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Current and Upcoming Sustainability Courses

Spring 2015 Courses

Winter 2015 Courses

Fall 2014 Courses

 

Sustainability Studies minor requirements (18 credits):

  • SUS 101 or SUS 202 (you may take both, but you must take at least one)
  • Two electives at any level (these MAY count toward your major)
  • Two electives numbered 300 or higher (these may NOT count toward your major)
  • SUS 450 or (with Professor Darst’s advance written permission) a third elective numbered 300 or higher

The requirements for the 15-credit Sustainability concentration within the Liberal Arts major are similar, but not identical. The concentration requires (a) SUS 101 or SUS 202; (b) one elective at any level; and (c) three electives numbered 300 or higher.

Double-counting rules:

  • All courses counting toward the Sustainability minor or Liberal Arts concentration may double-count toward University Studies/General Education and college requirements.  The requirements met by each course are indicated in the list below. “CAS” indicates College of Arts & Sciences distribution requirement.
  • Minor only: Courses may double-count toward major and minor requirements, but courses that double-count toward the major and minor (regardless of course number) cannot be used to fulfill the minor requirement of nine credits numbered 300 or higher. In other words, courses that also count a student’s major may only be used to fulfill the minor requirement of “two electives at any level.”

 

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Spring 2015 Courses

100/200-LEVEL COURSES

Sustainability (SUS) 101-01 ● Principles of Sustainability (Spring 2015)

Professor Chad McGuire ● TuTh 2:00-3:15

3 credits. Fundamental principles of sustainability. The goal is to provide a larger context for topics covered in sustainability courses. Topics covered include: What is Sustainability?, Climate Change and Environmental Challenges, Systems Thinking/Systems Analysis, "Natural" Systems and Function, Human Interactions with Natural Systems, Ethics, and Values. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 4C. CAS: Social Science

 

Bioengineering (BNG) 162-01 ● Designing a Healthier Planet and its People (Spring 2015)

Professor Qinguo Fan ● TuTh 12:30-1:45

3 credits. An overview of important areas of bioengineering with a focus on how design can benefit all biological systems spanning from the environment and our planet, to the humans that populate the planet. Topics include how chemistry can help improve energy sources and help decrease the effect of human activities on the environment, how engineering design can improve the health and well being of humans and how government agencies work to regulate these activities in the U.S. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2B. CAS: Natural Science.

 

Physics (PHY) 162-01 ● Science, Technology, & Society: The Environment (Spring 2015)

Professor John Silva ● MWF 1:00-1:50

3 credits. This course studies current environmental issues and their relations to technological choices. For example, air and water quality are examined in relation to the use of various renewable and non-renewable energy resources. The course is non-mathematical. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2B. CAS: Natural Science.

 

Physics (PHY) 172-01 ● Planet Earth II (Spring 2015)

Professor John Silva ● TuTh 3:30-4:45

3 credits. Topics include weathering, mass wasting, groundwater, dug and artesian wells, the hydrologic cycle, mountain development, structure of the ocean floor, shoreline features, coastlines, and the general characteristics of metamorphic, sedimentary and igneous rocks. Students will also engage in weekly laboratory exercises that will produce data and information related to sustainability issues. Prerequisites: None. CAS: Natural Science.

 

Political Science (PSC) 261-01 ● Topics in International Relations: Sustainability on Campus (Spring 2015)

Professor Robert Darst ● TuTh 12:30-1:45

3 credits. What does it mean to live “sustainably” in a world of limited resources and an increasingly overburdened natural environment? Although these are questions of great global importance, the answers begin at home. We will examine this challenge by exploring almost every corner of UMass Dartmouth and almost every aspect of its daily operations: transportation, power production, architecture, purchasing, landscaping, food services, and more.  What’s more, we will put our knowledge to work by participating in the formulation and implementation of sustainability initiatives on campus. No prior knowledge is necessary—the only requirements are curiosity and a pair of sensible shoes! Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 5B. CAS: Social Science.

