Seminar Series

Owen Nichols gives talk at Dock-u-mentaries

SMAST Spring 2014 Seminar Series

The fall 2014 seminar series begins on January 29 and runs through April 30. 

Unless otherwise indicated, DEOS seminars are Wednesdays at 12:30 PM in Room 204 of SMAST I, New Bedford and simulcast to Room 325, SMAST II. Contact Prof. Miles A. Sundermeyer (msundermeyer@umassd.edu), Prof. Daniel MacDonald (dmacdonald@umassd.edu), or Prof. Wendell Brown (wbrown@umassd.edu) for information.

Unless otherwise indicated, DFO seminars are Wednesdays at 3:00 PM in Room 158 of SMAST II, AT&T Building, Fairhaven and simulcast to Room 108, SMAST I. Contact Prof. Saang-Yoon Hyun (shyun@umassd.edu) for information.

 

DATE

SPEAKER

DFO/DEOS

AFFILIATION

TITLE

Wednesday, January 29 Jon Hare DFO NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center Climate change and marine fisheries: Past, present, and future

Wednesday, January 29   NO DEOS SEMINAR    
Wednesday, February 5 Kenneth Foote DFO Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Acoustic quantification of marine organisms,
including a developing application with parametric sonar

Abstract

Wednesday, February 5 Postponed to May 2

Joe Iafrate and Stephanie Watwood DEOS (jointly with Marine System Seminar Series) Naval Undersea Warfare Center

Behavioral response of fish and sea turtles to anthropogenic activities

Abstract

Wednesday, February 12 Jason Boucher DFO DFO/SMAST/UMassD & Shanghai Ocean University Potential for range extensions of calanus copepods in the Arctic: A case study for 2012 
Wednesday, February 12 Wendell Brown DEOS DEOS/SMAST/UMassD Defining the Mid-Atlantic Cold Pool with ocean gliders 
Wednesday, February 19 Kevin Friedland DFO National Marine Fisheries Service, Narragansett Laboratory The Northeast Continental Shelf spring bloom with particular reference to plankton dynamics in the Gulf of Maine 
Wednesday, February 19   NO DEOS SEMINAR     
Wednesday, February 26 Gregory Skomal DFO Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries New insights into the ecology of the white shark in the western North Atlantic 
Wednesday, February 26   NO DEOS SEMINAR     
Wednesday, March 5 Jeff Kneebone DFO Zeptometrix Corporation/A.I.S., Inc. Movement patterns, coastal migration, and stock composition of adult striped bass Morone saxatilis tagged in Massachusetts coastal waters 
Wednesday, March 5 Rodney Rountree DEOS Fish Ecology/UMass Amherst

Sounds from the Amazon: Piranha and other river creatures 

Abstract

Wednesday,  March 12 Dorothy Jane Dankel  DFO
University of Bergen, Center for the Study of the Science and the Humanities
& the Institute of Marine Research 
Social network analysis of ICES' scientists and ICES bureaucrats: Do we have the institutional ecology that ecosystem science for advice demands? 
Wednesday, March 12 Michael Lomas  DEOS
Bigelow Lab for Ocean Sciences
Do we have the BIO in Biogeochemistry correct?
Wednesday, March 19  

NO SEMINARS - SPRING BREAK

   
Wednesday, March 26 Chrissy Petitpas DFO
DFO/SMAST/UMassD
Trophic interactions and PSP toxin transport in marine food chains during harmful algal blooms of Alexandrium fundyense
Wednesday, March 26 CANCELLED DUE TO INCLEMENT WEATHER Joe Iafrate and Stephanie Watwood DEOS (jointly with Marine System Seminar Series)
Naval Undersea Warfare Center

Behavioral response of fish and sea turtles to anthropogenic activities

Abstract

Wednesday, April 2 Anne Richards DFO
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

A shrimp's tale: Northern shrimp in the Gulf of Maine

Wednesday, April 2 Glen Gawarkiewicz DEOS
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Fronts and fish: Recent observations from Cape Hatteras

Wednesday, April 9 John W. Mandelman

DFO

New England Aquarium

Unwanted but not forgotten: The nature and importance of incidental (bycatch) mortality in fisheries

Wednesday, April 9 Mark Altabet DEOS
DEOS/SMAST/UMassD

Extreme nitrogen loss in a Peru mesoscale eddy

Wednesday, April 16 Sam Laney DFO
Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

New insight into polar phytoplankton through autonomous technologies

Abstract

Wednesday, April 16 Cindy Pilskaln DEOS        CANCELLED
DEOS/SMAST/UMassD

Climate change and acidification impacts on Gulf of Maine system

Wednesday, April 23 Kimberly Hyde DFO
NOAA/NMFS/NEFSC

The importance of phytoplankton size on modeling fisheries production

Wednesday, April 23 James Bird DEOS
Boston University

The drainage and rupture of interfacial bubbles

Abstract

Wednesday, April 30 Susan Inglis DFO
DFO/SMAST/UMassD

What causes gray meat in the Atlantic sea scallop in Georges Bank closed areas?

