposium at the end of the semester as well as in a blog posting for the general public. Prerequisite: Biology majors only. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Chemistry (CHM) 130 ● Chemistry and the Environment

Professor Smita Bala ● MWF 1:00-1:50

3 credits. Available to anyone in the university, this course provides substantial treatment, with demonstrations, of the chemistry involved in consumer concerns (food additives, medicines, detergents, etc.), air and water pollution, elementary biochemistry, and the general question of power generation and utilization (fuel cells, solar energy conversion, nuclear energy, etc.). No knowledge of chemistry is assumed, but it is hoped the student will have had high school chemistry or its equivalent. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2A. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Economics (ECO) 107 ● Economics of Pollution

Professor Randall Hall ● MWF 12:00-12:50 or MWF 2:00-2:50

3 credits. Pollution is a basic problem faced by all societies and cultures and the response or lack of response to this problem will certainly shape societies globally.  Because of their inherent externalities, pollution problems can seldom be solved by one nation acting on their own. Through our course’s theories, news articles, and in-class games and simulations, students will discover that the problems and solutions of environmental economics are often best addressed through the lens of the world as a whole. Students will discuss and debate different national, social, and cultural perspectives on pollution and the global environment, and examine the potential role they have as members of a global society. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 4C. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Engineering (EGR) 303 ● Engineering Economics

Professor Jeffrey Beaudry ● TuTh 8:00-9:15

Instructor TBD ● TuTh 11:00-12:15

3 credits. Concepts and methods of engineering economics for decision making in engineering. Introduction of common methods of present worth analysis, rate of return, replacement analysis, and decision making under risk. Market evaluation of technology in competitive world markets including technological change, the environment, public goods and governmental trade policies. Prerequisite: Students in the College of Engineering only. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

English (ENL) 357 ● Special Topics in Rhetorical Studies: Environmental Communication

Professor Jerry Blitefield ● MWF 1:00-1:50

3 credits. This course will examine the various ways individuals and groups communicate about the environment for public understanding. Much of our focus will attend to the strategies environmental activists deploy to craft messages for increasing membership and public support. Prerequisite: ENL major/minor or permission of instructor. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Management (MGT) 312 ● The Legal Framework of Business

Multiple sections and instructors: see COIN

3 credits. The highlights of law school in one semester, plus highlights of sustainable business. Topics related to sustainability include: corporations, law-making, how agencies regulate, and how liability is established when people are hurt. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and declared Sustainability Studies minor. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Marine Science (MAR) 110 ● Natural Hazards and the Ocean

Professor Wendell Brown ● TuTh 2:00-3:15

3 credits. Natural Hazards & the Ocean is intended to educate students about the roles of the oceans in such natural hazards as hurricanes, earthquakes, global warming, and tsunamis. The course will address student curiosity about these ocean-related hazards, by presenting a conceptual understanding of the relevant underlying ocean-atmosphere, and earth mediated mechanisms. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2A. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Mechanical Engineering (MNE) 422 ● Energy Conversion

Professor Sankha Bhowmick ● MWF 9:00-9:50

3 credits. An introduction to various energy resources, followed by a description of the use of chemical potential energy, nuclear energy and solar energy, the analysis and design criteria for various energy conversion devices, such as generators, transformers, motors, power distribution systems, solar cells, and so on. Understanding of working principles and essential design conditions is emphasized. Prerequisite: MNE 332. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Physics (PHY) 162 ● Science, Technology, & Society II: The Environment

Professor John Silva ● MWF 12:00-12:50 PM

3 credits. This course studies current environmental issues and their relations to technological choices. For example, air and water quality are examined in relation to the use of various renewable and non-renewable energy resources. The course is non-mathematical. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2B. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Physics (PHY) 171 ● Planet Earth I

Professor John Silva ● TuTh 3:30-4:45

3 credits. A course for non-science majors covering Earth's origin and history; composition and structure of its interior, crust, oceans, and atmosphere; plate tectonics and sea floor spreading; seismology, vulcanism and earthquakes; Earth's magnetism; forces shaping Earth's surface, faults and folds, erosion, sedimentation and weathering; and Earth's materials, such as soil, minerals and ores, and igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2A. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Political Science (PSC) 313 ● Urban Politics

Professor David Prentiss ● Monday 5:00-7:30

3 credits. An examination of the challenges of addressing issues and getting things done in an urban context. Topics include the dynamics of city politics, policing practices and the nature of the criminal justice system, business environment and strategies for economic development, and public education reform. The course will have a strong focus on the practical politics and real-life experiences of dealing with these issues. Prerequisites: PSC 101 or junior standing or permission of instructor. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Political Science (PSC) 381 ● Topics in International Relations: Arctic Policy

