Honors Courses—Fall 2016

UMASS DARTMOUTH HONORS PROGRAM

FALL 2016 HONORS COURSES

Registration dates:

Please be aware that Fall registration for honors students will be opening on the following dates:

April 11, 2016 for students with 100 credits or more;

April 12, 2016 for students with 85 to 99.9 credits

April 13, 2016 for honors students with fewer than 85 credits.

Please register as early as you can to take advantage of the widest range of choice.

 

Fall 2016 Honors Courses:

 

Accounting—ACT 211-09H ● Principles of Accounting I (14175) 
MWF 9:00-9:50AM ● SENG-117 ● Prof. Michael Griffin

3 Credits. Accounting concepts and procedures, studied through the analysis, classification, recording, and summarizing of business transactions. Financial statements are introduced and shown to be a source of essential information for management and others outside of the business. Ethical issues in financial reporting are considered.

 

Art History ARH 208-01H ● Art, Disaster and Memory (12726)

MWF 1:00-1:50PM ● Honors Classroom (Library-213) ● Prof. Thomas Stubblefield

Three credits. This class will consider the role of photography, film, painting and sculpture in the experience and memory of disaster.  Focusing on Hiroshima, Hurricane Katrina and 9/11, we will consider the consequences of the camera’s presence at scenes of disaster, the function of the memorial with regard to the formation of collective memory and the challenges that the seemingly unrepresentable nature of such events poses for artists, audiences and survivors.  These issues will be explored through the lens of visual culture and as such will incorporate “high art” examples alongside more “popular” forms such as amateur photography and the disaster movie.  Fulfills University Studies requirement 3B - The Cultural World: Visual and Performing Arts as well as the Humanities requirement for CAS majors.  There are no prereq’s for the course.

 

Biology BIO131-01HBiology of Organisms Laboratory I (5677)

Tuesday 9:30AM-12:15PM ● SENG-331 ● Prof. Benjamin Winslow

One credit. Biology of Organisms Laboratory BIO-131H is the arena in which students’ analytical skills and critical thinking develop. BIO-131H is a challenging and enjoyable journey. As a consequence of exploring scientific hypotheses and working in unique experimental settings, students retain much information concerning the structure, function, and behavioral adaptations of living organisms. Most importantly, students become independent learners of biology and value both its philosophical and practical significance in today’s world. Students discover that nature is measurable and factual (=observable) and that biology provides them with naturalistic explanations about life processes and patterns. Students feel comfortable working in the laboratory and become skillful at using sophisticated equipment; they understand and apply statistical concepts, write scientific papers, design posters and multi-media-based oral presentations, participate in workshop-like experiences, and attend scientific meetings specifically organized for college audiences. Corequisite: BIO 121 or permission of instructor. Fulfills Gen Ed Requirement ‘S’ For Natural Science.

 

Biology BIO244-04H ● Biology of Cells Laboratory (5702)

Wednesday 2:00-4:50PM ● SENG-328 ● Prof. Whitney Hable

One credit. A laboratory course focusing on molecular, cellular and microscopic procedures used to study the functions of cells. A special emphasis is placed on guiding students through the processes of 1) defining their own hypotheses about biological phenomena, 2) designing their own experiments to test these hypotheses, and 3) interpreting and evaluating data from the scientific literature. Corequisite: BIO 234 or permission of instructor. Fulfills Gen Ed Requirement ‘S’ For Natural Science.

 

Chemistry CHM155-02H/02HR ● Modern Chemical Principles I (6045/6046) 

MWF 11:00-11:50AM/Wednesday 3:00-3:50PM ● SENG-113/SENG-305 ● Prof. Timothy Su

Three credits. This first semester of the introductory chemistry course for science and engineering majors explores the principles of atomic and molecular structure, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gases, thermochemistry, and chemical bonding theory. This course is the beginning of a journey to the world of atoms and molecules. Students will experience the beauty of various chemical processes, witness the magic of the behaviors of matter and energy at subatomic levels, meet the challenges of solving problems which integrate quantum scales with classical applications, and more. Students in the Honors section will participate in the excitement of this course in an environment that builds on small classes and close interaction between students and faculty. The scope of coverage is more extensive than regular sections. Corequisite: CHM 161.  Fulfills Gen Ed Requirement ‘S’ For Natural Science. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 2A.

