Schedule given for international film series at UMass Dartmouth

Whether your interest rests in tales with a supernatural bent, historical or quirky romances or indictments of social injustice, the fall 2001 International Film Series selections at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth will likely appeal to your taste. All films are shown on Fridays at 7:30 p.m. in the Visual and Performing Arts building (Group VI), room 153. Parking is available in lot 8/9 and admission is free.

Schedule given for international film series at UMass Dartmouth 

Whether your interest rests in tales with a supernatural bent, historical or quirky romances or indictments of social injustice, the fall 2001 International Film Series selections at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth will likely appeal to your taste. All films are shown on Fridays at 7:30 p.m. in the Visual and Performing Arts building (Group VI), room 153. Parking is available in lot 8/9 and admission is free. 

Professor Charles White has selected and will introduce all offerings, beginning with the September 14 showing of The Dress (The Netherlands, 1996), winner of the International Film Critics Award at the Venice Film Festival. The story, in Dutch, directed by Alex Van Warmerdam, traces the life of a dress and everyone who comes in contact with it. 

The rest of the schedule follows: September 28 Bitter Rice, (Italy, 1948) was nominated for an Academy Award in Screenwriting and packed theaters around the world-despite being banned by the Legion of Decency in the United States. Directed by Giuseppe De Santis, in Italian, the film explores the harsh conditions endured by women laboring in Italy's rice fields. 

October 12 Directed by Beeban Kidron, Swept from the Sea, (England, 1977) is based on Joseph Conrad's Amy Foster and traces the star crossed romance between an outcast and shipwreck survivor. 

November 2 The feature will be Honey and Ashes (Tunisia, 1996), directed by Nadia Fares, in French and Arabic, concerning three women in an Islamic country caught between religious tradition and modernity. 

November 9 The Harmonists (Germany, 1998), an award winner at several prestigious film festivals, is directed by Joseph Vilsmaier in German. The based-on-fact story of a popular musical group in the 1920's shows the challenges of three Jewish members as the Nazis came to power. 

November 30 Directed by Idressa Ouedraogo, in Moore, Yaaba, Grandmother (Burkina Faso, 1989) was winner of the International Critics Prize at Cannes. The film focuses on two young cousins and their relationship with a mysterious old woman who was cast out of her village as a witch. 

December 14 Afterlife (Japan, 1998), directed by Kore-Edo Hirokazu in Japanese, shows the spirits of the newly dead recalling their cherished memories to caseworkers at a counseling center staffed by bureaucrats. 

For more information, call 999-8285 or cwhite@umassd.edu.


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