icon of a paper next to Apply online text
open door next to gray writing "Visit"

General Education Requirement "W" - Written Skills

General Education Curriculum 
As approved by the Faculty Senate through 10/22/97, with clarifications

The following is taken from the General Education Curriculum document, (As approved by the Faculty Senate through 10/22/97)

Each student must take ENL 101 and ENL 102.

Written Skills, Tier 1

Curriculum Standard: Written Skills

The English Department establishes the Objectives and Outcomes for ENL 101 and ENL 102. Faculty Senate review and approval are not required.

Students in English 101 will learn to

  • Develop college level writing that addresses needs of audience, situation and purpose
  • Demonstrate accepted patterns of rhetoric
  • Summarize, paraphrase, synthesize, and analyze material from sources
  • Incorporate and accurately document outside sources using proper documentation format
  • Demonstrate control of syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling.

To obtain these objectives, students in English 101 will:

  1. Write and revise five formal essays through the course of the semester. Included in these five may be a sustained meta-cognitive (or reflective) essay submitted by itself or with a portfolio of writing at the end of the semester (see third item below).
  2. Write approximately five pages per week. These five pages will include drafts of the five required formal essays and other kinds of formal or informal writing, such as: responses to reading; responses to classmates' essays; brainstorming and invention exercises; writing that reflects on the students' learning and composing; in-class exercises designed to give students practice in various rhetorical skills; writing in response to instructor prompts, journal entries, etc. (Not all writing will necessarily be collected and graded by the instructor).
  3. Reflect upon and analyze their own writing and their progress as writers, either at intervals throughout the semester, or in a final essay submitted at the end of the semester that analyzes and traces students' development as writers and researchers (see first item above).
  4. Meet regularly in the computer facilities to write, research, and respond to each others writing.
  5. Read, discuss, and write about assigned essays and other texts. Meet with their instructors in individual conferences at least twice a semester to discuss their writing.
  6. Move beyond the five-paragraph essay model they may have used in high school; write longer formal essays that fully develop and support their ideas and arguments.

In English 102, students will learn the following points:

  1. Write and read critically, with a focus on genres, to develop the writing, rhetorical, and analytical processes they began in ENL 101
  2. Articulate and develop through writing and discussion their ideas about genres
  3. Enhance their skills in argumentative writing
  4. Practice and develop the research skills they acquired in ENL 101
  5. Enhance their skills in responding to and critiquing the writing of their peers.
  6. Apply the metacognitive (or reflective) skills they began in ENL 101 to their writing about genres.
  7. Respond to and critique various genres.
  8. Respond to and critique their own and their classmates' writing.
  9. Continue to hone their writing through attention to structure, grammar, punctuation, and style.

To achieve these objectives, students in ENL 102 will:

  1. Write and revise five formal essays through the course of the semester.
  2. Do a variety of additional formal and informal writing, including responses to reading; responses to classmates' essays; brainstorming and invention exercises; writing that reflects on the students' learning and composing; in-class exercises designed to give students practice in various rhetorical skills and that allows them to grapple with their reading; writing in response to instructor prompts, journal entries, etc. (Not all writing will necessarily be collected and graded by the instructor). Reflect upon and analyze their own writing and their progress as writers at intervals throughout the semester
  3. Write about, rather than be tested on, genres. While instructors may give short quizzes to measure students' understanding of reading and particular terms, writing will supercede testing.
  4. Participate in discussion and in-class writing about genres. (This is not a lecture course; it is a course in critical writing and reading.)
  5. Move beyond the five paragraph mode of writing they may have learned in high school in order to develop and sustain ideas and arguments.

Written Skills, Tier 2, Writing Intensive Courses

Curriculum Standard

Each student must complete at least one writing intensive course (three credits) before their senior year. Procedure: The General Education Committee will establish and maintain a list of courses designated as “writing intensive.” Departments and Colleges may then require students to take courses from this list to satisfy the General Education requirement in Written and Oral Communication Skills.

This will be the basis for acceptance in the General Education Committee’s list of authorized courses for this area:

  1. Assigned writing should have as its primary goal increased understanding of, and ability to communicate clearly, some content matter of the course. Different kinds of writing could be used to achieve these ends including journals, paraphrasing, short essays, reports, graded formal essays, etc. that emphasize a range of learning processes.
  2. A number of written assignments should be given and spread over the semester, as opposed to a single end-of-term paper. Assignments should require successive revisions of a single paper or other assignment.
  3. A suggestion of the writer's audience and purpose for writing should be included in the assignments. If practical, different assignments might have different purposes and audiences. The instructor should introduce and then encourage students to learn the communicative rituals and conventions of a discipline so that they learn to enter the conversation within the field, and become adept at its common genres of expression. The instructor should not be the sole audience for a writing assignment.
  4. Faculty should provide models and examples of effective writing. Evaluative criteria (basis for course grade) should be targeted specifically toward the purposes of writing assignments.2

Outcomes

  1. In their written work, students should control such surface features as grammar and usage.
  2. In their written work, students should develop, structure, and support an argument, if appropriate to the genre.
  3. In their written work, students should implement the conventions of the discipline and genre (e.g., research paper, scientific report, reflective essay, personal narrative) at a level appropriate for college work.
  4. In their written work, students should analyze and synthesize materials and concepts.

QuickLinks

x

+