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Honors Courses—Spring 2015

Additional classes added to the Spring 2015 Course Listing:

 

Honors Business Courses for Spring 2015

 

AccountingACT 211-05H (13514)  Principles of Accounting I
MWF 9:00-9:50am in LARTS 215  Professor Tien-Shih Hsieh

3 Credits. Accounting concepts and procedures, studied through the analysis, classification, recording, and summarizing of business transactions. Financial statements are introduced and shown to be a source of essential information for management and others outside of the business. Ethical issues in financial reporting are considered.

 

Production and Operation MgmtPOM 212-07H (13517)  Business Statistics
MWF 10:00-10:50am in Auditorium 007  Professor Nichalin Summerfield

3 Credits. Examines both descriptive and inferential statistics as applied to business. Topics include graphical and tabular methods of data presentation, probability theory and distributions, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, regression and forecasting. Emphasis is placed on concepts, applications, and the proper use of statistics to collect, analyze, and interpret data. Throughout this course students will use computer software to perform statistical analyses. Students will learn how to make decisions using facts and the techniques of data analysis. Students will also use the internet to supplement classroom learning.

 

Production and Operation MgmtPOM 345-06H (13550)  Operations Management
MWF 11:00-11:50am in Dion 114  Professor Gang Wang

3 Credits. Design, development, direction, and distribution methods used to deliver goods and services. Topics covered include operations strategy and the management of quality, inventory, supply, capacity and demand, and others. Conceptual, analytical, and quantitative techniques are taught to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of transformation processes in organizations.

 

ManagementMGT 201-07H (13523)  Leadership, Teamwork, and Collaboration
MWF 12:00-12:50pm in Dion 109  Professor Kellyann Kowalski

3 Credits. An interactive skills-building course designed to take a thoughtful look at the key skills necessary for personal and managerial success in organizations. Students will develop interpersonal skills relating to understanding themselves, understanding and working with others, understanding and working in teams, and leading individuals and groups.

 

Production and Operation MgmtPOM 333 (TBA)  Quant Business Analysis
TuTh 11:00-12:15pm in SENG 117 Professor Sharon Azadivar

3 Credits. Provides the student with an appreciation of the power and limitations of common managerial techniques used in the analysis of business problems requiring a quantitative decision-making approach. The emphasis is on a careful presentation of problem formulation, mathematical analysis, and solution procedures using examples involving business situations. Computer use is emphasized.

 

MarketingMKT 311-04H (13526)  Principles of Marketing
TuTh 12:30-1:45pm in Library Lecture Hall 207  Professor Jessica Mikeska

3 Credits. A basic understanding of the role and scope of responsibilities facing contemporary marketing management. Emphasis is placed on the integration of marketing principles into an organized approach for decision making.


 

Art HistoryARH 150-04H (5628) ● Modern-Contemporary Art
TuTh 11:00-12:15pm in CVPA-156 ● Professor Hallie Meredith

3 credits. This course introduces students to key moments in the history of modern art in the newly industrial societies of Europe and America.  We will examine objects of visual art including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and video from the late 19th century to the present.  We will also examine the contemporary gallery system and marketplace, in part by means of a field trip to the Museum of Modern Art in New York.  NOTE: The official prerequisite for this course (ARH 125) does not apply to the Honors section.  Because prerequisites cannot be “turned off” for individual sections in COIN, however, you will need to ask Professor Karimi for a permission number in order to enroll yourself in the course OR ask the Honors Director or your advisor to add you to the course by overriding “course requisites” in COIN.  Gen Ed C or G; Distribution requirement: Humanities;  this course fulfills University Studies requirement 3B - the Cultural World: Visual and Performing Arts.

