Honors Courses—Spring 2016

Registration for Honors Begins:

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

 

UMASS DARTMOUTH HONORS PROGRAM
HONORS COURSES ● SPRING 2016

 

Accounting—ACT 211-04H (6629) ● Principles of Accounting I
MWF 8:00-8:50am in SENG-118 ● Professor Michael Griffin

3 Credits. Accounting concepts and procedures, studied through the analysis, classification, recording, and summarizing of business transactions. Financial statements are introduced and shown to be a source of essential information for management and others outside of the business. Ethical issues in financial reporting are considered.
Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing

 

Art History--ARH 150-04H (5849) ● Modern-Contemporary Art
MWF 3-3:50pm in CVPA-105 ● Professor Pamela Karimi

3 Credits. This course introduces students to key moments in the history of modern art in the newly industrial societies of Europe and America. We will examine objects of visual art including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and video from the late 19th century to the present. We will also examine the contemporary gallery system and marketplace, in part by means of a field trip to the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.
NOTE: The official prerequisite for this course (ARH 125) does not apply to the Honors section. Because prerequisites cannot be “turned off” for individual sections in COIN, however, you will need to ask Professor Karimi for a permission number in order to enroll yourself in the course OR ask the Honors Director or your advisor to add you to the course by overriding “course requisites” in COIN. Gen Ed C or G; College Distribution Requirement (where relevant): Humanities.
This course fulfills University Studies requirement 3B - the Cultural World: Visual and Performing Arts.

 

Biology--BIO 132-04H (4957) ● Biology of Organisms Laboratory II
Wednesday 2:00-4:45pm in SENG-331 ● Professor Benjamin B Winslow

1 Credit. Biology of Organisms Laboratory II is the arena in which students’ analytical skills and critical thinking continue to develop. This course is specifically conceptualized for Honors Biology majors. It is a challenging and enjoyable journey. As a consequence of exploring scientific hypotheses and working in unique experimental settings, students retain much information concerning the structure, function, and behavioral adaptations of living organisms. Most importantly, students become independent learners of biology and value both its philosophical and practical significance in today’s world. Students discover that nature is measurable and factual (=observable) and that biology provides them with naturalistic explanations about life processes and patterns. Students feel comfortable working in the laboratory and become skillful at using sophisticated equipment; they understand and apply statistical concepts, write scientific papers, design posters and multi-media-based oral presentations, participate in workshop-like experiences, and attend scientific meetings specifically organized for college audiences. Corequisite: BIO 122. Gen Ed “S”.
Prerequisite: BIO 121, 131

 

Biology--BIO 211-04H (4968) ● Biology of Populations Laboratory
Thursday 2:00-4:45 in SENG-336 ● Instructor TBD

1 Credit. This lab reinforces concepts in ecology and evolutionary biology that are addressed in the lecture, BIO 210. The lab is also an introduction to using statistics to analyze your data. Topics include interactions among bean beetles, population growth of slime molds, and patterns of plant species diversity on campus. The Honors section will use more open-ended, less cookbook-style labs than the regular section—you will be choosing questions to address and designing experimental methods. This section of the lab is required for Honors Biology majors who are enrolled in BIO 210. Corequisite: BIO 210.
Gen Ed S; College Distribution Requirement (where relevant): Natural Science.

 

Bioengineering—BNG 255-02H (5366) ● Biology for Engineers
MWF 1-1:50pm in Library Lecture Hall 206 ● Professor Tracie Ferreira

3 Credits. Principles of biology at the biology/engineering interface. The course will discuss biological principles that can inform an approach to engineering that is more in harmony with living systems and it will present engineering analyses of the structure and function of human tissue. Topics include an introduction to molecular biology, evolution and design, cell structure and function, the mechanics of tissues, sensing and signal transmission in the nervous system, biological energy generation and transduction, chemical detoxification and waste handling, and tissue defense mechanisms.
This course fulfills University Studies requirement 2B – Science in the Engaged Community

 