Professor Melissa Freitag ● TuTh 2:00-3:15

3 credits. Arctic Policy will present students with an introduction to realities in the Arctic in an age of rapid climate change.  Students will explore and examine the warming Arctic region and its still-developing public policy in an interdisciplinary manner, from polar bears, melting ice and indigenous peoples, to the Arctic Council, ICBMs, and nuclear submarines.  The course will begin with an introduction to the geography and peoples of the region, and then focus upon multi-disciplinary US policy, international organization and cooperation, security studies, maritime/marine issues, and the environment. Note: PSC 381 may be repeated for credit with a change of topic. Perequisite: Junior standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Sociology & Anthropology (SOA) 211 ● Thinking through Writing in Sociology and Anthropology: Environmental Justice

Professor Lisa Maya Knauer ● TuTh 12:30-1:45

3 credits. This class sharpens students' critical reading, research and writing skills through an introduction to theories of, and movements for, environmental justice. We will use historical and cross cultural perspectives to examine how environmental inequalities have affected communities across the globe, and those communities’ responses. Readings will highlight the voices and experiences of peoples affected by environmental injustices. This class fulfills university studies Intermediate Writing requirements, so students will be exposed to several kinds of writing assignments in the social sciences. Prerequisite: SOA major or permission of instructor. University Studies: 1C. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Sociology & Anthropology (SOA) 381 ● Social Impact of Science & Technology 

Professor Yale Magrass ● MWF 2:00-2:50

3 credits. It would almost impossible to deny that science and its close cousin, technology, are among the most powerful forces shaping modern social life. The word science itself means knowledge and indeed much of modern Western culture virtually equates science with truth. Closely akin to science is technology. Almost all the conveniences of modern life can be attributed to technology, at least in part; however, this same technology has also scattered families and communities, displaced people, concentrated enormous control into relatively few hands, produced weapons of mass destruction, and may destroy the very natural environment upon which life depends. By examining some of the history, philosophy, and sociology of science and technology, the students can assess their role in government, business, and society. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Sociology & Anthropology (SOA) 386 ● Sustainability in Action

Professor Rachel Kulick ● TuTh 11:00-12:15

3 credits. This course centers on the frequently used terms "sustainability" and "resiliency" to explore how individuals, groups, and larger communities are actively attempting to create more ecologically, socially, culturally, and economically sustainable systems.  We will pay special attention to the ways that groups attempt to foster justice, equity, and respect for diverse cultures in their everyday practices.  We will look to a variety of media to critically examine expressions of sustainable practices across a wide spectrum including permaculture, urban farming, transition town initiatives, gift economies, and localist movements.  Prerequisite: SOC 101 or ANT 111 or SOC 113 or ANT 113 or permission of instructor. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Sociology & Anthropology (SOA) 420 ● Senior Seminar: Commodities & Colonialism

Professor Lisa Maya Knauer ● Tuesday 3:30-6:00

3 credits. Prerequisite: SOA major or permission of instructor. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Urban Studies (URB) 201 ● City Life: Introduction to Urban Studies

Professor Maria Gloria de Sa ● TuTh 9:30-10:45

3 credits. This course will introduce you to the ways in which scholars and activists from a range of different disciplines investigate the history, culture and social dynamics of American cities.  We will engage with key debates about how to foster socially just access to resources, opportunities, and quality of life for all urban residents and how to help make our cities of the future environmentally and socially sustainable. It will also introduce you to UMass Dartmouth faculty from across the campus who are working on urban-related research. We will explore various facets of urban life and examine ways to promote the social, cultural, and economic vibrancy of cities in our region as well as in wider national and global contexts. Prerequisite: ENL 101. University Studies: 4B. CAS: Humanities or Social Science (but not both). SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

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SUMMER 2017 COURSES

CAS  = College of Arts & Sciences Distribution Requirement; SUS = Sustainability Minor Content Area

Fine Arts 223 ● Nature Drawing I

Professor Andrew Nixon ● Maymester (May 22-June 5)

3 credits. An intensive two-week plein air painting and drawing course centered on the local south coast landscape. Most class time will be spent outdoors at the Slocum River Reserve near campus, and amid the surrounding rivers, hills and coastline of Dartmouth and Westport. Students will be introduced to a variety of approaches and media and encouraged to extend their drawing and painting studies through variations on a single subject. An important part of the course will be an examination of the role that working in the south coast has played in the careers of artists of the American landscape tradition, such as Martin Johnson Heade, Albert Pinkham Ryder, and John Fredrick Kensett. Field trips to the RISD Museum and the Newport Art Museum to examine artworks and their connection to place will also be an important part of the course. Reliable personal transportation each day is required. Prerequisites: None. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Fine Arts 224 ● Nature Drawing II

Professor Andrew Nixon ● Maymester (May 22-June 5)