 

BiologyBIO 132-04H (4878) ● Biology of Organisms Laboratory II
Wednesday 2:00-4:45pm in SENG-331 ● Staff

1 credit. Biology of Organisms Laboratory II is the arena in which students’ analytical skills and critical thinking continue to develop.  This course is specifically conceptualized for Honors Biology majors. It is a challenging and enjoyable journey.  As a consequence of exploring scientific hypotheses and working in unique experimental settings, students retain much information concerning the structure, function, and behavioral adaptations of living organisms.  Most importantly, students become independent learners of biology and value both its philosophical and practical significance in today’s world.  Students discover that nature is measurable and factual (=observable) and that biology provides them with naturalistic explanations about life processes and patterns.  Students feel comfortable working in the laboratory and become skillful at using sophisticated equipment; they understand and apply statistical concepts, write scientific papers, design posters and multi-media-based oral presentations, participate in workshop-like experiences, and attend scientific meetings specifically organized for college audiences.  Corequisite: BIO 122.  Gen Ed S; Distribution Requirement: Natural Science.

 

BiologyBIO 211-02H (4884) ● Biology of Populations Laboratory
Tuesday 2:00-4:45 in SENG-336 ● Professor Tara Rajaniemi

1 credit. This lab reinforces concepts in ecology and evolutionary biology that are addressed in the lecture, BIO 210. The lab is also an introduction to using statistics to analyze your data. Topics include interactions among bean beetles, population growth of slime molds, and patterns of plant species diversity on campus. The Honors section will use more open-ended, less cookbook-style labs than the regular section—you will be choosing questions to address and designing experimental methods. This section of the lab is required for Honors Biology majors who are enrolled in BIO 210. Corequisite: BIO 210. Gen Ed S; Distribution Requirement: Natural Science; Gen Ed S and I.

 

BioengineeringBNG 255-02H (13200) ● Biology for Engineers
MWF 1:00-1:50 pm in Library Lecture Hall 206  ● Professor Tracie Ferreira

3 credits. Principles of biology at the biology/engineering interface. The course will discuss biological principles that can inform an approach to engineering that is more in harmony with living systems and it will present engineering analyses of the structure and function of human tissue. Topics include an introduction to molecular biology, evolution and design, cell structure and function, the mechanics of tissues, sensing and signal transmission in the nervous system,  biological energy generation and transduction, chemical detoxification and waste handling, and tissue defense mechanisms.

 

ChemistryCHM 156-02H/02R1 (4727/4728) ● Modern Chemical Principles II
MWF 10:00-10:50 in LARTS 217, Mon.  1:00-1:50pm in SENG-305 ● Professor Melissa Silvia

3 Credits. A continuation of CHM 151. The details of the behavior of solids, liquids, & gases, the types of intermolecular forces, colligative properties, gaseous equilibrium, aqueous equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, kinetics, and nuclear chemistry are emphasized and discussed in light of modern scientific theories. For science and engineering majors. Non-honors sections are offered.  Distribution Requirement: Natural Science.

 

ChemistryCHM 162-05H/05L1 (4744/4745) ● Introduction to Applied Chemistry II
Thursday 11:00-11:50 in SENG 305, 12:00-1:50 in SENG-304 ● Instructor TBD

1 credit. Intermolecular forces; properties of gases, solids, and liquids; aqueous solutions; chemical equilibrium; acids, bases, and buffers; chemical reaction rates; electrochemistry; nuclear chemistry.  Prerequisite: CHM 155 or permission of instructor.  The Honors sections of CHM 156 and 162 are corequisites, except for Chemistry majors, who take CHM 164.  Gen Ed S; Distribution Requirement: Natural Science.

 

EconomicsECO 232-02H (4680) ● Principles of Macroeconomics
TuTh 3:30-4:45 PM in Honors Classroom  LIB 213 ● Professor Neal Olitsky

3 credits. The course examines how the economy works.  First, we will define terms like GDP, the inflation rate, the unemployment rate, and other terms that often appear in the news.  We will also see how these measures are calculated, and discuss how they can be used to assess the state of the economy.  Finally, we will examine how various macroeconomic variables are related to each other.  For example, we will see what happens to interest rates when people start saving more, or what happens to prices when the Federal Reserve System prints too much money.  After taking the class you should have a basic understanding of how the economy works, and thus be better prepared to make economic decisions as heads of your family, and/or voters, and/or policy-makers, and/or business managers.  Gen Ed G; Distribution Requirement: Social Science.   This course fulfills University Studies Area 4B - The Nature of US Society.