 

300/400-LEVEL COURSES

Sustainability (SUS) 450-01 ● Advanced Seminar in Sustainability Studies (Spring 2015)

Professor Marguerite Zarrillo ● MWF 9:00-9:50

3 credits. This course will run concurrently with Physics 419—see description below. No scientific knowledge is required. Prerequisites: Declaration of Sustainability Studies as a minor or Liberal Arts concentration. CAS: Social Science. Important note: There is a total 20-seat enrollment cap for SUS 450 + PHY 419 + CEN 419 (the prefix used by CEN students). Once total enrollment in all three sections reaches 20, further enrollment will be blocked, even if seats appear to be available in an individual section. 

 

Art History (ARH) 322-01 ● Art of the City (Spring 2015)

Professor Anna Dempsey ● TuTh 9:30-10:45

3 credits. Our cities, which provide us with basic shelter and community, have also been a source of great inspiration.  To the ancient Greeks, the public square was the communal heart of the city, and the space where democracy was born.  For artists of the last one hundred and fifty years, urban space has functioned as either the site of modernity and progress, or as the site of decay and decadence (as in Blade Runner, Akira, or American film noir).  More recently, artists have responded to urban and environmental decay and created work to catalyze communities to into action and foster urban “rebirths.” In this class, we will learn how artwork—from painting to public sculptures and site-specific installations—can affect and change the urban experience.  In particular, we will focus on recent artistic interventions that foster cultural and environmental regeneration. Prerequisites: None. CAS: Humanities.

 

Artisanry (ATR) 379 ● Sustainable Textiles (Spring 2015)

Professor Deborah Carlson ● TuTh 12:30-3:15

3 credits. Green/sustainable textile topics. Studio component includes sustainable product development and natural dyes. Topics include issues around sustainable fashion, the global textile industry, and social justice in the arena of textile production, particularly in the developing world. THIS COURSE HAS NO PREREQUISITES FOR SUSTAINABILITY STUDENTS. Ask Professor Carlson (dcarlson2@umassd.edu) for a permission number that will allow you to override the formal prerequisites in COIN.

 

Biology (BIO) 314-01 ● General Ecology (Spring 2015)

Professor Nancy O’Connor ● MWF 10:00-10:50 + Wednesday 2:00-4:45

4 credits. The principles and practices of the scientific discipline of ecology. Interactions among organisms and between organisms and their environment will be emphasized. Interactions will be described and analyzed at the organismal, population, community, and ecosystem levels. In the laboratory, students will use hypothesis-testing and experimentation to examine theoretical and empirical aspects of ecology. Prerequisites: This course is restricted to Biology majors who have completed BIO 121, 122, 234, and 210.

 

Biology (BIO) 402-01 ● Community Ecology (Spring 2015)

Professor Tara Rajaniemi ● TuTh 9:30-10:45

3 credits. Community ecology seeks to explain patterns in biodiversity: how many species, and which species, are found in a given environment.  Explaining these patterns requires an understanding of how pairs of species interact with each other, how those pairwise interactions scale up to structure larger groups of species, and how species pairs and groups respond to the physical environment.  This course will address these questions by exploring conceptual frameworks of communities, mathematical models, foundational publications in the field, and current research. Prerequisites: This course is restricted to Biology majors who have completed BIO 121, 122, 234, and 210.

 

Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEN) 304-01 ● Introduction to Environmental Engineering (Spring 2015)

Professor Chen-Lu Yang ● TuTh 8:00-9:15

3 credits. Introduction to the sanitary engineering field. The environmental problems of urbanization and the natural cycle of water are discussed. Elementary hydrology, physical, chemical and biological principles of the treatment of water and wastewater are covered. Municipal services such as water mains, sanitary sewers and storm water drainage, layout and operation of purification and treatment works are studied in detail. In addition, state and federal regulatory standards are introduced and discussed. Prerequisites: CEN 303 and CHM 152; or permission of instructor.

 

Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEN) 325-01 ● Water Resources Engineering (Spring 2015)

Professor Neil Fennessey ● TuTh 9:30-10:45

3 credits. Elementary surface and groundwater hydrology, pressure flow and open channel flow fundamentals. Topics include basic probability and statistics with a water resources emphasis, watershed based and site drainage concepts, natural and constructed open channel systems, reservoir routing and design, analysis and management issues. Also covered are the analysis and design of pressure flow systems, dam spillways, energy dissipaters and stilling basins. An integrated, systems analyses approach to water resources engineering is emphasized. Prerequisite: CEN 303. Corequisite: CEN 313.