Wednesday, April 30 Malcolm Scully DEOS
Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Langmuir circulation and turbulence in Chesapeake Bay

Friday, May 2 Joe Iafrate & Stephanie Watwood DEOS
Naval Undersea Warfare Center

Behavioral response of Fish and Sea Turtles to Anthropogenic Activities

Wednesday, May 30 Dianne Quigley DEOS
Brown University

Presentation of SMAST course development for graduate training in marine science ethics


"Acoustic quantification of marine organisms, including a developing application with parametric sonar," Kenneth Foote, Senior Scientist, Applied Ocean Physics & Engineering, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. 

Abstract

Acoustic methods for studying marine organisms are summarily reviewed, with emphasis on capabilities derived from beamwidth, bandwidth, and calibration. These capabilities are present in a developing application of parametric sonar to Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus). This application is described from the concept of parametric sonar to use of its difference-frequency band, 1-6 kHz, in measuring herring in situ at sea, performance of a standard-target calibration, development of range compensation functions, and ongoing data postprocessing and analysis. Preliminary results of a comparison of echo data recorded synchronously by the parametric sonar and a scientific echo sounder with proximate transducers, and broader beamwidths at 18 and 200 kHz, are presented, demonstrating the absence of a behavioral response.

"Behavioral response of fish and sea turtles to anthropogenic activities," Joe Iafrate and Stephanie Watwood, NUWC Newport, Environmental Division. 

Abstract

Acoustic methods for studying marine organisms are summarily reviewed, with emphasis on capabilities derived from beamwidth, bandwidth, and calibration. These capabilities are present in a developing application of parametric sonar to Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus). This application is described from the concept of parametric sonar to use of its difference-frequency band, 1-6 kHz, in measuring herring in situ at sea, performance of a standard-target calibration, development of range compensation functions, and ongoing data postprocessing and analysis. Preliminary results of a comparison of echo data recorded synchronously by the parametric sonar and a scientific echo sounder with proximate transducers, and broader beamwidths at 18 and 200 kHz, are presented, demonstrating the absence of a behavioral response.

"Sounds from the Amazon: Piranha and other river creatures," Rodney Rountree, Fish Ecology. 

Abstract

The underwater soundscape of an upper tributary of the Amazon River was studied in a four week survey
within the Pacaya-Samiria National Reserve, Peru. Over 550 individuals representing over 70 species of
fishes were auditioned for sound production. Sounds were also recorded from the Amazonian manatee and pink river dolphin. Dr. Rountree’s talk will describe what it was like working in a remote part of the
Amazon, and present recordings of selected fishes, the Amazonian manatee, and the pink river dolphin.
Emphasis will be placed on a careful comparison of the sound characteristics of the different piranha species, which he shows can be distinguished for the first time.

"New insight into polar phytoplankton through autonomous technologies," Sam Laney, NBiology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. 

Abstract

Autonomous observing technologies are providing new and exciting insight into polar ocean ecosystems, both in and under sea ice cover. This seminar will introduce two technologies being newly applied to phytoplankton research in the Arctic: Imaging FlowCytobot (IFCB) and Ice-Tethered Profilers (ITPs). The first is an automated microscopy system that takes digital photographs of nano- and microphytoplankton, and a special ruggedized IFCB was developed for icebreaker use in NASA’s ICESCAPE program. IFCB data have now been collected from five cruises to date in ice-covered regions of the Bering and Chukchi Seas, and research results will be presented, particularly with respect to the massive 2011 under-ice bloom observed in the Chukchi Sea. The second, Ice-Tethered Profilers, are autonomous platforms originally developed for conducting physical oceanography research under perennial ice cover. The addition of new bio-optical sensor payloads allows ITPs to also examine seasonal and interannual aspects of under-ice algal assemblages. Eight such ‘bio-optical’ ITPs have been deployed to date, assessing algal biomass and other bio-optical properties of interest under perennial ice cover in the central Arctic Ocean and Beaufort Sea. Two of these have collected vertical profiles of algal biomass for an entire year, with temporal resolutions of up to 6 hours, the first such data set of its kind. These ITP-derived bio-optical observations will be presented and discussed, largely with respect to the new insight they provide into the timing, seasonality, and processes in under-ice algal assemblages.


"The drainage and rupture of interfacial bubbles," James BirdBoston University. 