 

Chemistry CHM161-05H/05HL ● Introduction to Applied Chemistry I (6047/6048) 

Thursday 11:00-11:50AM/Thursday 12-1:50PM ● SENG-305/SENG-308 ● Prof. Russell Bessette

One credit. An introduction to chemical laboratory techniques and methods with emphasis on preparation, purification, and identification of compounds, elemental analysis, reaction stoichiometry, chemical ionization, thermochemistry, spectrophotometric techniques, and selective descriptive inorganic chemistry. Most experiments involve the identification of unknowns and statistical analysis of data. Corequisite: CHM 155.  Fulfills Gen Ed Requirement ‘S’ For Natural Science.

 

Economics ECO231-02H ● Principles of Microeconomics (7090)

TuTh 11:00AM-12:15PM ● LARTS-102 ● Prof. Merve Meral

Three credits. This course will introduce the fundamentals of microeconomic theory and practice. Students will learn about the method and impact of decision-making by firms, consumers, and workers. Specific topics include: supply and demand analysis, elasticity, short and long run costs, four major industry types and government intervention. The Honors course includes a greater focus on current examples and applications of the topics covered as well as more interactive work than the non-Honors course.  Fulfills Gen Ed Requirement ‘E’ For Ethics and/or ‘G’ for Global Awareness. Fulfills the University Studies Requirement 4A or 4B.

 

Engineering EGR111-05H/HL1 ● Intro Engineering & Computing (9002/9008)

MWF 2:00-2:50PM/Friday 3:00-4:50PM ● TEX--101/SENG-201 ● Prof. Tracie Ferreira

Three Credits. Introduction to engineering and computing with emphasis on development of problem solving skills through projects. The course is designed to increase the success of first year students.  It includes an overview of majors in the college, and the importance of engaged learning. Team work, written and oral communication skills are covered. Ethical issues in engineering and computing are discussed.

 

Engineering EGR497-02H ● Bioengineering Capstone Design I (7234)

TuTh 2:00-3:15PM ● TEX-102 ● Prof. Qinguo Fan

Two Credits. Professional and management activities of project engineering as a two course sequence. Students working in teams will integrate their learning by selecting a senior Bioengineering design project, leading to a written and oral presentation of a project proposal. Intellectual property rights, ethics and economic issues, as well as applicable regulations will be considered.

 

English ENL101-08H ● Critical Writing and Reading I (7593)

MWF 9:00-9:50 ● CVPA-105 ● Staff

Three Credits.  Writing in a variety of modes for various purposes and audiences; writing to communicate and to learn in the humanities. Rhetorical choices and revision strategies will be studied. Students will develop skill in critical reading necessary for thinking and writing.  Fulfills a Gen Ed Requirement for Critical Writing and Reading Tier I. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1A.

 

English ENL101-41H ● Critical Writing and Reading I (7617)

TuTh 12:30-1:45PM ● Tuesday: LARTS-203/Thursday: LARTS-110 ● Prof. Alexis Teagarden

Three Credits.  Writing in a variety of modes for various purposes and audiences; writing to communicate and to learn in the humanities. Rhetorical choices and revision strategies will be studied. Students will develop skill in critical reading necessary for thinking and writing.  Fulfills a Gen Ed Requirement for Critical Writing and Reading Tier I. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1A.

 

Finance FIN312-06H: Business Finance (12500)

TuTh 12:30-1:45 PM ● CCB-149 ● Prof. Zhaojin (Lily) Xu

Three Credits.  An introduction to the nature of financial management. The course presents the basic tools used in the decision-making process as they pertain to the acquisition, management and financing of current and long-term assets. Working capital policies, the time value of money, capital budgeting and debt and equity financing are discussed.  Pre-requisites ACT212 and ECO231 or permission from the instructor.

 

Honors HON101-01H ● Scholarship in Community (9331) Incoming Freshman Only

TuTh 9:30-10:45AM ● Honors Classroom (Library-213) ● Professor TBA

Three credits. Exploration of the relationship between scholarly inquiry and community. This course offers a multidisciplinary exploration of the interaction between individuals and communities, bringing in guest scholars from many fields of study to explore the relationship between community and diversity, the relationship between community ethical values and individual ethical values, and the individual responsibilities of scholars.  Fulfills Gen Ed ‘C’ Requirement for Cultural and Artistic Literacy, “D” for Diversity or “E” for Ethics.  Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1E and 4A & 5B.