3 credits. An intensive two-week plein air painting and drawing course centered on the local south coast landscape. Most class time will be spent outdoors at the Slocum River Reserve near campus, and amid the surrounding rivers, hills and coastline of Dartmouth and Westport. Students will be introduced to a variety of approaches and media and encouraged to extend their drawing and painting studies through variations on a single subject. An important part of the course will be an examination of the role that working in the south coast has played in the careers of artists of the American landscape tradition, such as Martin Johnson Heade, Albert Pinkham Ryder, and John Fredrick Kensett. Field trips to the RISD Museum and the Newport Art Museum to examine artworks and their connection to place will also be an important part of the course. Reliable personal transportation each day is required. Color media are used in Nature Drawing II. Prerequisites: None. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Political Science 347 ● Environmental Law

Professor Chad McGuire ● Maymester (May 22-June 5), Online

3 credits. Introduction to the concepts surrounding environmental law. Students explore the reasons, development, and implementation of environmental laws. Areas of focus include the following: using the law to consider environmental impacts before taking action; using the law to protect water and air quality; the law of land use; and global applications of legal frameworks to deal with large scale environmental problems like climate change. Prerequisite: Junior standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Sociology & Anthropology 334 ● Food, Feast & Famine

Professor Kathryn Caldera ● June 13-July 13, Online

3 credits. Throughout human evolution, knowledge about food gathering, food production, and food choices have been an inherent part of individual and cultural sustainability.  Food has always mediated cultural, political, and economic transactions. Paradoxically, while food production has increased dramatically in the last decades, the common citizen is largely ignorant about food systems. Furthermore, food insecurity remains a reality in both the industrialized and non-industrialized worlds. This course addresses these paradoxes as well as the role of food in both sustaining and undermining social and cultural identities. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Sociology & Anthropology 350 ● Maritime Communities

Professor Stephen Cabral ● June 19-August 8

3 credits. Prerequisite: SOA 101 or SOA 111 or SOA 113. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Sociology & Anthropology (SOA) 381 ● Social Impact of Science & Technology 

Professor Jean Robertson ● July 18-August 16, Online

3 credits. It would almost impossible to deny that science and its close cousin, technology, are among the most powerful forces shaping modern social life. The word science itself means knowledge and indeed much of modern Western culture virtually equates science with truth. Closely akin to science is technology. Almost all the conveniences of modern life can be attributed to technology, at least in part; however, this same technology has also scattered families and communities, displaced people, concentrated enormous control into relatively few hands, produced weapons of mass destruction, and may destroy the very natural environment upon which life depends. By examining some of the history, philosophy, and sociology of science and technology, the students can assess their role in government, business, and society. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

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SPRING 2017 COURSES

CAS  = College of Arts & Sciences Distribution Requirement; SUS = Sustainability Minor Content Area

 

Sustainability (SUS) 101 ● Principles of Sustainability

Professor Robert Golder ● TuTh 2:00-3:15 (Section 01)

Professor Lydia Silva ● TuTh 12:30-1:45 (Section 02)

Professor Jerrold Blitefield ● TuTh 11:00-12:15 (Section 03)

3 credits. Fundamental principles of sustainability. The goal is to provide a larger context for topics covered in sustainability courses. Topics covered include: What is Sustainability?, Climate Change and Environmental Challenges, Systems Thinking/Systems Analysis, "Natural" Systems and Function, Human Interactions with Natural Systems, Ethics, and Values. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 4A or 4C. CAS: Social Science

 

Bioengineering (BNG) 162 ● Designing a Healthier Planet and its People

Professor Prathyushakrishna Macha ● TuTh 12:30-1:45

3 credits. An overview of important areas of bioengineering with a focus on how design can benefit all biological systems spanning from the environment and our planet, to the humans that populate the planet. Topics include how chemistry can help improve energy sources and help decrease the effect of human activities on the environment, how engineering design can improve the health and well-being of humans, and how government agencies work to regulate these activities in the U.S. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2B. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Biology (BIO) 314 ● General Ecology

Professor Nancy O’Connor ● MWF 10:00-10:50 + Wednesday 2:00-4:45

4 credits. The principles and practices of the scientific discipline of ecology. Interactions among organisms and between organisms and their environment will be emphasized. Interactions will be described and analyzed at the organismal, population, community, and ecosystem levels. In the laboratory, students will use hypothesis-testing and experimentation to examine theoretical and empirical aspects of ecology. Prerequisites: This course is restricted to Biology majors who have completed BIO 121, 122, 210, and 234. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Biology (BIO) 402 ● Community Ecology

