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Honors Courses—Fall 2014

Anthropology ANT111-01H ● Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (4728)
TTH 9:30-10:45am ● SENG-108 ● Professor Isabel Rodrigues

Three credits.  An introduction to the basic concepts of social and cultural anthropology. Readings emphasize the comparative study of societies at different levels of socio-cultural integration and from different areas of the world. This may include a brief introduction to physical anthropology and archaeology.  Fulfills Gen Ed “G” Global Awareness Requirement and University Studies 4B and 4C requirements. 

 

Art History ARH125-04H ● Renaissance to Modern Art (5541)
MWF 10:00-10:50 ● CVPA-156 ● Professor Thomas Stubblefield

Three credits. This course explores the art and architecture of Western Europe 1250-1860, a period of exceptional change in the theory, practice, and purpose of art, as well as a primary touchstone for modern and contemporary arts. Class discussion is supported by short papers, quizzes, and field trips to exhibitions as appropriate, including one to New York City to tour the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  Fulfills Gen Ed ‘C’ Requirement for Cultural and Artistic Literacy and ‘G’ for Global Awareness. Fulfills the University Studies 3B requirement.

 

Biology BIO131-03HBiology of Organisms Laboratory I (13784)
Wednesday 2:00-4:50 ● SENG-331 ● Professor Guillermo Paz-y-Miño

One credit. Biology of Organisms Laboratory BIO-131H is the arena in which students’ analytical skills and critical thinking develop. BIO-131H is a challenging and enjoyable journey. As a consequence of exploring scientific hypotheses and working in unique experimental settings, students retain much information concerning the structure, function, and behavioral adaptations of living organisms. Most importantly, students become independent learners of biology and value both its philosophical and practical significance in today’s world. Students discover that nature is measurable and factual (=observable) and that biology provides them with naturalistic explanations about life processes and patterns. Students feel comfortable working in the laboratory and become skillful at using sophisticated equipment; they understand and apply statistical concepts, write scientific papers, design posters and multi-media-based oral presentations, participate in workshop-like experiences, and attend scientific meetings specifically organized for college audiences. Corequisite: BIO 121 or permission of instructor. Fulfills Gen Ed Requirement ‘S’ For Natural Science.

 

Biology BIO244-04H ● Biology of Cells Laboratory (13808)
Wednesday 2:00-4:50 ● SENG-328 ● Professor Whitney Hable

One credit. A laboratory course focusing on molecular, cellular and microscopic procedures used to study the functions of cells. A special emphasis is placed on guiding students through the processes of 1) defining their own hypotheses about biological phenomena, 2) designing their own experiments to test these hypotheses, and 3) interpreting and evaluating data from the scientific literature. Corequisite: BIO 234 or permission of instructor. Fulfills Gen Ed Requirement ‘S’ For Natural Science.

 

Chemistry CHM155-02H/02R1 ● Modern Chemical Principles I (13300/13301)
MWF 11:00-11:50/Wednesday 1:00-1:50 ● SENG-114/SENG-305 ● Staff 

Three credits. This first semester of the introductory chemistry course for science and engineering majors explores the principles of atomic and molecular structure, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gases, thermochemistry, and chemical bonding theory. This course is the beginning of a journey to the world of atoms and molecules. Students will experience the beauty of various chemical processes, witness the magic of the behaviors of matter and energy at subatomic levels, meet the challenges of solving problems which integrate quantum scales with classical applications, and more. Students in the Honors section will participate in the excitement of this course in an environment that builds on small classes and close interaction between students and faculty. The scope of coverage is more extensive than regular sections. Corequisite: CHM 161.  Fulfills Gen Ed Requirement ‘S’ For Natural Science. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 2A.

 

Chemistry CHM161-05H/05L1 ● Introduction to Applied Chemistry I (13311/13312)
Thursday 11:00-11:50/Thursday 12-1:50 ● SENG-305/SENG-308 ● Staff

One credit. An introduction to chemical laboratory techniques and methods with emphasis on preparation, purification, and identification of compounds, elemental analysis, reaction stoichiometry, chemical ionization, thermochemistry, spectrophotometric techniques, and selective descriptive inorganic chemistry. Most experiments involve the identification of unknowns and statistical analysis of data. Corequisite: CHM 155.  Fulfills Gen Ed Requirement ‘S’ For Natural Science.

