Umass Dartmouth Instructor Pens Simpsons Episode

UMass Dartmouth continuing education instructor, Neal Boushell, has written an upcoming episode for FOX's award-winning animated series THE SIMPSONS. The episode is scheduled to air Sunday February 9, at 8 p.m. on FOX during the television industry's competitive February "sweeps" period.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: (310) 322-2253 nboushell @earthlink.net 

UMASS DARTMOUTH INSTRUCTOR PENS SIMPSONS EPISODE 

UMass Dartmouth continuing education instructor, Neal Boushell, has written an upcoming episode for FOX's award-winning animated series THE SIMPSONS. The episode is scheduled to air Sunday February 9, at 8 p.m. on FOX during the television industry's competitive February "sweeps" period. 

Boushell, an alumnus of UMass Amherst, whose TV writing credits include Howard Stern's SON OF THE BEACH, SABRINA THE TEENAGE WITCH, as well as ABC's BROTHER'S KEEPER, THE PRESTON EPISODES and BABY BLUES, taught his TV Writing Seminar at the UMass' Dartmouth campus last winter. It will be offered again on February 21-22. For more information contact the UMass Dartmouth Continuing Education Office at (508) 999-8071. 

"I wrote the episode right before last February's seminar. It takes about eight months or so for them to animate the episode and get it ready to air. It'll be great to finally see the finished product, Bushell said of the upcoming episode. 

The Simpsons, now in its 14~ season, has long been a favorite for the Massachusetts native. "It is consistently the best show on TV. The writing is brilliant. So when they assigned me an episode, I was thrilled. I just hope Boston doesn't have a massive snowstorm or wild car chase that preempts my episode." 

Boushell, who has not forgotten his local roots, enjoys coming back to the area to share his experience with local writers and expose them to the 'ins and outs' of Hollywood TV writing. His unique two-day seminar, "How To Write and Sell Your Sitcom", is run like an actual writers room where students sit around a conference table and are encouraged to participate in writing a sample scene. 

"The first night students are sent off to come up with funny real life situations. Those ideas are pitched to the class and then we incorporate a few of them into a scene. I believe it's always best to write from real life. Although I don't know how that applies to me writing The Simpsons, unless you consider my Homer-like appetite for drinking beer." 


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