Professor Tara Rajaniemi ● TuTh 12:30-1:45

3 credits. Community ecology seeks to explain patterns in biodiversity: how many species, and which species, are found in a given environment.  Explaining these patterns requires an understanding of how pairs of species interact with each other, how those pairwise interactions scale up to structure larger groups of species, and how species pairs and groups respond to the physical environment.  This course will address these questions by exploring conceptual frameworks of communities, mathematical models, foundational publications in the field, and current research. Prerequisites: This course is restricted to Biology majors who have completed BIO 121, 122, 210, and 234. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEN) 304 ● Introduction to Environmental Engineering

Professor Amir Taghavy ● MWF 9:00-9:50

3 credits. Introduction to the sanitary engineering field. The environmental problems of urbanization and the natural cycle of water are discussed. Elementary hydrology, physical, chemical and biological principles of the treatment of water and wastewater are covered. Municipal services such as water mains, sanitary sewers and storm water drainage, layout and operation of purification and treatment works are studied in detail. In addition, state and federal regulatory standards are introduced and discussed. Prerequisites: CEN 303 and CHM 152; or permission of instructor. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEN) 325 ● Water Resources Engineering

Professor Neil Fennessey ● TuTh 9:30-10:45

3 credits. Elementary surface and groundwater hydrology, pressure flow and open channel flow fundamentals. Topics include basic probability and statistics with a water resources emphasis, watershed based and site drainage concepts, natural and constructed open channel systems, reservoir routing and design, analysis and management issues. Also covered are the analysis and design of pressure flow systems, dam spillways, energy dissipaters and stilling basins. An integrated, systems analyses approach to water resources engineering is emphasized. Prerequisite: CEN 303. Corequisite: CEN 313. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEN) 430 ● Topics in CEN: Atmosphere & Environment

Professor Amit Tandon ● TuTh 6:30-7:45

3 credits. Understanding the weather and climate requires quantitative understanding of the dynamics that govern the atmosphere at global scales. This course is about the science and dynamics of the atmosphere around us. What is the structure of the atmosphere: vertically, meridionally, and what makes it change on slow and fast time scales? What makes this course special is linking the scientific concepts with in-class demonstrations. These will be connected to observations. Prerequisite: MTH 213 or MTH 211 or equivalent. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Economics (ECO) 107 ● Economics of Pollution

Professor Randall Hall ● MWF 9:00-9:50 (Section 01) or MWF 3:00-3:50 (Section 02)

3 credits. Pollution is a basic problem faced by all societies and cultures and the response or lack of response to this problem will certainly shape societies globally.  Because of their inherent externalities, pollution problems can seldom be solved by one nation acting on their own. Through our course’s theories, news articles, and in-class games and simulations, students will discover that the problems and solutions of environmental economics are often best addressed through the lens of the world as a whole. Students will discuss and debate different national, social, and cultural perspectives on pollution and the global environment, and examine the potential role they have as members of a global society. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 4C. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Economics (ECO) 461 ● Urban Economics

Professor Sarah Cosgrove ● TuTh 9:30-10:45

3 credits. Urban economics is the study of the why and where households and firms choose to locate and the issues that result from these decisions. In this course, we will learn why cities exist and why firms tend to locate near each other. We will also investigate the economics of cities including their sizes, growth patterns, and land-use patterns. Other key topics of discussion will be transportation, crime, and housing in cities. Prerequisite: ECO 231 & 232, or permission of instructor. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy. Note: This course must be "contracted" for Sustainability credit via agreement with the instructor.

 

Management (MGT) 312 ● The Legal Framework of Business

Multiple sections and instructors: See COIN

3 credits. The highlights of law school in one semester, plus highlights of sustainable business. Topics related to sustainability include: corporations, law-making, how agencies regulate, and how liability is established when people are hurt. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and declared Sustainability Studies minor. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Marine Science (MAR) 115 ● Introduction to Climate Sciences

Professor Avijit Gangopadhyay ● TuTh 2:00-3:15

3 credits. As part of this course, students will explore a variety of topics, including the effects of acid rain, the greenhouse effect as related to carbon footprint (e.g., the amount of carbon dioxide and other carbon compounds emitted due to the consumption of fossil fuels based on human activity), how warmer air and surface temperatures (brought on by climate change) impact corals and alter coral reef environments, and how global sea level rise might affect our coastal megacities. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2B. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Mechanical Engineering (MNE) 490-01 ● Special Topics: Ocean Wave Energy Conversion

Professor Mehdi Raessi ● MW 3:00-4:15

3 credits. Surface waves; wave modification; basic and advanced wave energy conversion techniques; energy conversion, transmission, and storage; environmental and mooring considerations. Prerequisites: MNE 332 and EGR 301. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Mechanical Engineering (MNE) 490-04 ● Atmosphere & Environment