Abstract

Thin free liquid films – such as soap bubbles - are ubiquitous, occurring in foams, carbonated beverages, and across the ocean surface.  This talk explores the dynamics that occur before and after these thin films pop.  Counter-intuitively, under certain conditions the film can fold to create smaller bubbles, each of which can be a source of marine aerosols.  Experiments and theory are used to explain these results, and the implications – ranging from glass manufacturing to climate dynamics – are discussed.

 

 

SMAST Fall 2013 Seminar Series

The fall 2013 seminar series begins on September 4 and runs through December 4. 

Unless otherwise indicated, DEOS seminars are Wednesdays at 12:30 PM in Room 204 of SMAST I, New Bedford and simulcast to Room 325, SMAST II. Contact Prof. Brian Howes (bhowes@umassd.edu) for information.

Unless otherwise indicated, DFO seminars are Wednesdays at 2:45 PM in Room 158 of SMAST II, AT&T Building, Fairhaven and simulcast to Room 108, SMAST I. Contact Prof. Saang-Yoon Hyun (shyun@umassd.edu) for information.

DATE

SPEAKER

DFO/DEOS

AFFILIATION

TITLE

Wednesday, September 4 Steve Cadrin DFO DFO/SMAST/UMassD Incorporating environmental change into stock assessment and fishery management

Wednesday, September 11 Ferdi Hellweger DEOS Northeastern University
 
Agent-based N cycle modeling 
Wednesday, September 18 Eduard Eichner DEOS Senior Water Scientist  Developing total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) and the Clean Water Act: Where law, regulation, and science meet
Wednesday, September 18 Marie C. Martin DFO NOAA Ecoystem Assessment Program Relating seabird breeding productivity to regime shift in the Gulf of Maine: Case of Atlantic puffin and arctic tern 
Wednesday, September 25 Jefferson Turner DFO DFO/SMAST/UMassD Zooplankton fecal pellets, marine snow, phytodetritus, and the ocean's biological pump
Wednesday, September 25 Supriya Chakrabarti DEOS University of Massachusetts Lowell An overview of optics and space technology for astrophysics and environmental studies at UMass Lowell
Wednesday, October 2 Yong Chen DFO School of Marine Sciences, University of Maine-Orono Use of computer simulation to improve fisheries management 
Wednesday, October 2 Camille David DEOS DEOS/SMAST/UMassD Eutrophication in a coastal pond: Role of tidal exchange and inlet migration
Wednesday, October 9   DFO SEMINAR CANCELLED    
Wednesday, October 9 Ron Etter DEOS Biology Dept., UMass Boston Evolution in the deep Atlantic: A molecular genetic perspective
Tuesday, October 15, 4:00 PM, Rm 108, SMAST I Chuck Ciany DEOS (jointly with Marine System Seminar Series) Raytheon Sonar signal processing and its application to commercial and military uses
Wednesday, October 16   NO DFO SEMINAR    
Wednesday, October 23 James Sulikowski DFO Marine Science Department, University of New England Has the New England commercial fishing industry gone to the dogs?
Wednesday, October 23 Pia H. Moisander DEOS Department of Biology, UMass Dartmouth New microbial contributors to the marine nitrogen fixation: Locations, habitats, and diversity
Wednesday, October 30, 3:00 PM Gordon Munro DFO Vancouver School of Economics/UBC Catch share schemes, cooperating fishermen, and the theory of dynamic coalition games
Wednesday, October 30   NO DEOS SEMINAR    
Wednesday, November 6 William Duffy DFO Population Dynamics Branch, NMFS/NEFSC/READ/PDB, Woods Hole  An analysis of the current method for ageing American shad (Alosa sapidissima), with a new validated method using otoliths
Wednesday, November 6 Dale Leavitt  DEOS Roger Williams University The oyster is dead ... long live the oyster
Wednesday, November 13 Kiersten L. Curti DFO Population Dynamics Branch, NMFS/NEFSC/READ/PDB, Woods Hole Age-Structured Multispecies Model
of the Georges Bank Fish Community
 
Wednesday, November 13 Sudip Majumder DEOS DEOS/Physics, SMAST, UMassD  Near-inertial kinetic energy budget of the mixed layer and the transition layer using data from the Arabian Sea mooring 
Wednesday, November 20 Vincent Saba DFO NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service Climate driven variability of phytoplankton biomass in the United States Northeast Shelf
Wednesday, November 20   NO DEOS SEMINAR    
Wednesday, November 27 NO SEMINARS - Thanksgiving recess begins      
Wednesday, December 4 Michael Judge DFO Manhattan College Invasion of the western North Atlantic shoreline by the exotic crab Hemigrapsus sanguineus: Lotka-Volterra competition model with discontinuous carrying capacity function captures invasion dynamics
Wednesday, December 4 David Clark DEOS Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Wave generated vorticity in the surfzone: helicopters, mega cusps, and the  Ring of Doom

 

CINAR Candidate Seminars

The CINAR seminars will be held at 2:00 p.m. in Room 158 of SMAST II, AT&T Building, Fairhaven, and will be simulcast to Room 108 of SMAST I, New Bedford.

