Honors Courses—Spring 2017

UMASS DARTMOUTH HONORS PROGRAM

SPRING 2017 HONORS COURSES

 

Registration dates:

 

Please be aware that Spring registration for honors students will be opening on the following

dates:

Monday, November 7, 2016 for students with 100 credits or more;

Tuesday, November 8, 2016 for students with 85 to 99.9 credits

Wednesday, November 9, 2016 for honors students with fewer than 85 credits.

Please register as early as you can to take advantage of the widest range of choice.

 

HONORS COURSES ● SPRING 2017

 

Biology--BIO 132-04H (5600) ● Biology of Organisms Laboratory II
Wednesday 2:00-4:45pm in SENG-331 ● Professor Benjamin B Winslow

1 Credit. Biology of Organisms Laboratory II is the arena in which students’ analytical skills and critical thinking continue to develop. This course is specifically conceptualized for Honors Biology majors. It is a challenging and enjoyable journey. As a consequence of exploring scientific hypotheses and working in unique experimental settings, students retain much information concerning the structure, function, and behavioral adaptations of living organisms. Most importantly, students become independent learners of biology and value both its philosophical and practical significance in today’s world. Students discover that nature is measurable and factual (=observable) and that biology provides them with naturalistic explanations about life processes and patterns. Students feel comfortable working in the laboratory and become skillful at using sophisticated equipment; they understand and apply statistical concepts, write scientific papers, design posters and multi-media-based oral presentations, participate in workshop-like experiences, and attend scientific meetings specifically organized for college audiences. Corequisite: BIO 122.  Prerequisite: BIO 121, 131.  Gen Ed “S”.

 

Biology--BIO 211-04H (5610) ● Biology of Populations Laboratory
Thursday 2:00-4:45 in SENG-336 ● Professor Tara Rajaniemi

1 Credit. This lab reinforces concepts in ecology and evolutionary biology that are addressed in the lecture, BIO 210. The lab is also an introduction to using statistics to analyze your data. Topics include interactions among bean beetles, population growth of slime molds, and patterns of plant species diversity on campus. The Honors section will use more open-ended, less cookbook-style labs than the regular section—you will be choosing questions to address and designing experimental methods. This section of the lab is required for Honors Biology majors who are enrolled in BIO 210. Corequisite: BIO 210. Gen Ed S; College Distribution Requirement (where relevant): Natural Science.

 

Bioengineering—BNG 255-02H (5901) ● Biology for Engineers
MWF 1-1:50pm in (TBA) ● Professor Tracie Ferreira

3 Credits. Principles of biology at the biology/engineering interface. The course will discuss biological principles that can inform an approach to engineering that is more in harmony with living systems and it will present engineering analyses of the structure and function of human tissue. Topics include an introduction to molecular biology, evolution and design, cell structure and function, the mechanics of tissues, sensing and signal transmission in the nervous system, biological energy generation and transduction, chemical detoxification and waste handling, and tissue defense mechanisms. This course fulfills University Studies requirement 2B – Science in the Engaged Community

 

Chemistry--CHM 156-02H (5701) ● Modern Chemical Principles II
MWF 10:00-10:50am in (TBA) ● Professor Melissa Silvia

3 Credits. A continuation of CHM 155. The details of the behavior of solids, liquids, & gases, the types of intermolecular forces, colligative properties, gaseous equilibrium, aqueous equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, kinetics, and nuclear chemistry are emphasized and discussed in light of modern scientific theories. For science and engineering majors. Non-honors sections are offered. Prerequisite: CHM 155 with a grade C or better, or permission of the instructor. Gen. Ed. “S”; College Distribution Requirement (where relevant): Natural Science.

 

Chemistry--CHM 162-05H/05L1 (5717/5718) ● Introduction to Applied Chemistry II
Thursday 11:00-11:50am in (TBA), 12:00-1:50pm in SENG-304 ● Professor Russell Bessette

1 Credit. Intermolecular forces; properties of gases, solids, and liquids; aqueous solutions; chemical equilibrium; acids, bases, and buffers; chemical reaction rates; electrochemistry; nuclear chemistry. Prerequisites: CHM 155 and 161 with grades C or better, or permission of instructor. The Honors sections of CHM 156 and 162 are corequisites, except for Chemistry majors, who take CHM 164 lab. Gen Ed S; College Distribution Requirement (where relevant): Natural Science.