Professor Amit Tandon ● TuTh 6:30-7:45

3 credits. Understanding the weather and climate requires quantitative understanding of the dynamics that govern the atmosphere at global scales. This course is about the science and dynamics of the atmosphere around us. What is the structure of the atmosphere: vertically, meridionally, and what makes it change on slow and fast time scales? What makes this course special is linking the scientific concepts with in-class demonstrations. These will be connected to observations. Prerequisite: MTH 213 or MTH 211 or equivalent. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Philosophy (PHL) 307 ● Ecofeminism:  Theory & Practice

Professor Catherine Gardner ● Tuesday 3:30-6:00

3 credits. Study of ecofeminism as systems of oppressions based on race, class, gender, sexuality, and ethnicity that stem from a cultural ideology that enables the oppression of nature. The course explores ecofeminist theories, literature, and practice, including ecofeminist ethics, and the applications of ecofeminism to the lives of individual men and women, as well as cultural institutions and organizations. Prerequisites: None. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Philosophy (PHL) 341 ● Philosophy of the Good Life

Professor Jennifer Mulnix ● ONLINE

3 credits. Exploration of the nature of the good life. This course surveys historical and contemporary concepts of well-being as well as how these concepts relate to theories of happiness and theories of morality. The relationship between well-being and political and economic policy will also be examined from both a philosophical and scientific perspective. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 4C. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Physics (PHY) 162 ● Science, Technology, & Society: The Environment

Professor John Silva ● MWF 1:00-1:50

3 credits. This course studies current environmental issues and their relations to technological choices. For example, air and water quality are examined in relation to the use of various renewable and non-renewable energy resources. The course is non-mathematical. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2B. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Political Science (PSC) 313 ● Urban Politics

Professor David Prentiss ● ONLINE

3 credits. An examination of the challenges of addressing issues and getting things done in an urban context. Topics include the dynamics of city politics, policing practices and the nature of the criminal justice system, business environment and strategies for economic development, and public education reform. The course will have a strong focus on the practical politics and real-life experiences of dealing with these issues. Prerequisites: PSC 101 or junior standing or permission of instructor. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Political Science (PSC) 381 ● Topics in International Relations: The Politics of Animals

Professor Robert Darst ● TuTh 2:00-3:15

3 credits. The Earth's 7.5 billion humans coexist with 20 billion billion other animals. Most of these are members of wild species, but even domesticated animals dwarf the human population: the number of chickens alone exceeds 20 billion. Our fellow Earthlings intersect with our lives and politics in widely divergent ways: some we keep as pets, and some we keep in captivity; some we venerate, and some we eat; some we seek to exterminate, and some we seek to protect. In this course, we will examine the political conflicts that arise from our relationships with other animals. Cases will include the protection of endangered species, whaling, pest eradication, feral animals, animal captivity, genetic engineering, and meat consumption. You will select one species for closer examination, and at the end of the semester you will share your findings with the class. Prerequisites: None. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Sociology & Anthropology (SOA) 338 ● Population, Environment and  Culture

Professor Jacob Oni ● ONLINE

3 credits. Explores vital events in human life such as when and who we marry and sometimes divorce, how we pace and stop childbearing, and why and when we die. Fundamental questions include how the adoption of agriculture, changing patterns of disease, industrialization, urbanization, and international migration have shaped the human lifespan, fertility and health. The course will also examine the impact of consumption on environmental degradation and different paths to sustainability. Prerequisite: SOA 101 or SOA 111 or SOA 113 or permission of instructor. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Sociology & Anthropology (SOA) 381 ● Social Impact of Science & Technology 

Professor Yale Magrass ● TuTh 12:30-1:45

3 credits. It would almost impossible to deny that science and its close cousin, technology, are among the most powerful forces shaping modern social life. The word science itself means knowledge and indeed much of modern Western culture virtually equates science with truth. Closely akin to science is technology. Almost all the conveniences of modern life can be attributed to technology, at least in part; however, this same technology has also scattered families and communities, displaced people, concentrated enormous control into relatively few hands, produced weapons of mass destruction, and may destroy the very natural environment upon which life depends. By examining some of the history, philosophy, and sociology of science and technology, the students can assess their role in government, business, and society. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Sociology & Anthropology (SOA) 367 ● Culture, Power, and Inequality in a Globalized World

Professor Lisa Knauer ● TuTh 2:00-4:30

3 credits. An exploration of anthropological approaches to globalization, and what globalization means for the future of anthropology. We start with definitions of and theories about globalization, touch upon "the globalization debates," and then turn to case studies of key issues such as gender and sexuality, migration and diaspora, the globalization of culture, the power of commodities, and political activism. Throughout, we will pay close attention to questions of power and inequality, seeing how the impact of globalization is shaped by race, nationality, class, gender and other vectors of difference. Prerequisites: SOA 101 or SOA 111 or SOA 113. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Sustainability (SUS) 350 ● Population, Environment and  Culture