DATE

SPEAKER

DFO/DEOS

AFFILIATION

TITLE

Thursday, August 15, 2013 Zhenming Su, CINAR Assistant/Associate Professor Candidate DFO Institute for Fisheries Research, University of Michigan Hierarchical modeling: A powerful framework for fisheries research

Monday, August 19, 2013 Richard Bell, CINAR Assistant/Associate Professor Candidate DFO National Marine Fisheries Service, Narragansett Lab Externally driven changes in the abundance of summer and winter flounder.
Wednesday, August 21, 2013 Gavin Fay, CINAR Assistant/Associate Professor Candidate DFO NOAA/NMFS/NEFSC, Woods Hole Confronting uncertainty: Quantitative approaches for managing living marine resources
Monday, August 26, 2013 John Wiedenmann, CINAR Assistant/Associate Professor Candidate DFO Institute of Marine & Coastal Sciences, Rutgers Sustainable management of marine resources: From the U.S. to Antarctica

 

 

SMAST Spring 2013 Seminar Series

The spring 2013 seminar series begins on January 30 and runs through May 1. 

DEOS seminars are Wednesdays at 12:30 PM in Room 204 of SMAST I, New Bedford and simulcast in Room 325, SMAST II. Contact Prof. Dan MacDonald (dmacdonald@umassd.edu) or Prof. Cynthia Pilskaln (cpilskaln@umassd.edu) for information.

DFO seminars are Wednesdays at 3:30 PM in Room 158 of SMAST II, AT&T Building, Fairhaven and simulcast in Room 204, SMAST I. Contact Prof. Pingguo He (phe@umassd.edu) for information.

Marine Economics seminars are held at 11:00 a.m. in Room 156 of SMAST II, AT&T Building, Fairhaven. Contact Prof. Dan Georgianna (dgeorgianna@umassd.edu) or Dr. Min-Yang Lee (min-yang.lee@noaa.gov) for information.

 

DATE

SPEAKER

DFO/DEOS

AFFILIATION

TITLE

January 30 Alex Haro DEOS/DFO US Geological Survey DEOS/DFO joint seminar hosted by DEOS: The “other” bioengineering: Fish passage research and the restoration of migratory fish populations

Abstract

January 30 DFO Seminar Cancelled DFO

 

 


February 6 John Walden Special (11:00 am, Room 2-156, SMAST II (AT&T) NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center Measuring fishery profitability change: An index number approach

Abstract

February 6

 

Sandy Shumway DFO University of Connecticut Mitigating coastal eutrophication – are filter-feeding shellfish the answer?

Abstract

February 6 Louis St. Laurent DEOS WHOI, Physical Oceanography The Kuroshio Current, internal waves, and turbulence in the Luzon Strait and South China Sea
February 13 Porter Hoagland DEOS/DFO WHOI Marine Policy Center DEOS/DFO joint seminar hosted by DEOS: Shoreline change in Massachusetts: Some policy perspectives
February 15 Greg Goss Special (11:00 am, Room 204, SMAST I) Univ. of Alberta Protecting our water through multidisciplinary research: The University of Alberta Water Initiative
February 20 Doug Zemeckis DFO DFO/SMAST/UMassD Stock identification of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in U.S. waters: An interdisciplinary approach
February 20   DEOS Seminar Cancelled    
February 27 Craig O'Connell DFO DFO/SMAST/UMassD Recent progress in elasmobranch electromagnetic repellent research
February 27 Melanie Fewings DEOS University of Connecticut Atmospheric Wind Relaxations and the Oceanic Response in the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem
March 6 Svein Sundby DFO IMR (Norway) Turbulence and plankton contact rates – Where are we 25 years later
March 6 Ke Chen DEOS WHOI Numerical investigation of the Middle Atlantic Bight shelf-break frontal circulation and its interaction with a warm core ring
March 11 Jim Hanlon (Halifax Marine Research Institute), Marlon Lewis (Dalhousie University), Doug Wallace (Dalhousie University) Special Seminar (11:30 am-1:00 pm, Rm 204, SMAST I)   Ocean technology activities in Nova Scotia, Canada
March 13 Hauke Kite-Powell DFO/DEOS WHOI DFO/DEOS joint seminar hosted by DFO: "The role of small-scale aquaculture in economic development in East Africa."
March 20   Spring Recess - NO Seminars    
March 26 Michel  Mahiques Special Seminar (12:30 pm, Rm 204, SMAST I) University of São Paulo  The geological record of the anthropogenic activity in SE Brazil: Three study cases 
March 27 Geret DePiper Marine Economics Series Northeast Fisheries Science Center Supporting ecosystem-based fisheries management through economic portfolios analysis 
March 27   DFO Seminar Cancelled    
March 27 B. N. Goswami Special Seminar (12:30 pm. Rm 108, SMAST I) Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology
 