 

Economics (ECO) 492 ● Senior Seminar: Environmental Policy (Spring 2015)

Professor Devon Lynch ● MWF 9:00-9:50

3 credits. Environmental Policy will explore the decision-making process that underlies most of our current environmental laws, regulations, and other policy directives in the United States and internationally. Students will learn about the process of environmental decision-making from an approach that utilizes a total valuation technique in order to fully internalize the costs and benefits of policy directions on our environment and, thus, wellbeing. Core understandings of the science, economics, and value systems that impact environmental policy directions are necessary in order to become adept at utilizing a total valuation technique in understanding and analyzing environmental problems. Prerequisites: ECO 231 and 232 or permission of instructor. CAS: Social Science.

Management (MGT) 312 ● The Legal Framework of Business (Spring 2015)

Professor Richard Golen ● TuTh 8:00-9:15 or TuTh 9:30-10:45 or TuTh 12:30-1:45

Professor Adam Sulkowski ● MWF 2:00-2:50

3 credits. The highlights of law school in one semester, plus highlights of sustainable business. Topics related to sustainability include: corporations, law-making, how agencies regulate, and how liability is established when people are hurt. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and declared Sustainability Studies minor. Gen Ed: E.

 

Mechanical Engineering (MNE) 490-01 ● Special Topics: Ocean Wave Energy Conversion (Spring 2015)

Professor Mehdi Raessi ● MW 3:00-4:15

3 credits. Surface waves; wave modification; basic and advanced wave energy conversion techniques; energy conversion, transmission, and storage; environmental and mooring considerations. Prerequisites: MNE 332 and EGR 301.

 

Philosophy (PHL) 307-01 ● Ecofeminism: Philosophy & Practice (Spring 2015)

Professor Catherine Gardner ● Tuesday 3:30-6:00

3 credits. Study of ecofeminism as systems of oppressions based on race, class, gender, sexuality, and ethnicity that stem from a cultural ideology that enables the oppression of nature. The course explores ecofeminist theories, literature, and practice, including ecofeminist ethics, and the applications of ecofeminism to the lives of individual men and women, as well as cultural institutions and organizations. Prerequisites: None. Gen Ed: C or E. CAS: Humanities.

 

Physics (PHY) 419-01 ● Advanced Traffic Engineering (Spring 2015)

Professor Marguerite Zarrillo ● MWF 9:00-9:50

3 credits. Sustainable transportation is an ever increasing concern. The negative impacts of transportation systems on the environment, their carbon footprint and cost on the quality of human life are a growing problem. Yet, mobility is linked to economic development and equal opportunity for all. How our society decides to provide mobility without destroying our planet is a challenge. Providing access to mobility to all our citizens including the elderly, disabled and unemployed in a safe and economically manner is also a challenge. Often forgotten is the objective of providing mobility to our industrial partners who are in need of delivering resources and goods to our citizens. Knowing how to compute capacity is critical to ensuring that future designs in transport systems have increased capacity while maintaining a safe and healthy environment. No prerequisites for Sustainability students. No prior scientific knowledge is required. Ask Professor Zarrillo (mzarrillo@umassd.edu) for a permission number that will allow you to override the formal prerequisites in COIN. Important note: There is a total 20-seat enrollment cap for SUS 450 + PHY 419 + CEN 419 (the prefix used by CEN students). Once total enrollment in all three sections reaches 20, further enrollment will be blocked, even if seats appear to be available in an individual section.

 

Political Science (PSC) 400-01 ● Topics in American Politics & Policy: State & Local Public Policy (Spring 2015)

Professor Shannon Jenkins ● Wednesday 3:00-5:30

3 credits. This course is a study the role of state and local governments in making public policy.  Students will learn about the structure of state and local governments, the policymaking process and the nature of public policy in a number of substantive policy areas.  In addition, students will analyze and evaluate the policy outputs produced by these two levels of government.  As part of the course requirements, students will complete an applied policy analysis for the town of Dartmouth.  At the end of the semester, students should understand how to analyze public policies and the actions of governments and how to work to produce policy change. Prerequisite: PSC 101 or permission of instructor. CAS: Social Science.