Professor Jacob Oni ● ONLINE

3 credits. Explores vital events in human life such as when and who we marry and sometimes divorce, how we pace and stop childbearing, and why and when we die. Fundamental questions include how the adoption of agriculture, changing patterns of disease, industrialization, urbanization, and international migration have shaped the human lifespan, fertility and health. The course will also examine the impact of consumption on environmental degradation and different paths to sustainability. Prerequisite: SUS 101 or SUS 201 or SUS 202. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Urban Studies 201 ● City Life: Introduction to Urban Studies

Professor Mark Santow ● TuTh 12:30-1:45

3 credits. This course will introduce you to the ways in which scholars and activists from a range of different disciplines investigate the history, culture and social dynamics of American cities.  We will engage with key debates about how to foster socially just access to resources, opportunities, and quality of life for all urban residents and how to help make our cities of the future environmentally and socially sustainable. It will also introduce you to UMass Dartmouth faculty from across the campus who are working on urban-related research. We will explore various facets of urban life and examine ways to promote the social, cultural, and economic vibrancy of cities in our region as well as in wider national and global contexts. Prerequisite: ENL 101. University Studies: 4B. CAS: Humanities or Social Science (but not both). SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Women's & Gender Studies (WGS) 307 ● Ecofeminism:  Theory & Practice

Professor Catherine Gardner ● Tuesday 3:30-6:00

3 credits. Study of ecofeminism as systems of oppressions based on race, class, gender, sexuality, and ethnicity that stem from a cultural ideology that enables the oppression of nature. The course explores ecofeminist theories, literature, and practice, including ecofeminist ethics, and the applications of ecofeminism to the lives of individual men and women, as well as cultural institutions and organizations. Prerequisites: None. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

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WINTER 2017 COURSES

Political Science (PSC) 347 ● Environmental Law

Professor Chad McGuire ● Online

3 credits. Introduction to the concepts surrounding environmental law. Students explore the reasons, development, and implementation of environmental laws. Areas of focus include the following: using the law to consider environmental impacts before taking action; using the law to protect water and air quality; the law of land use; and global applications of legal frameworks to deal with large scale environmental problems like climate change. Prerequisite: Junior standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Sociology & Anthropology 334 ● Food, Feast, and Famine

Professor Kathryn Caldera ● Online

3 credits. A look at ancient and modern food production and its environmental impact. Diet and nutrition; population pressure and hunger; the politics of food; and, modern food processing and its implications are all subjects of study. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

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FALL 2016 COURSES

CAS  = College of Arts & Sciences Distribution Requirement; SUS = Sustainability Minor Content Area

Note: For courses marked with an asterisk (*), students wishing to earn credit toward the minor must agree to choose sustainability-related topics for the course assignments, where appropriate, in consultation with the instructor.

 

Sustainability 101 ● Principles of Sustainability

Professor Jerry Blitefield ● MWF 2:00-2:50 (Section 01)

Professor Robert Golden ● TuTh 11:00-12:15 (Section 02)

3 credits. This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of sustainability. We will examine what it means to live and work “sustainably” from the local to the global level, and we will approach these issues from a wide variety of perspectives. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 4A or 4C. CAS: Social Science.

 

Biology 112 ● The Ocean Environment

Professor Jefferson Turner ● MWF 8:00-8:50

3 credits. The study of the ocean environment as an integrated ecosystem: the biology of marine organisms and the related physical, chemical, and geological processes of the sea with attention given to the exploitation of marine resources and pollution. Not offered for credit to Biology majors. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2A. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Biology 143 ● Ecology and Environmental Issues

Professor Tara Rajaniemi ● MWF 12:00-12:50

3 credits. The science of ecology as it applies to major environmental issues. Principles of population, community, and ecosystem ecology will be introduced in the context of such problems as invasive species and global climate change. Students will also learn and apply the scientific method through readings, discussion, and on-campus field research. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2B. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Chemistry 130 ● Chemistry and the Environment

Professor Smita Bala ● MWF 1:00-1:50 or MWF 3:00-3:50

3 credits. Available to anyone in the university, this course provides substantial treatment, with demonstrations, of the chemistry involved in consumer concerns (food additives, medicines, detergents, etc.), air and water pollution, elementary biochemistry, and the general question of power generation and utilization (fuel cells, solar energy conversion, nuclear energy, etc.). No knowledge of chemistry is assumed, but it is hoped the student will have had high school chemistry or its equivalent. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2A. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Economics (ECO) 107 ● Economics of Pollution

Professor Randall Hall ● MWF 12:00-12:50 (Section 01) or MWF 2:00-2:50 (Section 02)