The Indian summer monsoon in a changing climate - A  weakening present and an uncertain future 
April 3 Ann Bucklin DFO University of Connecticut Population connectivity of zooplankton: Ecological, evolutionary and oceanographic interpretations

Abstract

April 3 Kathryn Bisack Marine Economics Series  Northeast Fisheries Science Center  Economics of non-compliance with fisheries regulations 
April 5 (Fri.) John Marshall Special Seminar (12:30 pm, Rm 204, SMAST I) MIT Why is the ITCZ north of the equator?
April 10 Saang-Yoon Hyun DFO DFO/SMAST/UMassD The general production model with multiple survey data and without arbitrary constraints: Illustration with Georges Bank yellowtail flounder
April 10 Andone Lavery DEOS WHOI Acoustic scattering and propagation in strongly salt-stratified shear flows
April 10 Tammy Murphy Marine Economics Series Northeast Fisheries Science Center Socioeconomic surveys
April 17   Follow Monday's schedule - NO DFO Seminar    
April 17 Heidi Eastman DEOS Global Learning Charter School Port to Port: Placed-based Experiential Learning
April 17 Scott Steinback Marine Economics Series  Northeast Fisheries Science Center  Are survey respondents liars? Comparing hypothetical and real nonmarket valuation responses

Abstract

April 24 Geoff Cowles DFO SMAST/DFO Assessing computational models of trawl gear
April 24 Cindy Lee DEOS SUNY Stony Brook Future research in particle biogeochemistry: Technological challenges

Abstract

April 24 Eric Thunberg Marine Economics Series
 
Northeast Fisheries Science Center  Economic analysis of safety at sea 
May 1 Owen Nichols DFO DFO/SMAST/UMassD When, where, and sometimes why: Environmental effects on longfin inshore squid distribution and implications for fisheries management
May 1 Justin Kirkpatrick Marine Economics Series  Northeast Fisheries Science Center
 
Economics of wind energy on the East Coast 

"Future research in particle biogeochemistry: Technological Challenges,"  Cindy Lee, SUNY Stony Brook.

Global ocean acidification has captured the attention of many because of its potentially negative effects on organisms, particularly those that precipitate CaCO3.  One of the few natural processes that removes CO2 from the ocean’s surface waters is the sinking of particles to the deep sea.  These particles carry organic carbon with them that is derived from surface plants and animals in the ocean.  We and others have recently shown that the flux of mineral matter (opal, carbonates, and dust) is an excellent predictor of POC flux. We hypothesized that this strong statistical association may be driven by physical protection of organic matter by ballast minerals and/or the need for a minimum fraction of organic matter to maintain particle integrity during sinking. We measured organic and inorganic carbon, Si, Ca, Al and Ti, to characterize the organic and inorganic material in particles collected in the field. We also conducted laboratory experiments on aggregation and decomposition of mineral-forming and non-mineral-forming algae.  Our field and laboratory observations suggest that the association of POC and ballast material may be initiated by mineral-enhanced aggregation in surface waters.  Significant technological challenges stand in the way of a complete understanding.  Ocean acidifiction induced dissolution of CaCO3, one of the mineral ballasts in the ocean, could slow sinking of particles, thus slowing removal of CO2 from the atmosphere.


"Are Survey Respondents Liars? Comparing Hypothetical and Real Nonmarket Valuation Responses" Scott Steinback, Social Science Branch, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Resource economics is based on the assumption that people are able to make rational decisions about the values they place on nonmarket goods. Unfortunately, people are not routinely asked to value nonmarket goods such as clean air, water, open space, or endangered species, and therefore it is reasonable to question the ability of people to provide such estimates. In addition, research has shown that stated preferences often differ significantly from observed behavior, and there is no way of knowing whether responses to a hypothetical survey are consistent with what a respondent would do if actually given the opportunity. In spite of these concerns, nonmarket values derived from hypothetical surveys are used in public policy debates and by the courts, so they cannot be ignored. A simple classroom experiment will be conducted to demonstrate how easily people can be misled when asked to estimate the dollar value of a nonmarket good. In addition, a summary of a recent experiment conducted to evaluate the fundamental issue in properly estimating the total benefits of nonmarket goods will be presented – whether hypothetical statements are a credible indicator of actual preferences.   


