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Current and Upcoming Sustainability Courses

Fall 2015 Courses

Summer 2015 Courses

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FALL 2015 COURSES

NOTE: SUS = Sustainability minor content area; CAS = College of Arts & Sciences distribution requirement

 

Sustainability 101-01 ● Principles of Sustainability

Professor Robert Darst ● MWF 11:00-11:50 AM

3 credits. This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of sustainability. We will examine what it means to live and work “sustainably” from the local to the global level, and we will approach these issues from a wide variety of perspectives. No prior knowledge of anything is required! Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 4A or 4C. CAS: Social Science.

 

Sustainability 350-01 ● Special Topics in Sustainability: Environmental Policy

Professor Chad McGuire ● TuTh 2:00-3:15 PM

3 credits. Exploring the evolution of environmental policy in the United States from its historical roots to current issues. American Environmental Policy provides an intensive introduction to the history, evolution, and contemporary forms of environmental policy in the United States. The course focuses on key actors, institutions, processes, and events that have shaped the development of environmental policy over time. Major policy concepts related to the environment are introduced and students are exposed to forms of environmental policy analysis. The course is intended for upper-level undergraduate students who have some basic exposure to sustainability and environmental issues. Prerequisites: None. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Art History 349-01 ● Architecture and Sustainability in American Post-Industrial Cities

Professor Pamela Karimi ● MWF 3:00-3:50

3 credits. In this class, we will focus on the past, present, and future of landmarks and architectural heritage of Post-Industrial Cities in the U.S., illuminating the importance of the history and continued survival of these urban centers. Architecture, urban planning, and design will serve as springboards for discussing larger issues regarding the rise and fall and future of these cities.  Although the literature we cover in this class extends beyond Massachusetts, all assignments will focus on the city of New Bedford. The course involves creative and exciting assignments, including photographing and documenting the architectural heritage of New Bedford, making YouTube videos about sustainable environments, and proposing creative ideas to make use of vacant urban lots. The assignments will be constructed to fit each individual student's background and major. Throughout the course, we will meet with members of the New Bedford community and experts in local and non-profit organizations and students will have the opportunity to use local resources to advance their research. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 3B or 4B. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Biology 112-01 ● The Ocean Environment

Professor Jefferson Turner ● MWF 8:00-8:50 AM

3 credits. The study of the ocean environment as an integrated ecosystem: the biology of marine organisms and the related physical, chemical, and geological processes of the sea with attention given to the exploitation of marine resources and pollution. Not offered for credit to Biology majors. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2A. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Biology 143-01 ● Ecology and Environmental Issues

Professor Tara Rajaniemi ● MWF 12:00-12:50

3 credits. The science of ecology as it applies to major environmental issues. Principles of population, community, and ecosystem ecology will be introduced in the context of such problems as invasive species and global climate change. Students will also learn and apply the scientific method through readings, discussion, and on-campus field research. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2B. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Biology 499-01 ● Capstone Research: Forest Ecology

Professor Tara Rajaniemi Monday 2:00-4:50

3 credits. This capstone section will focus on ecosystem services provided by forests, such as maintenance of biodiversity, biomass production, and carbon storage. The UMD campus has 350 acres of forest that will act as our study site. In addition to reading the relevant scientific literature, students will explore the forest and learn forestry techniques with a state forester from Mass DCR.  Each student will conduct an original, independent field study in the campus forest. Prerequisites: Senior standing; at least 6 credits of 300-400 level BIO classes. University Studies: 5A. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Biology 499-02 ● Capstone Research: Human Impacts on the Marine Environment

Professor Nancy O'Connor ● Monday 3:00-5:45

3 credits. Through guest lectures and independent library research, students will learn about the many ways in which human activities have impacted the marine environment.  Students will select a specific marine impact and research the literature on the topic. Prerequisites: Senior standing; at least 6 credits of 300-400 level BIO classes. University Studies: 5A. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

 

 

Chemistry 130 ● Chemistry and the Environment

Professor Smita Bala ● MWF 1:00-1:50 or MWF 3:00-3:50

3 credits. Available to anyone in the university, this course provides substantial treatment, with demonstrations, of the chemistry involved in consumer concerns (food additives, medicines, detergents, etc.), air and water pollution, elementary biochemistry, and the general question of power generation and utilization (fuel cells, solar energy conversion, nuclear energy, etc.). No knowledge of chemistry is assumed, but it is hoped the student will have had high school chemistry or its equivalent. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2A. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Engineering 303 Engineering Economy

Professor Jeffrey Beaudry TuTh 8:00-9:15

Professor Farzad Azadivar TuTh 11:00-12:15

3 credits. Concepts and methods of engineering economics for decision making in engineering. Introduction of common methods of present worth analysis, rate of return, replacement analysis, and decision making under risk. Market evaluation of technology in competitive world markets including technological change, the environment, public goods and governmental trade policies. Prerequisite: For students in the College of Engineering only. University Studies: 4B. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Fine Arts 223-01 ● Nature Drawing I