Chemistry--CHM 156-02H/02R1 (5102/5103) ● Modern Chemical Principles II
MWF 10:00-10:50am in SENG-210, Wed. 1:00-1:50pm in SENG-215 ● Professor David Manke

3 Credits. A continuation of CHM 155. The details of the behavior of solids, liquids, & gases, the types of intermolecular forces, colligative properties, gaseous equilibrium, aqueous equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, kinetics, and nuclear chemistry are emphasized and discussed in light of modern scientific theories. For science and engineering majors. Non-honors sections are offered. Prerequisite: CHM 155 with a grade C or better, or permission of the instructor. Gen. Ed. “S”; College Distribution Requirement (where relevant): Natural Science.

 

Chemistry--CHM 162-05H/05L1 (5120/5121) ● Introduction to Applied Chemistry II
Thursday 11:00-11:50am in SENG 305, 12:00-1:50pm in SENG-304 ● Professor Russell Bessette

1 Credit. Intermolecular forces; properties of gases, solids, and liquids; aqueous solutions; chemical equilibrium; acids, bases, and buffers; chemical reaction rates; electrochemistry; nuclear chemistry. Prerequisites: CHM 155 and 161 with grades C or better, or permission of instructor. The Honors sections of CHM 156 and 162 are corequisites, except for Chemistry majors, who take CHM 164 lab. Gen Ed S; College Distribution Requirement (where relevant): Natural Science.

 

General Engineering—EGR 498-02H (5363) ● Bioengineering Capstone Design II
TuTh 2-3:15pm in Textile Building 224 ● Professor Qinguo Fan

2 Credits. Application of knowledge gained in various courses to the synthesis, analysis, and design of a system in a particular bioengineering field of interest selected by the student's team. The product proposed in EGR 497 will be built in EGR 498.
This course in combination with EGR 497 fulfills University Studies requirements 5A and 5B.

 

English--ENL 102-04H (7197) ● Critical Writing & Reading II
Monday 2-2:50pm in LARTS-202 & WF 2:00-2:50 in Honors Classroom ● Instructor TBD

3 Credits. A course designed to advance the rhetorical skills and understanding developed in ENL 101. Critical reading of various literary genres and analytic and argumentative writing assignments enhance the student's awareness and use of effective language. Gen Ed: I – Tier 1; This course fulfills University Studies Requirement 1B – Foundations for Engagement: Critical Reading and Writing.

 

English--ENL 102-35H (7262) ● Critical Writing & Reading II
Tuesday 11-12:15 in SENG 305 & Thursday 11-12:15pm in LARTS 202 ● Professor Alexis Teagarden

3 Credits. A course designed to advance the rhetorical skills and understanding developed in ENL 101. Critical reading of various literary genres and analytic and argumentative writing assignments enhance the student's awareness and use of effective language. Gen Ed: I – Tier 1; This course fulfills the University Studies Requirement 1B – Foundations for Engagement: Critical Reading and Writing.

 

Honors--HON 202-01H (6196) ● Transformative American Ideas: Violence, Freedom, and Power. NEW COURSE
TuTh 8-9:15am in Honors Classroom ● Professor Tryon Woods

3 Credits. This honors course investigates significant American contributions to human civilization. Since the eligible topics are numerous, we aim not for comprehensive coverage, but rather for an ethical confrontation with the time-space coordinates of the so-called New World constituted through European settler colonialism in North America and the transatlantic enslavement of Africans. In this course, “ethical” will mean a rigorous examination of the world as it is, not as we might wish it to be or as various national mythologies purport it to be. In other words, we will conduct a political reading of the course of human civilization in North America. We will use the theme of “freedom” to organize our historically grounded investigation. What does it mean that the very societies that innovated the modern conception of “liberty,” “democracy,” and “rights” simultaneously created the modern institution of slavery? How has this violent foundation been challenged, and how has this violence itself posed dire challenges, over the course of six centuries of social, cultural, and economic development? Among the topics we will use to animate our meditations on freedom will be marronage, the chain gang, blues-jazz-hip hop, suburbanization, the shopping mall, and the interstate freeway system—all arguably American contributions to human civilization, as well as subjects wherein the foundational violence of slavery and settler colonialism is rent through contemporary structures.