"The 'Other' Bioengineering: Fish Passage Research and the Restoration of Migratory Fish Populations,"  Alex Haro, Research Ecologist (S. O. Conte Anadromous Fish Research Laboratory, US Geological Survey).

Abstract

Recent efforts to restore populations of migratory fishes to habitats and migratory routes impacted or altered by dams or other habitat fragmentation typically focus on provision of passage at specific barriers. Passage mitigation is usually adapted as an afterthought to existing structures, and has primarily relied on methodologies historically developed on a trial-and-error basis.  Fish passage efforts have traditionally emphasized technical or engineered solutions, or have compensated for poor passage conditions with trap-and-truck, stocking, or hatchery-based enhancements. Often these efforts are unsuccessful, and do not identify larger goals for effective population restoration, which include re-establishment of populations to pre-barrier or sustainable levels, genetic and phenotypic diversity, and consideration of complete life histories and migration behaviors. This presentation reviews the current status of fish passage technology and newer approaches to develop “bioengineering” solutions that incorporate fish behavior, locomotion, and ecology into traditional hydraulic and physical engineering, to arrive at more holistic and effective solutions for passage of fish in fragmented aquatic ecosystems.


"Mitigating Coastal Eutrophication - Are Filter-Feeding Shellfish the Answer?" Sandra E. Shumway, Department of Marine Sciences, University of Connecticut

Shellfish aquaculture and restoration continue to expand globally, as do eutrophication and harmful algal blooms.  Molluscan shellfish are among the most important of ecosystem engineers and providers of ecosystem services.  As such, restoration and aquaculture are both increasingly touted as means of habitat restoration, and as potential sources of mitigation for coastal degradation including eutrophication and erosion.  At some scales, shellfish restoration and establishment of sustainable molluscan shellfish aquaculture operations can mitigate effects of coastal development and eutrophication; however, the expectations and publicity are reaching unrealistic levels.  Harmful algal blooms impact coastal resources globally and their impacts can be devastating to local economies and environments.  In addition, the impacts of harmful algae on shellfish are highly species-specific and critical data regarding impacts of these toxic algae on critical life stages of the shellfish, and which will impact the potential for success of any restoration effort in the long term, are lacking. This presentation will open a discussion of the realistic expectations that could result from exploitation of bivalve molluscs, whether in restored reefs or in aquaculture farms, as long-term ecosystem engineers and mitigators of coastal degradation, and discuss the importance of strong and meaningful collaboration between scientists and industry. 


About Dr. Shumway:

Sandra E. Shumway, Research Professor, University of Connecticut, enjoys a varied career in research, outreach and education with primary focus on shellfish physiology, aquaculture, ecology, seafood safety and harmful algal blooms (HAB). She studied in Wales as a Marshall Scholar and received a Ph.D. in 1976 and a D.Sc. in 1992. She has published >150 primary research publications, several books and book chapters, and various outreach publications, and is the recipient of several awards, including Honored Life Member, National Shellfisheries Association, AAAS Fellow, Aldo Leopold Fellow, Honorary Fellow, University of Wales, and Fellow of the World Aquaculture Society.  She serves as Associate Editor, Journal of the World Aquaculture Society and as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Shellfish Research, the Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, and Reviews in Fisheries Science, and is Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Harmful Algae. Her most recent edited book, Shellfish Aquaculture and the Environment, was published in 2012 by Wiley-Blackwell Science Publishers.


"Measuring fishery profitability change: An index number approach," John Walden, Social Science Branch, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Tracking the financial well-being of vessels that depend on our nation’s  marine fishery resources is an important function of regulators.  This research demonstrates  how simple indices can be constructed and utilized to track the economic well-being of vessels  operating in the Northeast (USA) Multispecies (Groundfish) Fishery. The indices, which use both public  and private data, can separately track trends in inputs, outputs, and prices. For the Northeast Multispecies  Fishery, the indices reveal that the economic well‑being of the groundfish fleet has improved under catch share management through gains in productivity.