 

Political Science (PSC) 477-01 ● Topics in International Relations: Global Environmental Politics (Spring 2015)

Professor Robert Darst ● Tuesday 3:30-6:00

3 credits. As luck would have it, you were born into one of Earth's rare periods of abrupt climatic change. This development is impressive, to be sure, but not unique: global warming is but the latest chapter in humankind's ever-growing impact on the natural environment, joining a long list that includes the sixth great mass extinction of plant and animal species in Earth's history, the depletion of the planet's ozone layer, desertification, deforestation, toxic chemical contamination, and the creation of a vast continent of floating garbage in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. In this course, we will examine the ecological, socioeconomic, and geopolitical causes of transnational environmental problems and the causes of success and failure in efforts to address them. Prerequisites: None. CAS: Social Science.

 

Women’s and Gender Studies (WGS) 307-01 ● Ecofeminism: Philosophy & Practice (Spring 2015)

Professor Catherine Gardner ● Tuesday 3:30-6:00

3 credits. Study of ecofeminism as systems of oppressions based on race, class, gender, sexuality, and ethnicity that stem from a cultural ideology that enables the oppression of nature. The course explores ecofeminist theories, literature, and practice, including ecofeminist ethics, and the applications of ecofeminism to the lives of individual men and women, as well as cultural institutions and organizations. Prerequisites: None. Gen Ed: C or E. CAS: Humanities.

 

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Winter 2015 Courses

Anthropology/Sociology (ANT/SOC) 334-7101 ● Food, Feast, and Famine (Winter 2015)

Professor Kathryn Caldera ● Online, January 2-23

3 credits. Throughout human evolution, knowledge about food gathering, food production, and food choices have been an inherent part of individual and cultural sustainability.  Food has always mediated cultural, political, and economic transactions. Paradoxically, while food production has increased dramatically in the last decades, the common citizen is largely ignorant about food systems. Furthermore, food insecurity remains a reality in both the industrialized and non-industrialized worlds. This course addresses these paradoxes as well as the role of food in both sustaining and undermining social and cultural identities. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. CAS: Social Science.


English (ENL) 200-7102 ● Studies in Literature: Environmental Literature (Winter 2015)

Professor Anthony Arrigo ● Online, January 2-23

3 credits. In this course we will be concerned with the tradition of nature writing starting with Henry David Thoreau and continuing up to today. We will examine a variety of texts in an attempt to understand how writers have expressed their views and concerns about the environment in which we live. We will consider how certain historical trends continue to influence our feelings towards, and understandings of, the more-than-human world. We will also identify strategies that writers have used to address environmental questions by considering both the form and content of their works. Finally through close reading, critical thinking, and analytical writing, we will investigate the extent to which literary and cultural forms shape the ways in which people see and relate to nature and the environment: that is, to the places where they live, work, travel, and the ways they understand themselves in relation to others and to the natural world. Prerequisite: ENL 102. University Studies: 3A. CAS: Literature.

 

Political Science (PSC) 347-7101 ● Environmental Law (Winter 2015)

Professor Chad McGuire ● Online, January 2-23

3 credits. Introduction to the concepts surrounding environmental law. Students explore the reasons, development, and implementation of environmental laws. Areas of focus include the following: using the law to consider environmental impacts before taking action; using the law to protect water and air quality; the law of land use; and global applications of legal frameworks to deal with large scale environmental problems like climate change. Prerequisite: Junior standing. CAS: Social Science.

 

 

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Fall 2014 Courses

SUS 101-01 ● Principles of Sustainability (Fall 2014)

Professor Chrissy Petitpas ● MWF 11:00-11:50 AM

3 credits. This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of sustainability. We will examine what it means to live and work “sustainably” from the local to the global level, and we will approach these issues from a wide variety of perspectives, including philosophy, policy, economics, sociology, literature, and natural science. No prior knowledge of anything is required! Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 4C.

 

SUS 202-01 ● Topics in Sustainability: Fair Trade & Sustainable Development—Looking Behind the Label (Fall 2014)

Professor Lisa Maya Knauer ● Wednesday 3:00-5:30

3 credits. Nowadays, a lot of businesses, even multinational conglomerates like Walmart and Starbucks, highlight their commitment to "fair trade" and "sustainable development." But what does that really mean? How does the sale of products that are marketed to U.S. and other "first world" consumers as "fair trade" really benefit coffee farmers in Uganda, weavers in Guatemala, or girls in Pakistan? This class will critically examine the discourse, ideology and practice of fair trade and sustainable development. We will explore some case studies in depth, and students will carry out their own hands-on research, investigating specific products, brands, companies or initiatives. Prerequisites: None. Gen Ed:  E or G.  University Studies: 4A.