3 credits. Pollution is a basic problem faced by all societies and cultures and the response or lack of response to this problem will certainly shape societies globally.  Because of their inherent externalities, pollution problems can seldom be solved by one nation acting on their own. Through our course’s theories, news articles, and in-class games and simulations, students will discover that the problems and solutions of environmental economics are often best addressed through the lens of the world as a whole. Students will discuss and debate different national, social, and cultural perspectives on pollution and the global environment, and examine the potential role they have as members of a global society. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 4C. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Engineering 303 ● Engineering Economics

Professor Farhad Azadivar ● TuTh 11:00-12:15

3 credits. Concepts and methods of engineering economics for decision making in engineering. Introduction of common methods of present worth analysis, rate of return, replacement analysis, and decision making under risk. Market evaluation of technology in competitive world markets including technological change, the environment, public goods and governmental trade policies. Prerequisite: Students in the College of Engineering only. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

History 314 ● History of Urban America*

Professor Mark Santow ● TuTh 11:00-12:15

3 credits. Examines the history of the American city - its people, its culture, and its politics. The course examines why cities look the way they do, and why cities are disproportionately poor and minority, while suburbs are not. Students consider such questions as: Are cities are in crisis? Can - and should - they be saved? The course looks at why cities are the way they are, and whether they still matter in an increasingly suburban nation. The course will also consider how these larger issues apply to nearby cities, such as New Bedford, Fall River, and Providence. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Management 312 ● The Legal Framework of Business

Professor William Camara ● TuTh 3:30-4:45 (Section 01)

Professor Joseph Accetturo ● Tuesday 6:30-9:30 (Section 02) or Thursday 6:30-9:30 (Section 03)

Professor Michael Levinson ● MWF 1:00-1:50 (Section 04/05H)

3 credits. The highlights of law school in one semester, plus highlights of sustainable business. Topics related to sustainability include: corporations, law-making, how agencies regulate, and how liability is established when people are hurt. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and declared Sustainability Studies minor. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Mechanical Engineering 437 ● Fuel Cells

Professor Sankha Bhowmick ● MWF 9:00-9:50

3 credits. Fundamental engineering principles of fuel cells. Thermodynamics, Reaction Kinetics, Charge and Mass Transport associated with fuel cells will be developed. Characteristics performance evaluation of fuel cells will be discussed. This will be followed by analysis of various types of fuel cells. Prerequisite: MNE 220. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Physics 162 ● Science, Technology, & Society II: The Environment

Professor John Silva ● MWF 12:00-12:50 PM

3 credits. This course studies current environmental issues and their relations to technological choices. For example, air and water quality are examined in relation to the use of various renewable and non-renewable energy resources. The course is non-mathematical. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2B. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Physics 171 ● Planet Earth I

Professor John Silva ● TuTh 3:30-4:45

3 credits. A course for non-science majors covering Earth's origin and history; composition and structure of its interior, crust, oceans, and atmosphere; plate tectonics and sea floor spreading; seismology, vulcanism and earthquakes; Earth's magnetism; forces shaping Earth's surface, faults and folds, erosion, sedimentation and weathering; and Earth's materials, such as soil, minerals and ores, and igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2A. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Political Science 312 ● Massachusetts Politics*

Professor Shannon Jenkins ● MWF 9:00-9:50

3 credits. State governments play an active and important role in setting public policy in the United States.  States are leaders in innovation and hotbeds for reforms and have primary responsibility for many policies that directly affect our day to day lives. The state of Massachusetts is no exception, having led the nation in adoption of policies such as gay marriage, solar power promotion, and health care reform. This course examines Massachusetts politics and policy through the study of the political history and institutions of the state, the interactions of these institutions with interest groups, political parties, the public and the media, and the policies that government produces. Additionally, students will complete a service-learning project to help them understand contemporary public policy issues in Massachusetts; they will then propose solutions to these project in a legislative simulation at the end of the semester. Prerequisites: PSC 101 or junior standing or permission of instructor. University Studies: 5B. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Political Science 313 ● Urban Politics

Professor David Prentiss ● TuTh 8:00-9:15

3 credits. An examination of the challenges of addressing issues and getting things done in an urban context. Topics include the dynamics of city politics, policing practices and the nature of the criminal justice system, business environment and strategies for economic development, and public education reform. The course will have a strong focus on the practical politics and real-life experiences of dealing with these issues. Prerequisites: PSC 101 or junior standing or permission of instructor. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Sociology & Anthropology 338/Sustainability 350 ● Population, Environment & Culture