"Population connectivity of zooplankton: Ecological, evolutionary and oceanographic interpretations," Ann Bucklin, University of Connecticut

Population connectivity (i.e., exchange of individuals) is an essential characteristic of species, which affects their resilience to external pressures, including climate change and anthropogenic impacts.  Direct observation of dispersal is not possible for marine zooplankton – and many other organisms and environments – and a variety of genetic approaches have been employed.  Analysis of ‘genetic connectivity’ can reveal the impacts and effects of life history and behavior, biogeographical distribution, long-term climatic variation, and the geological history of the oceans. However, genetic analyses do not necessarily yield accurate understanding of ‘demographic connectivity’ (i.e., the degree to which population growth and vital rates are affected by dispersal).  Recent studies of population connectivity of zooplankton, especially copepods and euphausiids, are described. Ecological and evolutionary inferences are explored for studies over a range of spatial scales (from small-scale patchiness to the global ocean) and based on different genetic markers (DNA sequence divergence of the mitochondrial COI ‘barcode’ region and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms).


 

SMAST Fall 2012 Seminar Series

 

The fall 2012 seminar series begins on September 12 and runs through December 12. 

DEOS seminars are Wednesdays at 12:30 PM in Room 108 of SMAST I, New Bedford and simulcast in Room 325, SMAST II. Contact Prof. Dan MacDonald (dmacdonald@umassd.edu) or Prof. Cynthia Pilskaln (cpilskaln@umassd.edu) for information.

DFO seminars are Wednesdays at 3:30 PM in Room 158 of SMAST II, AT&T Building, Fairhaven and simulcast in Room 108, SMAST I. Contact Prof. Pingguo He (phe@umassd.edu) for information.

 

DATE

SPEAKER

DFO/DEOS

AFFILIATION

TITLE

 

 

 

 

 

September 12

Miles Sundermeyer

DEOS

SMAST/UMassD

Observations of Dye Dispersion in the Seasonal Pycnocline (1 to 6 days, 1 to 8 km)

September 12

DFO Faculty

DFO

SMAST/UMassD

DFO Faculty's Briefing on Current Research

September 14

 

Marcelo Dottori

Special (SMAST I, Rm 108, 12:00 pm)

Oceanographic Institute, Univ. of São Paulo, Brazil

Biogenic Ocean Resources from Brazilian Continental Shelf and Adjacent Oceanic Zone – An Overview of the CARBOM Project

September 19

Debbie Hutchinson

DEOS

U.S. Geological Survey

Frontier Geology in the Arctic Ocean: Results from Joint U.S.-Canada Mapping for Law of the Sea

September 19

 

DFO (ICES Conference – No Seminar)

 

 

September 26

Elisha Garcia

DEOS

U.S. Coast Guard Academy

TBA

September 26

Min-Yang Lee

DFO

SMAST/UMassD

A Bioeconomic Model of the Recreational Gulf of Maine Cod and Haddock Fishery

October 3

Amy Maas

DEOS

Dept. of Biology, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

The Sea Butterfly Effect: Using the comparative physiology of pteropods to make predictions about the effects of global climate change

October 3

Tim Werner

DFO

New England Aquarium

Innovative Approaches to Reducing Endangered Species Bycatch

October 10

Matthew Lackner

DEOS

UMass Amherst

Aerodynamic and Structural Modelling of Floating Offshore Wind Turbines

October 10

 

Follow Monday's Schedule - No DFO Seminar

   

October 17

 

DEOS Seminar Cancelled

 

 

October 17

Greg DeCelles

DFO

SMAST, UMassD

The Role of Acoustic Telemetry in Stock Identification

October 24

Jinbo Wang

DEOS

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Reconstructing the Ocean's Interior from Surface Data

October 24

Kathryn Kavanagh

DFO

Biology Dept., UMassD

Local Adaptation to Temperature in Fish Musculoskeletal Development

October 31

Pedro Fernandez Carrasco, University Politecnia de Madrid; George McBride; Sergy Goncharenko, Kiev, Ukraine; Ignacio Sepulveda, University of Valparaiso, Chile

DEOS

 

Talks from the 4th Annual Marine Renewable Energy Technical Conference

October 31

 

DFO Seminar Cancelled

 

 

November 7

Penny Vlahos

DEOS

University of Connecticut

Carbon Fluxes across Open Ocean Boundaries: "Mi carbon es su carbon"

November 7

David Blinksky

DFO

University of New Hampshire

Using Aquaculture Research to Inform Fisheries Management

November 14

Leila Hatch

DEOS

Stellwagen Nat'l Sanctuary

Whale Whisperer: Using Sound to Understand and Protect Whales in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary

November 14

Troy Hartley

DFO

Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Governing by Networks in Fisheries and EBM: It's Not Who You Know, but Who You Know Knows

Abstract

November 21

 

No Seminars - Thanksgiving Recess Begins

   
November 28   NO DEOS SEMINAR    
November 28 Kevin Stokesbury DFO SMAST The potential MA wind farm offshore location and fishing grounds
December 5   NO DEOS SEMINAR/SF AGU MTG    
December 5 Dan Goethel DFO SMAST

Reconsidering Historical Definitions of Overfishing and the Balance between Sustainable Use and Overexploitation

Abstract

December 12 Dr. Meg Estapa DEOS Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Autonomous, high resolution observations of particle flux in the oligotrophic ocean
December 12 Dr. Charles Henoch Special, 5:00 pm, Rm 108, SMAST I Naval Undersea Warfare Center 

Flow Control Using Hydrofoils and Propellers with Leading Edge Protuberances

Abstract

 

Governing by Networks in Fisheries and EBM: It's Not Who You Know, but Who You Know Knows, Troy Hartley (Virginia Institute of Marine Science). 