 

Economics ECO231-02H ● Principles of Microeconomics (13108)
TuTh 12:30-1:45PM ● SENG-108 ● Professor Sarah Cosgrove

Three credits. This course will introduce the fundamentals of microeconomic theory and practice. Students will learn about the method and impact of decision-making by firms, consumers, and workers. Specific topics include: supply and demand analysis, elasticity, short and long run costs, four major industry types and government intervention. The Honors course includes a greater focus on current examples and applications of the topics covered as well as more interactive work than the non-Honors course.  Fulfills Gen Ed Requirement ‘E’ For Ethics and/or ‘G’ for Global Awareness. Fulfills the University Studies Requirement 4A.

 

English ENL101-08H ● Critical Writing and Reading I (14332)
MWF 9:00-9:50 ● LIB-213 ● Staff

Three Credits.  Writing in a variety of modes for various purposes and audiences; writing to communicate and to learn in the humanities. Rhetorical choices and revision strategies will be studied. Students will develop skill in critical reading necessary for thinking and writing.  Fulfills a Gen Ed Requirement for Critical Writing and Reading Tier I. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1A.

 

English ENL101-41H ● Critical Writing and Reading I (14360)
TuTh 12:30-1:45 ● Tuesday: CVPA-103/Thursday: Liberal Arts 202 ● Staff

Three Credits.  Writing in a variety of modes for various purposes and audiences; writing to communicate and to learn in the humanities. Rhetorical choices and revision strategies will be studied. Students will develop skill in critical reading necessary for thinking and writing.  Fulfills a Gen Ed Requirement for Critical Writing and Reading Tier I. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1A.

 

Finance FIN312-05H: Business Finance (15984)
Th 6:30-9:30pm ● LARTS-104 ● Staff

Three Credits.  An introduction to the nature of financial management. The course presents the basic tools used in the decision-making process as they pertain to the acquisition, management and financing of current and long-term assets. Working capital policies, the time value of money, capital budgeting and debt and equity financing are discussed.  Pre-requisites ACT212 and ECO231 or permission from the instructor.

 

Foundations FOU101-02H ● Visual Arts Freshman Colloquium I (4854)
Tuesday 4:00-5:15 ● CVPA-153 ● Professor Megan Abajian

One credit. A forum for faculty and visual artists to present current topics in the arts to new visual art students. It serves as an introduction to the resources of the College of Visual and Performing Arts and the University. In addition, the Colloquium hosts cultural events, providing opportunities for community activities for the CVPA.  Fulfills General Education ‘C’ Cultural Literacy Requirement; Fulfills University Studies Requirement 5B.

 

Foundations FOU125-05H ● 3D Workshop: Honors Sculpture (4878)
Monday & Wednesday 1:00-2:50 ● CVPA-005 ● Professor Stacy Latt Savage

Two credits. This course utilizes the tactile, physical and visual richness of three dimensional discipline areas to explore object making and related processes. Students will explore basic design in one of the following studio areas: ceramics, metals, sculpture or wood. The limited class sizes provide significant contact between faculty and students, and the inclusion in a studio community provides exposure to creative problem solving techniques and innovations used by advanced students. This course strives to help students to develop an awareness of what is meaningful and of personal interest to them, promoting idea generation and self-confidence. CVPA majors only.  Fulfills Gen Ed Requirement ‘C’ for Cultural and Artistic Literacy.

 

History HST101-02H ● History of Western Civilization I (14121)
TuTh 8:00--9:15 ● LARTS-333 ● Professor Robert Pontbriand 

Three credits. This is not your father’s Western Civilization survey course! Rather, it is a lively and interactive romp through the development of Western civilization from the time of the cave paintings of Lascaux to the stained glass windows of the Gothic cathedrals. The approach is multidisciplinary. You can expect to explore this history through a variety of media including art, music, literature, philosophy and religion. After all, history is not the mere march of events or facts through time but is, more importantly, an inquiry into their meaning. The intention is to facilitate an understanding of the process of historical continuity and acculturation and to develop an appreciation for the study of history and the humanities and to recognize their importance in your own life. You know what the oracle said: “Know thyself!” Fulfills Gen Ed Requirements ‘C’ for Cultural & Artistic Literacy and/or ‘G’ for Global Awareness.  Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4A.