 

ANT/SOC 334 ● Food, Feast, and Famine (Fall 2014)

Professor Isabel Rodrigues ● TuTh 2:00-3:15 PM (Section 01) or TuTh 3:30-4:45 PM (Section 02)

3 credits. Throughout human evolution, knowledge about food gathering, food production, and food choices have been an inherent part of individual and cultural sustainability.  Food has always mediated cultural, political, and economic transactions. Paradoxically, while food production has increased dramatically in the last decades, the common citizen is largely ignorant about food systems. Furthermore, food insecurity remains a reality in both the industrialized and non-industrialized worlds. This course addresses these paradoxes as well as the role of food in both sustaining and undermining social and cultural identities. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.


ANT/SOC 386-01 ● Sustainability in Action (Fall 2014)

Professor Rachel Kulick ● Wednesday 3:00-5:50

3 credits. This course centers on the frequently, and wildly used terms, "sustainability" and "resiliency" to explore how individuals, groups, and larger communities are actively attempting to create more ecologically, socially, culturally, and economically sustainable systems.  We will pay special attention to the ways that groups attempt to foster justice, equity, and respect for diverse cultures in their everyday practices.  We will look to a variety of media to critically examine expressions of sustainable practices across a wide spectrum including permaculture, urban farming, transition town initiatives, gift economies, and localist movements.  In addition, there will be a hands on dimension through which the class will identify and work on a sustainable action project on campus. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or ANT 111 or SOC 113 or ANT 113 or permission of instructor.

 

ATR 123-01 ● Styling the Apocalypse (Fall 2014)

Professor Deborah Carlson ● Friday 9:00 AM-2:50 PM (this is not a typo)

3 credits. Exploration of the human hand as an essential tool. In order to discover the potential of scavenged materials, an apocalypse narrative will be presented where students develop basic skills, learning to meet fundamental needs of shelter, clothing, food gathering, water, tool making and community. The exchange of knowledge as it exists in the evolving Craft practices of ceramics, fiber, metals, and wood will be explored. Prerequisite: None.

 

BIO 112-01 ● The Ocean Environment (Fall 2014)

Professor Jefferson Turner ● MWF 8:00-8:50 AM

3 credits. The study of the ocean environment as an integrated ecosystem: the biology of marine organisms and the related physical, chemical, and geological processes of the sea with attention given to the exploitation of marine resources and pollution. Not offered for credit to Biology majors. Prerequisites: None. Gen Ed: S. University Studies: 2A

 

CHM 130 ● Chemistry and the Environment (Fall 2014)

Professor Smita Bala ● MWF 1:00-1:50 or MWF 3:00-3:50

3 credits. Available to anyone in the university, this course provides substantial treatment, with demonstrations, of the chemistry involved in consumer concerns (food additives, medicines, detergents, etc.), air and water pollution, elementary biochemistry, and the general question of power generation and utilization (fuel cells, solar energy conversion, nuclear energy, etc.). No knowledge of chemistry is assumed, but it is hoped the student will have had high school chemistry or its equivalent. Prerequisites: None. Gen Ed: S. University Studies: 2A

 

ECO 337-01 ●  Environmental Economics (Fall 2014)

Professor Sarah Cosgrove ● TuTh 2:00-3:15

3 credits. This course will study the fascinating and growing field of environmental and natural resource economics. All the topics covered (e.g., property rights and externalities, regulation and pollution control) will be examined as part of the general focus on the problem of economic growth in the presence of limited environmental and natural resources. We will employ the tools from basic microeconomic theory to study the relationship between the economy and the natural environment. Prerequisite: ECO 231.

 

ENL 357-01 ● Special Topics in Rhetorical Studies: Environmental Communication (Fall 2014)

Professor Jerry Blitefield ● MWF 1:00-1:50

3 credits. This course will examine the various ways individuals and groups communicate about the environment for public understanding. Much of our focus will attend to the strategies environmental activists deploy to craft messages for increasing membership and public support. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor (jblitefield).