 

EnglishENL 102-04H (5159) ● Critical Reading & Writing II
MWF 2:00-2:50 in Honors Classroom LIB 213 ● Instructor TBA

3 credits. A course designed to advance the rhetorical skills and understanding developed in ENL 101. Critical reading of various literary genres and analytic and argumentative writing assignments enhance the student's awareness and use of effective language.  Gen Ed: I – Tier 1; This fulfills the University Studies Requirement 1B – Foundations for Engagement: Critical Reading and Writing.

 

EnglishENL 102-11H (5166) ● Critical Reading & Writing II
WF 11:00-11:50 in CVPA 103, Monday 11:00-11:50 in LARTS 202 ● Instructor TBA

3 credits. A course designed to advance the rhetorical skills and understanding developed in ENL 101. Critical reading of various literary genres and analytic and argumentative writing assignments enhance the student's awareness and use of effective language.  Gen Ed: I – Tier 1; This fulfills the University Studies Requirement 1B – Foundations for Engagement: Critical Reading and Writing.

 

EnglishENL 102-35H (5190) ● Critical Reading & Writing II
Thursday 11:00-12:15 in Honors Classroom LIB 213, Tuesday 11:00-12:15  in LARTS 202 ● Professor Anicca Cox

3 credits. A course designed to advance the rhetorical skills and understanding developed in ENL 101. Critical reading of various literary genres and analytic and argumentative writing assignments enhance the student's awareness and use of effective language.  Gen Ed: I – Tier 1; This fulfills the University Studies Requirement 1B – Foundations for Engagement: Critical Reading and Writing.

 

EnglishENL 102-41H (5196) ● Critical Reading & Writing II
Thursday 9:30-10:45am in LARTS 201A, Tuesday 9:30-10:45 am in LARTS 203 ● Instructor TBA

3 credits. A course designed to advance the rhetorical skills and understanding developed in ENL 101. Critical reading of various literary genres and analytic and argumentative writing assignments enhance the student's awareness and use of effective language.  Gen Ed: I – Tier 1; This fulfills the University Studies Requirement 1B – Foundations for Engagement: Critical Reading and Writing.

 

FoundationsFOU 102-02H (5719) ● Visual Arts Freshman Colloquium II
Tuesday 4:00-5:15 pm in CVPA 153  ● Professor Megan Abajian

1 credit. A forum for faculty and visual artists to present current topics in the arts to new visual art students. It serves as an introduction to the resources of the College of Visual and Performing Arts and the University. In addition, the Colloquium hosts cultural events, providing opportunities for community activities for the CVPA.  Fulfills Gen Ed “C” cultural and artistic literacy.

 

FoundationsFOU 114-06H (5739) ● 2D Workshop
Friday 12:00-3:40 pm in CVPA 354 ● Professor Suzanne Schireson

2 credits. To develop a critical understanding of basic two dimensional design, students explore the processes of idea generation, research, and organization of fundamental visual principles. Comprehension is facilitated by direct implementation in a single medium. Students pursue the development of visual principles in one of the following studio areas: painting, photography, printmaking, illustration, textile design, or electronic imaging. The studio dynamics allow for intense interactions with faculty and fellow students, as well as the enhancement of critical and creative problem solving. Emphasis is placed on constructive critical analysis, visual perception, and the relationship between sensory and reasoning activities.  Fulfills Gen Ed “C” cultural and artistic literacy.

 

HistoryHST 102-02H (6492) ● Western Civilization II
TuTh 12:30-1:45 pm in LARTS-333 ● Professor Robert Pontbriand

3 credits. Western Civilization II: “From Goths to Gargoyles to Gamma Rays.”  This is not your father’s Western Civilization survey course!  Rather, it is a lively and interactive romp through the development of Western civilization from the time of the Gothic to the great wars of the twentieth century and beyond.  The approach is multidisciplinary.  You can expect to explore this history through a variety of media including art, music, literature, philosophy, and religion.  After all, history is not the mere march of events or facts through time, but is, more importantly, an inquiry into their meaning.  The aim of this course is to facilitate an understanding of the process of historical continuity and acculturation, and to develop an appreciation for the study of history and the humanities and to recognize their importance in your own life.  You know what the oracle said: “Know Thyself.”  History 101 is NOT a prerequisite. Do your brain a favor and sign up now!  Gen Ed C or G; Distribution Requirement: Humanities; This course fulfills the University Studies requirement 4A – The Social World: Human Questions and Contexts.

