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Steven C. Zoni

Steven Zoni

Degree: Juris Doctor

Hometown: Southington, CT

"There are a limitless number of ways people may seek to do good, and perhaps none are more noble than any other. I have found myself in pursuit of law, and I will do my part in the world by being an advocate and counselor."
 
How does a law degree fit into your life's plan?

I think people have a responsibility to do good for the world in whatever way suits them best. There are a limitless number of ways people may seek to do good, and perhaps none are more noble than any other. I have found myself in pursuit of law, and I will do my part in the world by being an advocate and counselor.

Tell us about something you're involved with here and how it's changed you.

Last year I was an associate editor on the UMass Law Review. In April, I was selected to be editor-in-chief. The UMass Law Review publishes two books per year in print and online, with almost 40 editors.

Our dedicated editorial board, editorial staff, predecessors, two faculty advisors, and I have worked very hard over the past year to grow the Law Review with the same vigor that the school has grown. 

One challenge I've faced, as Editor-in-Chief, is explaining to folks around campus and in different departments exactly what the UMass Law Review is and how the organization fits into the university's structure. I've had a great time explaining it.

Law Review is sort of an odd institution: it is, to my knowledge, the only co-curricular student-run organization at UMass Dartmouth.

It is at the same time a student organization, a class, and a department. As a student organization, we represent UMass Law's commitment to scholarship and legal academia. As a class, we receive academic credit, but membership is by invitation only. As a department, we operate as a business that produces and markets a tangible product under the UMass brand.

Working with the Law Review's editorial board and editorial staff has also been a great experience and has been invaluable in learning how to be a member of a team. 

I look forward to doing a bit of teaching when the school year begins, and the newly chosen associate editors begin the Law Review class.

What makes UMass Law special?

UMass Dartmouth is a large institution with many people in its employ. In my travels around campus, and in my duties as editor-in-chief of the UMass Law Review, I have discovered some folks who just really know what they are doing. There is too much out there for any one person to know it all, but the collective of UMass Dartmouth must come pretty close.

 

If you need graphic design we have the Publications Office, if you need printing we have the Copy Shop, if you need networked drive space we have Data Access, if you need information technology we have CITS...we have people who do Publicity, Purchasing, Contracts, Facilities, Finance, Library Services, Digital Library Services, Web Services, Enterprise Systems, Catering...you name it.

 

I've had the privilege of working with people in each of these departments and I've yet to stump anyone with a question or run into a problem that someone didn't know how to solve. The collective is always greater than the individual, and UMass Dartmouth has one hell of a collection.

What advice do you have for incoming law students?

Learning the law is challenging. Learning to learn law is even more challenging. I advise incoming students to evaluate their study methods constantly by testing what they ought to have learned, to see if they have in fact learned it.

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