This course will draw from across the humanities and social sciences, including law and architecture, build a political vocabulary of power (i.e., race, sex, gender, class, nation), and place a premium on close, critical readings of course materials with an eye towards making analytical connections to current events.
This course fulfills University Studies Requirement 4B – The Nature of US Society

 

Honors--HON 203-01H (6196) ● Creating Global Community – People On The Move
TuTh 3:30-4:45pm in DION-114 ● Professor Lisa Knauer NEW COURSE

3 Credits. Globalization is often discussed in terms of flows of financial markets, ideas or cultural products like music. Our current globalized world is also characterized by the movement of people – from rural areas to major cities within countries, and across national borders. In the U.S., politicians, scholars and the media have been dissecting the significance of the recent “surge” of unaccompanied Central American youngsters across the U.S./Mexican border, while across the Atlantic, no one seems to have a solution for the influx of Syrian or Iraqi refugees, Africans and the ensuing human tragedies. This class will look at contemporary migrations and immigrant communities from a global and interdisciplinary perspective, paying close attention to how issues of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, age, religion and other forms of difference have shaped current and recent migrations. I am using the term migration broadly, and one of the issues this class will examine is how the discourses surrounding migration reflect broader political and social concerns: who gets labeled a refugee or exile (and thus deserving of help and special status) and who gets labeled an economic migrant (and thus less deserving and potentially deportable) is not always a clear-cut distinction.

While rooted in social science disciplines such as anthropology and cultural geography, this class will also draw upon film and literature about migrants and refugees, and the cultural production of migrants and refugees themselves, including first person narratives, poems and blogs. Students will be encouraged to draw upon their own familial experiences of migration where relevant.

The class will bridge global and local contexts. A service-learning component will allow students to engage with local immigrant communities and organizations that work with immigrants in our region. Students will produce individual or collaborative research projects, which can involve first-person research as well as written sources, and they will be encouraged to create photo essay or a website, instead of a traditional poster or research paper.
This course fulfills University Studies requirement 4C – The Nature of the Global Society

 

Honors 301-01H (6273) ● Honors Research Across the Disciplines
Tuesday 3:30-5:10pm in Honors Classroom ● Professor Robert Darst
The Honors Program is pleased to welcome back Professor Darst!

3 Credits. This seminar will prepare you to undertake your Honors thesis or project. You should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE you plan to begin work on your project. We will explore topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, you will identify your project supervisor and submit your initial project proposal. All Honors students MUST complete Honors 301 by the end of their junior year in order to remain in the Honors Program.

 

Honors 301-02H (6274) ● Honors Research Across the Disciplines
Monday 3-4:40pm in Honors Classroom ● Professor Brian Ayotte

3 Credits. This seminar will prepare you to undertake your Honors thesis or project. You should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE you plan to begin work on your project. We will explore topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, you will identify your project supervisor and submit your initial project proposal. All Honors students MUST complete Honors 301 by the end of their junior year in order to remain in the Honors Program.

 

Honors 301-03H (6275) ● Honors Research Across the Disciplines
Wednesday 3-5:10pm in Honors Classroom ● Professor Timothy Walker
The Honors Program is pleased to be able to welcome Prof. Walker, whose research crosses disciplines and national boundaries. He is an historian with, among other things, a specialization in the history of medicine in different countries.

3 Credits. This seminar will prepare you to undertake your Honors thesis or project. You should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE you plan to begin work on your project. We will explore topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, you will identify your project supervisor and submit your initial project proposal. All Honors students MUST complete Honors 301 by the end of their junior year in order to remain in the Honors Program.