 

General Engineering—EGR 498-02H (5898) ● Bioengineering Capstone Design II
TuTh 2-3:15pm in Textile Building 224 ● Professor Qinguo Fan

2 Credits. Application of knowledge gained in various courses to the synthesis, analysis, and design of a system in a particular bioengineering field of interest selected by the student's team. The product proposed in EGR 497 will be built in EGR 498. This course in combination with EGR 497 fulfills University Studies requirements 5A and 5B.

 

English--ENL 102-04H (6916) ● Critical Writing & Reading II
Monday & Wednesday 2-2:50pm in LARTS-213 & Friday 2:00-2:50 in LARTS 203 ● Instructor TBD

3 Credits. A course designed to advance the rhetorical skills and understanding developed in ENL 101. Critical reading of various literary genres and analytic and argumentative writing assignments enhance the student's awareness and use of effective language. Gen Ed: I – Tier 1; This course fulfills University Studies Requirement 1B – Foundations for Engagement: Critical Reading and Writing.

 

English--ENL 102-35H (6945) ● Critical Writing & Reading II
Tu 11-12:15pm in (TBD) & Th 11-12:15pm in (TBD) ● Instructor TBD

3 Credits. A course designed to advance the rhetorical skills and understanding developed in ENL 101. Critical reading of various literary genres and analytic and argumentative writing assignments enhance the student's awareness and use of effective language. Gen Ed: I – Tier 1; This course fulfills the University Studies Requirement 1B – Foundations for Engagement: Critical Reading and Writing.

 

French - FRN 204-01H-LEC (12090) /ENL 200 (cross-listed in FRN and ENL) ● French Literature in Translation; WWII in French Film and Literature
MWF 1-1:50pm in Honors Classroom ● Professor Stephanie O’Hara

3 Credits. Note: Course taught in English with readings in English translation. Course does not satisfy College of Arts and Sciences language requirement. In this course, we will analyze literary works and films that portray life in Occupied France during World War II, or that were produced during that time, or both. These materials will be supplemented and contextualized with readings from the work of historians such as Robert Paxton, Henry Rousso, and Marc Bloch. Some of the primary sources used allegorize the Occupation; some try to understand events as they happen; others attempt to grapple with them after the fact, at a remove of several years or several decades. Why could Anouilh's play Antigone make it past the Nazi censors and still convey a message of resistance, while works such as Vercors's Le Silence de la mer had to be published clandestinely? Irène Némirovsky, who was Jewish, wrote Suite française while in hiding; the manuscript of the novel was found only in 1998. How do some films mythologize the Resistance, whereas others do not? How can we balance analysis of our primary sources as cultural artifacts and as historical sources?  This course fulfills University Studies Requirement 3A. Dependent on College/Major, it can also satisfy a Literature requirement.

 

Honors--HON 202-01H (6497) ● Transformative North American Ideas: Topics in Social Justicse
TuTh 12:30-1:45pm in Honors Classroom ● Professor Jennifer Mulnix

3 Credits. This course will examine central social justice issues in North American society and evaluate them from various theoretical approaches. Social justice involves promoting a just society in terms of the distribution of wealth, opportunities, and privileges within that society, including challenging inequality and valuing diversity. How are identities, experiences, and structures of race, gender, and class intertwined with social justice in the North American context? In this course, students will be encouraged to think critically and expansively about the social world and the conditions of humanity.  This course fulfills the University Studies Requirement 4B – Nature of US Society. 

 

Honors--HON 203-01H (10134) ● Creating Global Community
MW 3:30-4:45pm in (TBA) ● Professor Bharatendra Rai

3 Credits. This course examines both descriptive and inferential statistics as applied to business. Topics covered include graphical and tabular methods of data presentation, probability theory and distributions, hypothesis testing, tests of goodness of fit & independence, & regression. Emphasis is placed on concepts, applications and the proper use of statistics to collect, analyze and interpret data. Throughout this course students will use computer software such as RStudio and Excel to perform statistical analyses. Students will learn how to make decisions using facts and the techniques of data analysis.  Students will also use the Internet to supplement classroom learning. We emphasize the use of technology in solving statistics problems, and address global issues of interest. Particular emphasis is placed on ethical issues associated with data analysis, and the impact on business stakeholders, both domestic and international.     This course fulfills the University Studies Requirement 4C – Creating Global Community.  CCB Honors Students can use the course in this specific semester as a substitute for POM 212, a required course for all Business Majors.

