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 Current Course Offerings

Summer 2015: All Courses Fully Online

WGS majors: lots of offerings in the various concentrations!

Non-WGS majors: look below to see how we can help you fulfill distribution requirements!

To Register: http://www.umassd.edu/extension/

 

First Summer Session (June 16 – July 15)

WGS 200: Topics in Women’s and Gender Studies / Prof. S. O’Hara

Under the Nazi occupation of France in World War II, life changed dramatically for French families. Rationing meant that basic goods were in short supply; husbands and fathers were prisoners in Germany; the Vichy government actively collaborated with the Nazis and brutally repressed any challenges to its authority. How did women cope with this new reality? Some courageously joined the Resistance; others collaborated with the new government and with the Nazis; some just tried to put food on the table. Why did they make the choices they did? To answer these questions, we will study literary and historical sources on Occupied France during World War II.

WGS Majors: Arts and Letters Concentration
Non-WGS Majors: This course meets the distribution requirement in Literature
Also cross-listed as FRN 204 and ENL 200

 

WGS 347: Special Topics in Women’s Literature--Memory, Gender, and Space in Contemporary Multicultural Women's Writing / Prof. S. Evans

In this course we will examine the ways gender and ideas about gender influence our connection to and interaction with the spaces around us, and how those interactions appear in memory and thus, in identity. Culture, race, socioeconomic position, all influence both ideas and practice of gender and built space, and the ways women in particular are conditioned to respond to those spaces. With this in mind, we will examine the way that spaces can themselves be gendered, how our novels reveal this, and how we ourselves occupy space in gendered ways.

WGS Majors: Arts and Letters Concentration
Non-WGS Majors: This course meets the distribution requirement in Literature
Also cross-listed as ENL 347

 

WGS 350: Readings in Sociological & Anthropological Literature: Intimate Personal Violence / Prof. S. Krumholz

The topic of this course is Intimate Personal Violence. The focus is more specific than what is commonly referred to as "domestic violence." Domestic violence includes all aspects of violence that occurs between family and some friends. This could include child abuse, elder abuse, and abuse of a parent by a child. Intimate violence refers only to violence between intimate partners. The nature of violence that women experience is often different than ordinary violence. Women's lives are often constructed around the fear of stranger violence, yet they most often experience violence at the hands of family, friends and acquaintances. Most often, in intimate relationships, women are the recipients of the violence. We will explore both the fear and the reality of violence against women. We will examine mutually violent relationships to understand how the dynamics differ. And we will look at the changing response society has had to such violence, and whether or not it is constructive. Much has been made of this issue in the media in recent years. Part of our task will be distinguishing myth from reality.

WGS Majors: Politics, Justice, Policy Concentration
Non-WGS Majors: This course meets the distribution requirement in Social Science
Also cross-listed as CJS 350

 

WGS 369: Global Women’s Health and Activism / Prof. K. McHenry

An overview of women's health through an international perspective. Various women's health issues such as cancer, fertility, maternal mortality, STI/STD, HIV/AIDS, and violence against women are researched and analyzed. The investigation of health issues through a feminist political lens is crucial. The relevance and importance of understanding women's health through a human rights framework will be explored. The aim is to understand how gender inequity impacts women's health. Socioeconomic status, nation, gender and race all play a crucial role in women's health. Most importantly, an investigation into the various political, institutional and activist responses to women's health issues around the world will be undertaken. The level of political commitment to women's health will be analyzed by focusing on key strategies implemented by international institutions like the United Nations, and look at particular government strategies in countries such as Haiti, India, China, and Ghana.

Counts for University Studies Cluster 4C
WGS Majors: Politics, Justice, and Policy Concentration OR Cross-Cultural Inquiry Concentration
Non-WGS Majors: This course meets the distribution requirement in Social Science

7-Week Summer Session (June 22—August 6)

WGS 336: Gender, Policy, and Social Justice / Prof. R. Robinson

Family policy issues in the U.S. such as childcare, family leave, job equity, and marriage and family relationships. U.S. public policy is compared with that of other countries.

WGS Majors: Politics, Justice, Policy Concentration
Non-WGS Majors: This course meets the distribution requirement in Social Science
Cross-listed as SOC 336

 

Second Summer Session (July 21—August 18)

WGS 210: Special Topics in Women’s and Gender Studies / Prof. C. Beggs

Lesbian, gay, pansexual, asexual—these identities are critical to our understanding of sexual meaning and behavior and key to the process of sexual inclusion. The queer body—what it looks like, what it does, how it is constructed as “deviant,” and how it is policed—is the central focus of this class. Like gender, race, and class, sexuality is an essential part of how all societies organizes cultural, economic, and political systems. As such, sexuality is also linked to systems of power and privilege, which means that some bodies and sexual practices are viewed as “normal” and “healthy,” while others are seen as “deviant” or “dangerous.” Our class will consider how sexual identities are socially constructed, how sexual practices are authorized or condemned, and how those marginalized for their sexuality (people of color, women, LGBTQ people, people with disabilities, and asexual people) have functioned as/through sites of resistance.

WGS Majors: Gender Studies Concentration
Non-WGS Majors: This course meets the distribution requirement in Social Science

 

WGS 300: Topics in Women’s and Gender Studies: Racism, Crime and Justice / Prof. V. Saleh-Hanna

In this course we will define and in great detail, assess the racist foundations upon which contemporary society constructs and institutes criminal justice. We will focus heavily on the evolution of historical forms of racist, punitive and violent confine­ment (slavery, apartheid, reservations and colonial wars) into contemporary systems of imprisonment and punishment. We will read Octavia Butler’s Kindred and Toni Morrison’s Beloved as slave narratives, as ideological frameworks that introduce you to the concept of hauntology – a sociological study of the ghosts that haunt contemporary life, the skeletons in this nation’s closets. We will explore the literature that has dealt with this topic in reference to these novels as well as the literature that ad­dresses the larger haunted settings of this land, its victims, oppressors and survivors.

WGS Majors: Politics, Justice, Policy Concentration
Non-WGS Majors: This coruse meets the distribution requirement in Social Science
Cross-listed as CJS 339

 

WGS 362: Women in World History: Women and Gender in Brazilian History / Prof. C. Mehrtens

An exploration of the lives of ordinary women and men in relation to their place in the fabric of global history. The course fosters understanding of the world's infinite variety of cultures by examining what particular constructions of gender tell us about those societies and our own. The main strategy focuses on biography as a tool weaving through gender, class, race, and ethnicity in particular historical periods.

WGS Majors: Arts and Letters Concentration OR Cross-Cultural Inquiry Concentration
Non-WGS Majors: This course meets the distribution requirement in Humanities
Cross-listed as HST 389

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