Professor Maria Gloria de Sa ● TuTh 9:30-10:45

3 credits. Explores vital events in human life such as when and who we marry and sometimes divorce, how we pace and stop childbearing, and why and when we die. Fundamental questions include how the adoption of agriculture, changing patterns of disease, industrialization, urbanization, and international migration have shaped the human lifespan, fertility and health. The course will also examine the impact of consumption on environmental degradation and different paths to sustainability. Prerequisites: SOA 101, 111, or 113 (for SOA 338) or SUS 101 or 202 (for SUS 350). CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Sociology & Anthropology 344 ● Cultures of Memory*

Professor Andrea Klimt ● TuTh 9:30-10:45 (Section 01) or TuTh 11:00-12:15 (Section 02)

3 credits. By closely examining key debates about how people collectively remember – or forget – aspects of their shared past, we will develop an understanding of why the forging of a collective memory of the past is so often at the center of intense struggles over power, identity and social visibility in the present.  By the end of the semester, you will never walk past a monument, visit a museum, read a history book, leaf through a photo album, pass through certain corners of the natural environment, or listen to a family story without wondering about why some versions of the past are prominently celebrated, while others have been silenced and forgotten. Through a series of case studies and your own primary research, we are going to explore how and why our collective memories of the past are continually created and re-created over time. Prerequisites: None. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Sociology & Anthropology 350/Sustainability 350 ● Sustainable Cities

Professor Rachel Kulick ● Wednesday 3:00-5:30

3 credits. This course will explore the widely used term “sustainability” and how it is being applied to identify and address ecological, equity, social, and cultural issues in urban environments.  We will assume a multidisciplinary lens to investigate the dilemmas that cities face in moving towards ecological integrity.  We will pay close attention to sustainable systems and how socioeconomic factors such as disenfranchisement, corporate power, and environmental policies inform these dilemmas.  We will look at case studies from around the world to explore topics ranging from the challenges (climate related natural disasters, water crises, food deserts, excessive carbon emissions, etc.) to just solutions (carbon descent plans, spatial justice initiatives, urban gardens, dumpster diving, and the list goes on). We will also work on a hands-on urban sustainability project. Prerequisites: SOA 101, 111, or 113 (for SOA 338) or SUS 101 or 202 (for SUS 350). University Studies: 5B. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Urban Studies 201 ● City Life: Introduction to Urban Studies

Professor Andrea Klimt ● TuTh 2:00-3:15

3 credits. This course will introduce you to the ways in which scholars and activists from a range of different disciplines investigate the history, culture and social dynamics of American cities.  We will engage with key debates about how to foster socially just access to resources, opportunities, and quality of life for all urban residents and how to help make our cities of the future environmentally and socially sustainable. It will also introduce you to UMass Dartmouth faculty from across the campus who are working on urban-related research. We will explore various facets of urban life and examine ways to promote the social, cultural, and economic vibrancy of cities in our region as well as in wider national and global contexts. Prerequisite: ENL 101. University Studies: 4B. CAS: Humanities or Social Science (but not both). SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

SUMMER 2016 COURSES

Fine Arts 223 ● Nature Drawing I

Professor Andrew Nixon ● May 23-June 6, MTWTF 9:00 AM-2:00 PM

3 credits. Introduction to various methods and materials used to draw from nature. Students work from direct observation of flowers, plants, natural forms and animate objects. Students study form, space, perspective and composition. Various modes of perception, representation and expression are studied and explored. Black and white media are used in Nature Drawing I. Prerequisites: None. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Fine Arts 224 ● Nature Drawing II

Professor Andrew Nixon ● May 23-June 6, MTWTF 9:00 AM-2:00 PM

3 credits. Introduction to various methods and materials used to draw from nature. Students work from direct observation of flowers, plants, natural forms and animate objects. Students study form, space, perspective and composition. Various modes of perception, representation and expression are studied and explored. Color media are used in Nature Drawing II. Prerequisites: None. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Political Science 347 ● Environmental Law

Professor Chad McGuire ● May 23-June 10, Online

3 credits. Introduction to the concepts surrounding environmental law. Students explore the reasons, development, and implementation of environmental laws. Areas of focus include the following: using the law to consider environmental impacts before taking action; using the law to protect water and air quality; the law of land use; and global applications of legal frameworks to deal with large scale environmental problems like climate change. Prerequisite: Junior standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Sociology & Anthropology 334 ● Food, Feast & Famine

Professor Kathryn Caldera ● May 23-June 10, Online

3 credits. Throughout human evolution, knowledge about food gathering, food production, and food choices have been an inherent part of individual and cultural sustainability.  Food has always mediated cultural, political, and economic transactions. Paradoxically, while food production has increased dramatically in the last decades, the common citizen is largely ignorant about food systems. Furthermore, food insecurity remains a reality in both the industrialized and non-industrialized worlds. This course addresses these paradoxes as well as the role of food in both sustaining and undermining social and cultural identities. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

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