Instructor TBA ● MW 4:00-6:45, Star Store Campus

3 credits. In this class, you will learn to draw based on direct observation of flowers, plants, and other natural forms. Black and white media are used in Nature Drawing I. Prerequisite: None. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Management 312 ● The Legal Framework of Business

Professor Richard Golen ● TuTh 8:00-9:15, TuTh 9:30-10:45, or TuTh 12:30-1:45

3 credits. The highlights of law school in one semester, plus highlights of sustainable business. Topics related to sustainability include: corporations, law-making, how agencies regulate, and how liability is established when people are hurt. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and declared Sustainability Studies minor. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy

 

Marine Science 110-01 ● Natural Hazards and the Ocean

Instructor TBA ● TuTh 2:00-3:15

3 credits. Natural Hazards & the Ocean is intended to educate students about the roles of the oceans in such natural hazards as hurricanes, earthquakes, global warming, and tsunamis. The course will address student curiosity about these ocean-related hazards, by presenting a conceptual understanding of the relevant underlying ocean-atmosphere, and earth mediated mechanisms. The students will be presented in lecture and through their readings about how the application of the scientific method (a) overturned historical Misunderstandings of Earth geology; (b) explains the far-reaching effects of ocean storm generated waves; (c) relates deep ocean earthquakes to tsunamis; and (d) relates how dust from the North African deserts is related to hurricane generation. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2A. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Mechanical Engineering 437 Fuel Cells

Professor Sankha Bhowmick ● MWF 9:00-9:50

3 credits. Fundamental engineering principles of fuel cells. Thermodynamics, Reaction Kinetics, Charge and Mass Transport associated with fuel cells will be developed. Characteristics performance evaluation of fuel cells will be discussed. This will be followed by analysis of various types of fuel cells. Prerequisite: MNE 220. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Physics 162-01 ● Science, Technology, & Society II: The Environment

Professor John Silva ● MWF 12:00-12:50 PM

3 credits. This course studies current environmental issues and their relations to technological choices. For example, air and water quality are examined in relation to the use of various renewable and non-renewable energy resources. The course is non-mathematical. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2B. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Physics 171-01 ● Planet Earth I

Professor John Silva ● TuTh 3:30-4:45

3 credits. A course for non-science majors covering Earth's origin and history; composition and structure of its interior, crust, oceans, and atmosphere; plate tectonics and sea floor spreading; seismology, vulcanism and earthquakes; Earth's magnetism; forces shaping Earth's surface, faults and folds, erosion, sedimentation and weathering; and Earth's materials, such as soil, minerals and ores, and igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2A. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Political Science 385-01 ● The Politics of Global Climate Change

Professor Robert Darst ● MWF 2:00-2:50

3 credits. This course will address the politics of global climate change from multiple perspectives. We will examine what scientists know and do not know about climate change; the projected impact of climate change upon ecosystems and human well-being around the globe; the distribution of responsibility for climate emissions; the projected increase in refugees flows and violent conflict linked to climate change; the business, politics, and psychology of climate denial; effective climate communication strategies; climate planning across a wide range of organizations and levels of government; the political implications of global geoengineering; and the past, present, and possible future of international climate cooperation. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 4C. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Sociology/Anthropology 381-01 ● Social Impact of Science & Technology 

Professor Yale Magrass ● MWF 1:00-1:50 PM

3 credits. It would almost impossible to deny that science and its close cousin, technology, are among the most powerful forces shaping modern social life. The word science itself means knowledge and indeed much of modern Western culture virtually equates science with truth. Closely akin to science is technology. Almost all the conveniences of modern life can be attributed to technology, at least in part; however, this same technology has also scattered families and communities, displaced people, concentrated enormous control into relatively few hands, produced weapons of mass destruction, and may destroy the very natural environment upon which life depends. By examining some of the history, philosophy, and sociology of science and technology, the students can assess their role in government, business, and society. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Sociology/Anthropology 386-01 ● Sustainability in Action

Professor Rachel Kulick ● Wednesday 3:00-5:30 PM

3 credits. This course centers on the frequently, and wildly used terms, "sustainability" and "resiliency" to explore how individuals, groups, and larger communities are actively attempting to create more ecologically, socially, culturally, and economically sustainable systems.  We will pay special attention to the ways that groups attempt to foster justice, equity, and respect for diverse cultures in their everyday practices.  We will look to a variety of media to critically examine expressions of sustainable practices across a wide spectrum including permaculture, urban farming, transition town initiatives, gift economies, and localist movements.  In addition, there will be a hands on dimension through which the class will identify and work on a sustainable action project on campus. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or ANT 111 or SOC 113 or ANT 113 or permission of instructor. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

 