 

History HST300-03H ● A Just War? Vietnam (15961)
TuTh 12:30-1:45 ● LARTS-206 ● Professor Mark Santow 

Three credits. Examines the history, politics and legacy of the U.S. war in Southeast Asia. Military strategy, policy debates, the experiences of soldiers, and domestic politics are examined, with the goal of understanding larger questions of American foreign policy past and present.  Fulfills Gen Ed Requirement ‘C’ for Cultural & Artistic Literacy.

 

History HST320-04H ● A Just War? World War I (15962)
ThTh 11:00-12:15 ● LARTS-206 ● Professor Robert Pontbriand 

Three Credits. Was World War I a 'just war'?  What does it mean to talk about justice, morality and law during wartime?  How have policymakers, philosophers, theologians and peace activists made sense of these questions over the centuries?  What can we learn from studying these moral and theological questions -- with WWI as a case studies -- that might help us to make sense of more recent dilemmas, like Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria, the use of drones, etc.?  Fulfills Gen Ed Requirement ‘C’ for Cultural & Artistic Literacy.

 

Honors HON101-03H ● Scholarship in Community (14183)
TuTh 2:00-3:15 ● Honors Classroom (Library 213) ● Professor Deborah Carlson

Three credits.  Exploration of the relationship between scholarly inquiry and community. This course offers a multidisciplinary exploration of the interaction between individuals and communities, bringing in guest scholars from many fields of study to explore the relationship between community and diversity, the relationship between community ethical values and individual ethical values, and the individual responsibilities of scholars. A service-learning component provides a practical application of these issues. Fulfills Gen Ed ‘C’ Requirement for Cultural and Artistic Literacy, “D” for Diversity or “E” for Ethics.  Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1E and 4A.

 

Honors HON301-01H ● Honors Research Across the Disciplines (14185)
Wednesday 10:00-11:45 AM ● Honors Classroom (Library 213) ● Prof. Kristen Sethares

Three credits. This seminar will prepare you to undertake your Honors thesis or project. You should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE you plan to begin work on your project. We will explore topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, you will identify your project supervisor and submit your initial project proposal. If you wish to begin work on your project in Spring 2015—an option that would allow you to have your project in hand by the time graduate school applications and job interviews begin in late 2015—then you should enroll in Honors 301 now! 

 

Honors HON301-02H ● Honors Research Across the Disciplines (14186)
Monday & Wednesday 2:00-2:50 ● Honors Classroom (Library 213) ● Prof. Brian Ayotte

Three credits. This seminar will prepare you to undertake your Honors thesis or project. You should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE you plan to begin work on your project. We will explore topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, you will identify your project supervisor and submit your initial project proposal. If you wish to begin work on your project in Spring 2015—an option that would allow you to have your project in hand by the time graduate school applications and job interviews begin in late 2015—then you should enroll in Honors 301 now!

 

Honors HON301-03H ● Honors Research Across the Disciplines (14187)
Wednesday 12:00-1:45 ● Honors Classroom (Library 213) ● Professor Avery Plaw

Three credits. This seminar will prepare you to undertake your Honors thesis or project. You should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE you plan to begin work on your project. We will explore topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, you will identify your project supervisor and submit your initial project proposal. If you wish to begin work on your project in Spring 2015—an option that would allow you to have your project in hand by the time graduate school applications and job interviews begin in late 2015—then you should enroll in Honors 301 now!

 

Honors HON490-01H: Honors Thesis Project I (14188)
Independent Study
● Professor Avery Plaw

Three credits. Research for and preparation of an honors thesis/project in partial fulfillment of the University Honors Program requirements for graduation as a Commonwealth Scholar.  Enrollment requires a permission number from the instructor.

 

Honors HON491-01H: Honors Thesis Project I (14189)
Independent Study
● Professor Avery Plaw

Three credits. Research for and preparation of an honors thesis/project in partial fulfillment of the University Honors Program requirements for graduation as a Commonwealth Scholar.  Enrollment requires a permission number from the instructor.

 

Music MUS103-01H ● Introduction to World Music (4881)
MWF 9:00-9:50 ● CVPA-107 ● Professor Jamie Eckert

Three credits. In this class, we will explore the musical traditions of various cultures with respect to their historical, social, and cultural backgrounds. We will also explore different approaches to musical organization, musical practice, and significant aspects of style within a world music setting. Historical and contemporary styles of world music studied include reggae, salsa, high life, rock, and calypso. Fulfills Gen Ed ‘C’ Requirement for Cultural and Artistic Literacy and ‘G’ for Global Awareness. Fulfills the University Study 3B requirement. 