 

Honors 301-02H (6499) ● Honors Research Across the Disciplines
Tuesday 3:30-5:10pm in Honors Classroom ● Professor Timothy Walker

3 Credits. This seminar will prepare you to undertake your Honors thesis or project. You should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE you plan to begin work on your project. We will explore topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, you will identify your project supervisor and submit your initial project proposal. All Honors students MUST complete Honors 301 by the end of their junior year in order to remain in the Honors Program. This course fulfills University Studies Requirement 4C – Creating Global Community.

 

Honors 301-03H (6500) ● Honors Research Across the Disciplines
Wednesday 3-4:40pm in Honors Classroom ● Professor Brian Ayotte

3 Credits. This seminar will prepare you to undertake your Honors thesis or project. You should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE you plan to begin work on your project. We will explore topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, you will identify your project supervisor and submit your initial project proposal. All Honors students MUST complete Honors 301 by the end of their junior year in order to remain in the Honors Program. This course fulfills University Studies Requirement 4C – Creating Global Community.

 

Management Information Systems – MIS 101-06H/6HL (7256/7257) ● The Business Organization
MW 12-12:50pm in (TBD) and F 12-12:50pm in CCB 341 ● Professor Rui Huang

3 Credits. A technology-based, cross-discipline course for first-year students, the first business core course. It introduces first-year business majors to the world of business and enriches their first year experience. It provides students with an overview of business, its environment and its subsystems (e.g. operations, marketing, accounting, finance and information systems); and enhances their computer and team-working skills. Through informational and advising experiences students make decisions in areas such as the selection of courses, a major, a career and the utilization of on-campus student resources. Prerequisite: Honors Program Students Only. Freshman Business Majors Only. Gen. Ed. E. This course fulfills University Studies Requirement IE – Learning Through Engagement.

 

Physics – PHY 114-02H/02HL/02HR (9505/9506/9507) ● Classical Physics II
MWF 12-12:50/Th 4-5:50pm/Th 3-3:50pm in SENG 207/TBD/TBD ● Professor Marguerite Zarrillo/TBD/TBD

4 Credits. A calculus-based introduction to the concepts of electricity and magnetism. Study of electric and magnetic fields, electric potential, capacitance and inductance, elementary circuits, and electromagnetic oscillations. Laboratory experiments provide students with a solid understanding of basic DC circuit concepts and an introduction to AC circuits. Prerequisite: Honors Program Students Only  Prerequisite: PHY 111 or PHY 113; MTH 152 or MTH 154 or permission of instructor.  This course fulfills University Studies Requirement 2A – Science of the Natural World. Gen.Ed. S

 

Physics – PHY 152-01H (9514) ● Stars, Planets, and the Search for Extraterrestrial Life
TuTh 12:30-1:45pm in SENG 102 ● Professor Alan Hirshfeld

3 Credits. Introduction to the science of the Sun and stars - their properties, energy-making processes, formation, and life histories - plus analysis of two societal issues: the viability of solar power (both sunlight and thermonuclear-fusion) as a means of terrestrial energy production; and the question of whether life exists on planets elsewhere in the universe. Prerequisite: Honors Program Students Only.  This course fulfills University Studies Requirement 2A – Science of the Natural World or 2B – Science in the Engaged Community.

 

Production and Operation Management – POM 333-01H (6830) ● Quant Business Analysis
TuTh 12:30-1:45pm in (TBD) ● Professor Uday Kant Jha

3 Credits. Provides the student with an appreciation of the power and limitations of common managerial techniques used in the analysis of business problems requiring a quantitative decision-making approach. The emphasis is on a careful presentation of problem formulation, mathematical analysis, and solution procedures using examples involving business situations. Computer use is emphasized. Prerequisite: POM 212 or MGT 212; Junior standing; Business Majors, Business Administration Minor, or Material & Textiles Majors: OR by permission of the appropriate department chairperson

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