SUMMER 2015 COURSES

MAYMESTER: MAY 26-JUNE 12

Sociology/Anthropology 334-7101 ● Sociology of Food—Food, Feast & Famine

Professor Kathryn Caldera ● Maymester, Online

3 credits. Throughout human evolution, knowledge about food gathering, food production, and food choices have been an inherent part of individual and cultural sustainability.  Food has always mediated cultural, political, and economic transactions. Paradoxically, while food production has increased dramatically in the last decades, the common citizen is largely ignorant about food systems. Furthermore, food insecurity remains a reality in both the industrialized and non-industrialized worlds. This course addresses these paradoxes as well as the role of food in both sustaining and undermining social and cultural identities. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Political Science 347-7101 ● Environmental Law

Professor Chad McGuire ● Maymester, Online

3 credits. Introduction to the concepts surrounding environmental law. Students explore the reasons, development, and implementation of environmental laws. Areas of focus include the following: using the law to consider environmental impacts before taking action; using the law to protect water and air quality; the law of land use; and global applications of legal frameworks to deal with large scale environmental problems like climate change. Prerequisite: Junior standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

SUMMER SESSION I: JUNE 16-JULY 15

Biology 143-7101 ● Ecology and Environmental Issues

Professor Tara Rajaniemi ● Summer Session I, Online

3 credits. The science of ecology as it applies to major environmental issues. Principles of population, community, and ecosystem ecology will be introduced in the context of such problems as invasive species and global climate change. Students will also learn and apply the scientific method through readings, discussion, and on-campus field research. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2B. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Chemistry 130-8101 ● Chemistry and the Environment

Professor Brian Blanchette ● Summer Session I, TuWTh 6:00-9:00 PM

3 credits. Available to anyone in the university, this course provides substantial treatment, with demonstrations, of the chemistry involved in consumer concerns (food additives, medicines, detergents, etc.), air and water pollution, elementary biochemistry, and the general question of power generation and utilization (fuel cells, solar energy conversion, nuclear energy, etc.). No knowledge of chemistry is assumed, but it is hoped the student will have had high school chemistry or its equivalent. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2A. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

English 200-7102 ● Studies in Literature: Environmental Literature

Professor Anthony Arrigo ● Summer Session I, Online

3 credits. In this course, we will examine a variety of texts in an attempt to understand how writers have expressed their views and concerns about the environment in which we live. We will explore different religious, economic, and political philosophies that have shaped and been shaped by various writers such as Henry David Thoreau, John Muir, Aldo Leopold, Rachel Carson, and others, and the extent to which literary and cultural forms shape the ways in which people see and relate to nature and the environment. Prerequisite: ENL 102. University Studies: 3A. CAS: Literature. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Management 312-7107 ● Legal Framework of Business

Professor Adam Sulkowski ● Summer Session I, Online

3 credits. The highlights of law school in one semester, plus highlights of sustainable business. Topics related to sustainability include: corporations, law-making, how agencies regulate, and how liability is established when people are hurt. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and business major or Sustainability minor. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

SUMMER SESSION II: JUNE 22-AUGUST 6

Sociology/Anthropology 381-7101 ● Social Impact of Science & Technology 

Professor Jean Robertson ● Summer Session II, Online

3 credits. It would almost impossible to deny that science and its close cousin, technology, are among the most powerful forces shaping modern social life. Almost all the conveniences of modern life can be attributed to technology, at least in part; however, this same technology has also scattered families and communities, displaced people, concentrated enormous control into relatively few hands, produced weapons of mass destruction, and may destroy the very natural environment upon which life depends. By examining some of the history, philosophy, and sociology of science and technology, the students can assess their role in government, business, and society. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

SUMMER SESSION III: JULY 21-AUGUST 19

Economics 337-7107 ● Environmental Economics

Professor Sarah Cosgrove ● Summer Session III, Online

3 credits. This course will study the fascinating and growing field of environmental and natural resource economics. All the topics covered (e.g., property rights and externalities, regulation and pollution control) will be examined as part of the general focus on the problem of economic growth in the presence of limited environmental and natural resources. We will employ the tools from basic microeconomic theory to study the relationship between the economy and the natural environment. Prerequisite: ECO 231. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

SPECIAL SUMMER COURSES: JUNE 15-JUNE 26

Fine Arts 223-8101 ● Nature Drawing I

Professor Andrew Nixon ● June 15-26, MTWTF 9:00 AM-2:00 PM

3 credits. Introduction to various methods and materials used to draw from nature. Students work from direct observation of flowers, plants, natural forms and animate objects. Students study form, space, perspective and composition. Various modes of perception, representation and expression are studied and explored. Black and white media are used in Nature Drawing I. Prerequisites: None. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Fine Arts 224-8101 ● Nature Drawing II

Professor Andrew Nixon ● June 15-26, MTWTF 9:00 AM-2:00 PM

3 credits. Introduction to various methods and materials used to draw from nature. Students work from direct observation of flowers, plants, natural forms and animate objects. Students study form, space, perspective and composition. Various modes of perception, representation and expression are studied and explored. Color media are used in Nature Drawing II. Prerequisites: None. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Senior Standing; at least 6 credits of 300-400 level BIO classes

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