 

FIA 223-01 ● Nature Drawing I (Fall 2014)

Professor Alma Davenport ● MW 3:30-6:15

3 credits. In this class, you will learn to draw based on direct observation of flowers, plants, and other natural forms. Black and white media are used in Nature Drawing I. Prerequisite: None. Gen Ed: C

 

FIA 224-01 ● Nature Drawing II (Fall 2014)

Professor Alma Davenport ● TuTh 12:30-3:15

3 credits. In this class, you will learn to draw based on direct observation of flowers, plants, and other natural forms. Color media are used in Nature Drawing II. Prerequisite: None. Gen Ed: C

 

MAR 110-01 ● Natural Hazards and the Ocean (Fall 2014)

Professor Daniel MacDonald ● TuTh 2:00-3:15

3 credits. Natural Hazards & the Ocean is intended to educate students about the roles of the oceans in such natural hazards as hurricanes, earthquakes, global warming, and tsunamis. The course will address student curiosity about these ocean-related hazards, by presenting a conceptual understanding of the relevant underlying ocean-atmosphere, and earth mediated mechanisms. The students will be presented in lecture and through their readings about how the application of the scientific method (a) overturned historical Misunderstandings of Earth geology; (b) explains the far-reaching effects of ocean storm generated waves; (c) relates deep ocean earthquakes to tsunamis; and (d) relates how dust from the North African deserts is related to hurricane generation. Prerequisites: None. Gen Ed: S. University Studies: 2A

 

MGT 312 ● The Legal Framework of Business (Fall 2014)

Professor Richard Golen ● TuTh 8:00-9:15 or TuTh 9:30-10:45

Instructor TBA ● Monday 6:30-9:30 or Wednesday 6:30-9:30

3 credits. The highlights of law school in one semester, plus highlights of sustainable business. Topics related to sustainability include: corporations, law-making, how agencies regulate, and how liability is established when people are hurt. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and declared Sustainability Studies minor. Gen Ed: E. 

 

PHY 162-01 ● Science, Technology, & Society: The Environment (Fall 2014)

Professor John Silva ● TuTh 12:30-1:45

3 credits. This course studies current environmental issues and their relations to technological choices. For example, air and water quality are examined in relation to the use of various renewable and non-renewable energy resources. The course is non-mathematical. Prerequisites: None. Gen Ed: E, S, or G.


PHY 171-01 ● Planet Earth I (Fall 2014)

Professor John Silva ● TuTh 3:30-4:45

3 credits. A course for non-science majors covering Earth's origin and history; composition and structure of its interior, crust, oceans, and atmosphere; plate tectonics and sea floor spreading; seismology, vulcanism and earthquakes; Earth's magnetism; forces shaping Earth's surface, faults and folds, erosion, sedimentation and weathering; and Earth's materials, such as soil, minerals and ores, and igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Prerequisites: None. Gen Ed: S.

 

PSC 384-01 ● International Law & Organization (Fall 2014)

Professor Rose Horton ● MWF 2:00-2:50

3 credits. The world today is plagued by a host of problems that are difficult to address without international cooperation: violent conflict, widespread human rights abuses, environmental degradation, infectious disease, and persistent poverty, to name but a few. Yet we live on a planet with no overarching world government capable of providing authoritative solutions to these problems. Instead, international action is limited by the willingness of individual countries to cooperate with one another, and by their ability to control what goes on within their respective borders. We will explore the resulting patchwork quilt of international rules and organizations as they pertain to international security, economic globalization, and climate change. Prerequisite: PSC 161 or permission of instructor. Gen Ed: G.

 

SOC 381-01 ● Social Impact of Science & Technology (Fall 2014)

Professor Yale Magrass ● MWF 11:00-11:50

3 credits. It would almost impossible to deny that science and its close cousin, technology, are among the most powerful forces shaping modern social life. The word science itself means knowledge and indeed much of modern Western culture virtually equates science with truth. Closely akin to science is technology. Almost all the conveniences of modern life can be attributed to technology, at least in part; however, this same technology has also scattered families and communities, displaced people, concentrated enormous control into relatively few hands, produced weapons of mass destruction, and may destroy the very natural environment upon which life depends. By examining some of the history, philosophy, and sociology of science and technology, the students can assess their role in government, business, and society. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

 

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