 

Honors HON101-02H ● Scholarship in Community (9332)

MWF 12:00-12:50PM ● Honors Classroom (Library-213) ● Professor TBA

Three credits.  Exploration of the relationship between scholarly inquiry and community. This course offers a multidisciplinary exploration of the interaction between individuals and communities, bringing in guest scholars from many fields of study to explore the relationship between community and diversity, the relationship between community ethical values and individual ethical values, and the individual responsibilities of scholars. Fulfills Gen Ed ‘C’ Requirement for Cultural and Artistic Literacy, “D” for Diversity or “E” for Ethics.  Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1E and 4A & 5B.

 

Honors HON101-03H ● Scholarship in Community (9333)

TuTh 11:00AM-12:15PM  ● Honors Classroom (Library-213) ● Professor TBA

Three credits.  Exploration of the relationship between scholarly inquiry and community. This course offers a multidisciplinary exploration of the interaction between individuals and communities, bringing in guest scholars from many fields of study to explore the relationship between community and diversity, the relationship between community ethical values and individual ethical values, and the individual responsibilities of scholars. Fulfills Gen Ed ‘C’ Requirement for Cultural and Artistic Literacy, “D” for Diversity or “E” for Ethics.  Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1E and 4A & 5B.

 

Honors HON203-01H ● Creating Global Community (9334)

TuTh 2:00-3:15PM ● Honors Classroom (Library-213) ● Prof. Brian Williams

Three credits.

"Warlords, Special Forces, Spies and Terrorists. A History of American Counter-Terrorism Operations from the Invasion of Afghanistan to the war on ISIS."

This course provides a historical overview of U.S. special operations in the war on terror. It will focus primarily on military special ops and CIA covert operations in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iraq. Students will be introduced to such topics as the CIA's "robotic" drone war on the Taliban and Al Qaeda, Green Beret operations in Afghanistan, and Navy SEAL kill raids into tribal zones of  Pakistan. In the process it will familiarize students with the terrain, tribes, politics and history of the foreign lands where the U.S. military and intelligence community have been operating since 9/11. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4C.

 

Honors HON301-01H ● Honors Research Across the Disciplines (9335)

Monday 3:00-4:40PM ● Honors Classroom (Library-213) ● Prof. Brian Ayotte

Three credits. This seminar will prepare you to undertake your Honors thesis or project. You should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE you plan to begin work on your project. We will explore topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, you will identify your project supervisor and submit your initial project proposal.

 

Honors HON301-02H ● Honors Research Across the Disciplines (9336)

Wednesday 3:30-5:10PM ● Honors Classroom (Library-213) ● Prof. Kristen Sethares

Three credits. This seminar will prepare you to undertake your Honors thesis or project. You should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE you plan to begin work on your project. We will explore topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, you will identify your project supervisor and submit your initial project proposal.

 

Honors HON301-03H ● Honors Research Across the Disciplines (9337)

Tuesday 3:30-5:10PM ● Honors Classroom (Library-213) ● Professor TBA

Three credits. This seminar will prepare you to undertake your Honors thesis or project. You should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE you plan to begin work on your project. We will explore topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, you will identify your project supervisor and submit your initial project proposal.

 

Honors HON490-01H: Honors Thesis Project I (9338)

Independent Study ● Prof. Catherine Villanueva Gardner

Three credits. Research for and preparation of an honors thesis/project in partial fulfillment of the University Honors Program requirements for graduation as a Commonwealth Scholar.  Enrollment requires a permission number from the instructor.

 

Honors HON491-01H: Honors Thesis Project II (9339)

Independent Study ● Prof. Catherine Villanueva Gardner

Three credits. Research for and preparation of an honors thesis/project in partial fulfillment of the University Honors Program requirements for graduation as a Commonwealth Scholar.  Enrollment requires a permission number from the instructor.

 

Management MGT312-06H ● Legal Framework Business (5228)

MWF 1:00-1:50PM ● CCB-247 ● Prof. Michael Levinson

Three credits. Overview of the legal environment of business. Topics covered include contracts, agency and tort law; labor law; securities law. Students will develop a general background in the major aspects of the law as it affects the daily business environment.

 

Management Information Systems MIS101-05H ● The Business Organization (5168)

MonWed 1:00-1:50PM ● CCB-240 ● Prof. Elizabeth Oliveira

Three credits. A technology-based, cross-discipline course for first-year students, the first business core course. It introduces first-year business majors to the world of business and enriches their first year experience. It provides students with an overview of business, its environment and its subsystems (e.g. operations, marketing, accounting, finance and information systems); and enhances their computer and team-working skills. Through informational and advising experiences students make decisions in areas such as the selection of courses, a major, a career and the utilization of on-campus student resources.