 

Nursing NUR106-01H ● Introduction to Professional Nursing (13495)
Monday & Wednesday 3:00-4:15 ● Library 213 (Honors Classroom) ● Prof. Kerry Fater

Three credits. Introduction to the discipline of professional nursing. Learners examine their values and beliefs in relation to the basic concepts and behaviors that define the discipline. Promoting health, guiding clients through the health care experience and shaping the health care environment are presented as key processes to maximize health for individuals, families, groups and communities. Emphasis is placed on socializing the learner as an active, developing professional within the context and dimensions of the discipline. Learners will explore their relationship to self, individuals, families and communities as well as to the profession of nursing. Aspects of the AACN (2008) Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice have been incorporated into the course. For students in the College of Nursing only. Fulfills the University Studies 1E requirement. 

 

Nursing NUR214-02H ● Scholarly Inquiry (13510)
Thursday 2:00-4:50 ● SENG-109 ● Professor Kristen Sethares

Three credits. This knowledge foundation course, based on the American Nurses Association (ANA) (2004) Scope and Standards of Practice, is designed to introduce the baccalaureate nursing student to the process of scholarly inquiry. The course focuses on preparing students to be consumers and users of research. The scholarly development of the discipline is presented to provide a historical perspective. Specific connections between theory, components of the research process, and their application to evidence-based practice are explored using nursing exemplars. Strengths and weaknesses of various quantitative and qualitative research designs are discussed, as is their appropriateness for investigating various practice-based problems. For students in the College of Nursing only. Fulfills the University Studies 1C requirement.

 

Philosophy PHL215-04H ● Introduction to Ethics (13722)
TuTh 12:30-1:45 ● LARTS-109 ● Professor Keota Fields

Three credits. A critical examination of normative theories of obligation and value. A philosophical examination of some moral problems: abortion, euthanasia, death penalty, sexual equality, reverse discrimination, pornography and censorship, violence, and economic injustice.  Fulfills Gen Ed Requirement ‘C’ for Cultural & Artistic Literacy, ‘E’ for Ethics, or ‘W’ for Writing.  Fulfills the University Studies Requirement 4A.

 

Physics PHY182-01H ● Introduction to the Weather (15656)
TuTh 11:00-12:15 ● SENG-102 ● Professor John Silva

Three credits. The fundamentals of atmospheric science. Basic physical principles which affect the general circulation of the atmosphere and their relation to the day-to-day sequence of weather events are discussed. As part of the course, students generate short-term forecasts using real time information available by computer from the internet. Fulfills General Education Requirement ‘S’ for Natural Science & Technology and ‘G’ for Global awareness. Fulfills the University Studies 2A requirement.

 

Portuguese POR101-07H ● Elementary Portuguese (5114)
MWF 10:00-10:50 ● SENG-215 ● Professor Dario Borim Jr.

Three credits. Introduction to the foundations of the Portuguese language for students who have little or no knowledge of Portuguese. Students develop listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills. The course offers regular presentation of music and slides/websites depicting everyday life in Portuguese-speaking countries.  Fulfills Gen Ed Requirement ‘C’ for Cultural & Artistic Literacy or ‘G’ for Global Awareness.

 

Program: Operations Management POM333-06H Quantitative Business Analysis (15983)
TuTh 9:30-10:45
Dion Science & Engineering 110 ● Sharon Azadivar

Three Credits. Provides the student with an appreciation of the power and limitations of common managerial techniques used in the analysis of business problems requiring a quantitative decision-making approach. The emphasis is on a careful presentation of problem formulation, mathematical analysis, and solution procedures using examples involving business situations. Computer use is emphasized. Pre-requisites POM212 or MGT212 or by permission of Chairperson.

 

Psychology PSY101-11H ● General Psychology (14197)
TuTh 2:00-3:15 ● LARTS-217 ● Professor Robin Arkeson

Three credits. Psychology is a course for people who are interested in everything.  The study of the mind and behavior can help us understand ourselves as individuals, but it also has applications to fields ranging from education and medicine to marketing and criminal justice.  Topics include intelligence, personality, the brain and nervous system, perception, learning, memory, stress, social interaction, and psychological disorders.  Our emphasis throughout the semester will be on how and why we use the methods of science to pursue answers to psychology’s questions. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4A.

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