 

Management-MGT 201-09H (6807) ● Leadership, Teamwork, and Collaboration
MWF 1-1:50pm in DION ● Professor Kellyann Kowalski

3 Credits. An interactive skills-building course designed to take a thoughtful look at the key skills necessary for personal and managerial success in organizations. Students will develop interpersonal skills relating to understanding themselves, understanding and working with others, understanding and working in teams, and leading individuals and groups. Prerequisite: CCB majors or Bus Ad Minors only, and Sophomore standing

 

Marketing-MKT 311-04H (6841) ● Principles of Marketing
TuTh 9:30-10:45am in Textile Bldg ● Professor Wencheng Chang

3 Credits. A basic understanding of the role and scope of responsibilities facing contemporary marketing management. Emphasis is placed on the integration of marketing principles into an organized approach for decision making.
Prerequisite: ENL 265; Junior standing; Business Majors, Business Administration Minor, Finance Minor or Material & Textiles Majors. Gen Ed Requirement Designation: Oral Skills/Ethics

 

Nursing-NUR 106-04H (6438) ● Introduction to Professional Nursing
MW 3-4:15pm in Textile Bldg ● Professor Jennifer Viveiros

3 Credits. Provides an introduction to the discipline of professional nursing. Learners examine their values and beliefs in relation to the basic concepts and behaviors that define the discipline. Promoting health, guiding persons through the health care experience and shaping the health care environment are presented as key processes to maximize health for individuals, families, groups and communities. Emphasis is placed on socializing the learner as an active, developing professional within the context and dimensions of the discipline. Learners will explore their relationship to self, individuals, families and communities as well as to the profession of nursing.
Prerequisite: Nursing major; At least Freshman standing
This course fulfills University Studies requirement 1E – Foundation for Learning through Engagement

 

Physics—PHY 113-03H (5276) ● Classical Physics I
MWF 9-9:50am in SENG 113 ● Professor Marguerite Zarrillo

4 Credits. Calculus-based introduction to classical mechanics, emphasizing problem solving. Topics include 1- and 2-dimensional kinematics and dynamics; Newton's Laws of Motion; work, energy and momentum; and rotational motion and angular momentum. Many of these topics are further explored in laboratory experiments. Prerequisite: MTH 151 or MTH 153, or permission of instructor. Gen. Ed. “S”; College Distribution Requirement (where applicable): Science.

 

Physics—PHY 251-02H (5301) ● Intermediate Astronomy
TuTh 2-3:15pm in SENG 102 ● Professor Alan Hirshfeld

3 Credits. Underlying physical processes that determine the appearance and behavior of astronomical objects, such as planets, stars, galaxies, and the universe itself will be emphasized. The technology of modern astronomical observation will also be discussed. Simple mathematics, including algebra and power-of-ten notation, will be used. Observations of celestial objects will be made at the university observatory. Prerequisite: PHY 151 OR permission of instructor. Gen Ed “S”; College Distribution Requirement (where applicable): Natural Science; this course fulfills the University Studies Requirement 2A OR 2B – the Natural World: the Science of the Natural World.

 

Production and Operation Management—POM 212-06H ● Business Statistics
MWF 10-10:50am in LARTS 217 ● Professor Nichalin Summerfield

3 Credits. Examines both descriptive and inferential statistics as applied to business. Topics include graphical and tabular methods of data presentation, probability theory and distributions, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, regression and forecasting. Emphasis is placed on concepts, applications, and the proper use of statistics to collect, analyze, and interpret data. Throughout this course students will use computer software to perform statistical analyses. Students will learn how to make decisions using facts and the techniques of data analysis. Students will also use the internet to supplement classroom learning. Prerequisite: MTH 107 or MTH 103; Sophomore standing

 

Production and Operation Management—POM 333-01H ● Quant Business Analysis
TuTh 12:30-1:45pm in SENG 117 ● Professor Sharon Azadivar

3 Credits. Provides the student with an appreciation of the power and limitations of common managerial techniques used in the analysis of business problems requiring a quantitative decision-making approach. The emphasis is on a careful presentation of problem formulation, mathematical analysis, and solution procedures using examples involving business situations. Computer use is emphasized. Prerequisite: POM 212 or MGT 212; Junior standing; Business Majors, Business Administration Minor, or Material & Textiles Majors: OR by permission of the appropriate department chairperson

 

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