 

Music MUS103-01H ● Introduction to World Music (5411)

MWF 10:00-10:50 AM ● CVPA-107 ● Prof. Jamie Eckert

Three credits. In this class, we will explore the musical traditions of various cultures with respect to their historical, social, and cultural backgrounds. We will also explore different approaches to musical organization, musical practice, and significant aspects of style within a world music setting. Historical and contemporary styles of world music studied include reggae, salsa, high life, rock, and calypso. Fulfills Gen Ed ‘C’ Requirement for Cultural and Artistic Literacy and ‘G’ for Global Awareness. Fulfills the University Study 3B requirement. 

 

Nursing NUR106-05H ● Intro to Professional Nursing (12319)

TuTh 8:00-9:15AM ● TEX-102

Three credits. Provides an introduction to the discipline of professional nursing. Learners examine their values and beliefs in relation to the basic concepts and behaviors that define the discipline. Promoting health, guiding persons through the health care experience and shaping the health care environment are presented as key processes to maximize health for individuals, families, groups and communities. Emphasis is placed on socializing the learner as an active, developing professional within the context and dimensions of the discipline. Learners will explore their relationship to self, individuals, families and communities as well as to the profession of nursing.

 

Nursing NUR214-02H ● Scholarly Inquiry (7496)

Thursday 2:00-4:50 PM ● SENG-109 ● Professor Kristen Sethares

Three credits. This knowledge foundation course, based on the American Nurses Association (ANA) (2004) Scope and Standards of Practice, is designed to introduce the baccalaureate nursing student to the process of scholarly inquiry. The course focuses on preparing students to be consumers and users of research. The scholarly development of the discipline is presented to provide a historical perspective. Specific connections between theory, components of the research process, and their application to evidence-based practice are explored using nursing exemplars. Strengths and weaknesses of various quantitative and qualitative research designs are discussed, as is their appropriateness for investigating various practice-based problems. For students in the College of Nursing only. Fulfills the University Studies 1C requirement.

 

Philosophy PHL215-04H ● Introduction to Ethics (9330)

MWF 10:00-10:50 AM ● Honors Classroom (Library-213) ● Prof. Timothy Nulty

Three credits. A critical examination of normative theories of obligation and value. It includes philosophical examination of some moral problems including but not limited to: abortion, euthanasia, death penalty, gender and sexual orientation equality, pornography and censorship, violence, and economic injustice. Numerous ethical theories will be discussed, including but not limited to: Cultural Relativism, Ethical Subjectivism, Ethical Egoism, Divine Command Theory, Utilitarianism, Rights Theories, Kantianism, Social Contract Theory, and Feminist Ethics. Fulfills Gen Ed ‘C’ Requirement for Cultural and Artistic Literacy and “E” for Ethics.  Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4A.

 

Physics PHY113-02H/HL/HR ● Classical Physics I (13121/13122/13123)

MWF 11:00-11:50AM/Wednesday 5:00-6:50PM/Wednesday 4:00-4:40PM ● SENG-117/SENG-207/TEX-101 ● Prof. Marguerite Zarrillo/TBA/TBA

Four credits. Calculus-based introduction to classical mechanics, emphasizing problem solving. Topics include 1- and 2-dimensional kinematics and dynamics; Newton's Laws of Motion; work, energy and momentum; and rotational motion and angular momentum. Many of these topics are further explored in laboratory experiments.

 

Production & Operation Mgmt POM212-05H Business Statistics (5188)

MWF 10:00-10:50AM ● CCB-240 ● Prof. Pinyarat Sirisomboonsuk

Three credits. Examines both descriptive and inferential statistics as applied to business. Topics include graphical and tabular methods of data presentation, probability theory and distributions, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, regression and forecasting. Emphasis is placed on concepts, applications, and the proper use of statistics to collect, analyze, and interpret data. Throughout this course students will use computer software to perform statistical analyses. Students will learn how to make decisions using facts and the techniques of data analysis. Students will also use the internet to supplement classroom learning.

 

Portuguese POR101-05H ● Elementary Portuguese (5869)

MWF 10:00-10:50AM ● LARTS-101 ● Prof. Dario Borim Jr.

Three Credits. Introduction to the foundations of the Portuguese language for students who have little or no knowledge of Portuguese. Students develop listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills. The course offers regular presentation of music and slides/websites depicting everyday life in Portuguese-speaking countries.  Fulfills Gen Ed Requirement ‘C’ for Cultural & Artistic Literacy or ‘G’ for Global Awareness.

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