The impact of teaching math

Even after almost 20 years in academia, Professor Sigal Gottlieb continues to enjoy her years of teaching, especially interacting and mentoring her students.

By: Leesa Prescod

Professor Sigal Gottlieb is a world-renowned mathematician and has been a professor at UMass Dartmouth for the last nineteen years. Even after almost 20 years in academia, Gottlieb continues to enjoy her years of teaching, especially interacting and mentoring her students.

 “At UMass Dartmouth, you get an opportunity to really mentor students; get to know them, get to know their work, get to challenge them by doing research with them – and that’s been an amazing thing,” said Gottlieb.

Diving into numbers

When not teaching or mentoring, Professor Gottlieb keeps herself busy and buried in issues surrounding numerical analysis and scientific computing. She is a founding director for the Center for Scientific Computing and Visualization Research, an associate editor for the SIAM Journal on Numerical Analysis and the Journal of Scientific Computing, and a leader in Strong Stability Preserving methods. She also works at the Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics, which is funded by the National Science Foundation.

“Everything I’m doing is in harmony one way or the other…all of those things have to do with the math that I love.” Gottlieb said. “None of them are in conflict with the other.”

A member of the UMassD math team

The relationship Gottlieb has built with her students and other faculty members in the math department is one of the many reasons why she loves working at UMass Dartmouth. She sees herself as part of a team, and when one student or faculty member succeeds, they all do.

“The biggest milestone is when your student or your colleague is succeeding because you’ve helped them, you’ve mentored them – to me, that’s a success,” said Gottlieb. “When you have people who tell you that they couldn’t have done it without you, it’s heartwarming, and I realize that what I’m doing is meaningful.”


College of Arts and Sciences, Departments Mathematics Dept, Faculty