 

HonorsHON 301-01H (4853) ● Honors Research Across the Disciplines
Wednesday 12:00-1:40 pm in Honors Classroom LIB 213 ● Professor Avery Plaw

3 credits. This seminar will prepare you to undertake your Honors thesis or project. You should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE you plan to begin work on your project. We will explore topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, you will identify your project supervisor and submit your initial project proposal. All Honors students MUST complete Honors 301 by the end of their junior year in order to remain in the Honors Program.

 

HonorsHON 301-02H (4854) ● Honors Research Across the Disciplines
Monday 12:00-1:40 pm in Honors Classroom LIB 213  ● Professor Amit Tandon

3 credits. This section is limited to students in Engineering/Physics, Biology, Chemistry, Math and Economics.  This seminar will prepare you to undertake your Honors thesis or project. You should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE you plan to begin work on your project. We will explore topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, you will identify your project supervisor and submit your initial project proposal.  All Honors students MUST complete Honors 301 by the end of their junior year in order to remain in the Honors Program.

 

HonorsHON 301-03H (4855) ● Honors Research Across the Disciplines
Wednesday 3:00-4:40 PM in Honors Classroom LIB 213 ● Professor Brian Ayotte

3 credits. This seminar will prepare you to undertake your Honors thesis or project. You should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE you plan to begin work on your project. We will explore topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, you will identify your project supervisor and submit your initial project proposal. All Honors students MUST complete Honors 301 by the end of their junior year in order to remain in the Honors Program.

 

HonorsHON 490-01H (4856) ● Honors Thesis/Project I 
Days TBA in Room TBA ● Professor Avery Plaw

3 credits. Independent research on an honors project/thesis in partial fulfillment of the University Honors Program requirements for graduation as a Commonwealth Scholar.  Students must contact Professor Plaw for a permission number to take the course.

 

HonorsHON 491-01H (4857) ● Honors Thesis/Project II
Days TBA in Room TBA ● Professor Avery Plaw

3 credits. Additional independent research on an honors project/thesis in partial fulfillment of the University Honors Program requirements for graduation as a Commonwealth Scholar.  Students must contact Professor Plaw for a permission number to take the course.

 

PhilosophyPHL 101-02H (5593) ● Intro to Philosophy
MWF 3:00-3:50 pm in LARTS 110 ● Professor Jennifer Mulnix

3 credits. An introduction to philosophy as the persistent and methodical attempt to think clearly about universal problems of human life, such as ways of knowing and studies in value.  This course fulfills Gen Ed requirements “C” and “E” and University Studies 4A – Human Questions and Contexts.

 

Physics—PHY 182-01H (6997)● Intro to Weather
TuTh 12:30-1:45 pm in SENG 113 ● Professor John Silva

3 credits. The fundamentals of atmospheric science. Basic physical principles which affect the general circulation of the atmosphere and their relation to the day-to-day sequence of weather events are discussed. As part of the course, students generate short-term forecasts using real time information available by computer from the internet.  This course fulfills the Gen Ed Requirement “G” and the University Studies Requirement 2A – Science and the Natural World.

 

Political Science—PSC 261-02H (5119) ● Topics in International Relations
TuTh 12:30-1:45pm in LARTS 102 ● Professor Robert Darst

3 credits. Variable topics course in international relations. This course offers an examination of topical issues affecting the international political system. Typical topics include the international relations of East Asia, the politics of human rights, global terrorism, the politics of drone warfare, and the global politics of everyday things, etc. Open to majors and non-majors, with no prerequisites. May be repeated with change of content. Distribution Requirement: Social Science.

 

PsychologyPSY 202-04H (6346) ● Abnormal Psychology
MWF 2:00-2:50pm in LARTS 107 ● Professor Teal Pedlow

3 credits. Study of development and characteristics of behavior disorders. Topics to be considered include: cause of abnormal behavior, transient personality reaction to acute or special stress, psychoneurotic disorders, and therapeutic measures.  Distribution Requirement: Social Science.

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