Abstract: With the increased emphasis on ecosystem-based approaches to managing fisheries and comprehensive integrated approaches to coastal and marine spatial planning, there are a suite of new policy and governance questions and issues society faces. How do we set priorities between sectors, among ecosystem services, and make trade-offs between social, economic and environmental objectives? In America’s local, state and federal government design, with specific jurisdictions, single-species or sector management objectives, and often challenged authorities, how do we design a governance system that advances integration and adaptive management? With advancements in network theory and analysis, public policy researchers are examining the structure and function of governance networks—the connectivity among individuals and organizations making and implementing decisions about a given government activity, e.g., fisheries management. This talk presents a series of governance network analyses conducted from 2007—2012 in the Gulf of Maine and Chesapeake Bay, focusing on fisheries, watershed, and local land use planning and management. By examining quantitative measures of network structure and function in these examples, we consider the opportunities and obstacles to the implementation of ecosystem-based management. Typical measures of networks relate to the degree of connectivity that may exist in the network structure (e.g., density, weighted average pathlengths, degree/number of communication links, network size) and centrality functions among network participants (e.g., betweenness, closeness).  While there are substantial fragmentation in networks and insufficient connections across jurisdictions and resource management to implement ecosystem-based management, there are also opportunities to advance the connectivity of nested governance networks.

 

Reconsidering Historical Definitions of Overfishing and the Balance between Sustainable Use and Overexploitation

by Daniel R. Goethel
(co-author Steven X. Cadrin, and Brian J. Rothschild)

Overexploitation and sustainability have been core concepts in the management of renewable resources since the 1600s.  Traditionally, these terms were directly linked to one another, so that overexploitation was truly unsustainable.  In fisheries management, the connection between them was severed when maximum sustainable yield became the guiding principal for many management bodies in the 1950s.  The current tendency is to consider fishery management a failure if a stock is ‘overfished’.  However, the abuse of such terms has led to inappropriate negative perceptions of management systems and the fishing industry.  By tracing the origins of the term ‘overfishing’ we demonstrate that modern management systems which link overfishing to an optimal fishing mortality reference point do not adhere to the traditional concept.  We suggest a revival of historical definitions of overfishing, based on short-term time horizons.  Such a reinterpretation would define sustainable use as harvesting up to the reproductive surplus of the resource, while overexploitation would be indicated by harvesting more than could be naturally replaced in a given year.  This approach would alter rebuilding plans to focus on increasing population biomass on a year to year basis as a means to achieve long-term reference point targets, while eliminating arbitrary rebuilding timelines.  By re-associating overfishing with values of fishing mortality that are unsustainable and lead to detrimental impacts on biomass, the inappropriate negative perception of fisheries can be avoided and, ultimately, instill incentive to promote conservative fishing techniques.

 

Flow Control Using Hydrofoils and Propellers with Leading Edge Protuberances, Dr. Charles Henoch, Naval Undersea Warfare Center

Abstract:  Experimental results of force, flow, and propulsion characteristics of foils with leading edge protuberances are presented.  The use of leading edge protuberances is inspired by the humpback whale’s pectoral flippers.  A variety of geometries and techniques have been explored, some with favorable results.

Brief biography:  Charles Henoch, Ph.D.has worked at NUWC for 21 years as an experimentalist in fluid dynamics.  He received a M.S. in Chemistry and a Ph.D. in  Applied Sciences, both from NYU.  His dissertation work involved liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence studies with Prof. Branover at Ben Gurion University in Israel.  At NUWC, he worked extensively at the Langley Tow Tank before it was closed, and on tests at the Large Cavitation Channel, the MIT water tunnel, the Brown University water channel, the Navy pier at San Clemente, the NUWC research tow tank, and the NUWC Superconducting Electromagnetic Thruster Lab.  He worked on range tests for supercavitating projectile tests and maintains and operates the NUWC 12” Research Water Tunnel.  He is NAVY certified in Laser Operations, Explosive Operations, and Crane Operations.



Mitigating coastal eutrophication – are filter-feeding shellfish the answer

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