Alexander Menrisky, PhD

Full Time Lecturer

English & Communication

Curriculum Vitae

508-999-8752

cogptkum{Bwocuuf0gfw

Liberal Arts 326


Education

2018University of KentuckyPhD in English
2014University of KentuckyMA in English
2012Ohio UniversityBS in Journalism

Teaching

  • First-Year Composition
  • Studies in Literature

Teaching

Programs

Teaching

Courses

Argument-focused course that introduces students to scholarly reading and writing strategies. Students practice widely-applicable methods of reading, writing, and revising arguments. Students read college-level arguments from diverse popular, public, and academic genres in order to develop their academic skills of analyzing single arguments, synthesizing multiple perspectives, and composing informed responses to an ongoing conversation.

Argument-focused course that introduces students to scholarly reading and writing strategies. Students practice widely-applicable methods of reading, writing, and revising arguments. Students read college-level arguments from diverse popular, public, and academic genres in order to develop their academic skills of analyzing single arguments, synthesizing multiple perspectives, and composing informed responses to an ongoing conversation.

Argument-focused course that introduces students to scholarly reading and writing strategies. Students practice widely-applicable methods of reading, writing, and revising arguments. Students read college-level arguments from diverse popular, public, and academic genres in order to develop their academic skills of analyzing single arguments, synthesizing multiple perspectives, and composing informed responses to an ongoing conversation.

Synthesis-focused course that builds on ENL 101. Students sharpen analytical skills by reading complex texts across public and academic genres. Students also create individual research questions, build college-level research skills, compose sophisticated syntheses, and revise their own argumentative, academic contributions to a defined conversation. Students leave the course prepared for intermediate reading and writing tasks in a broad variety of disciplines as well as with improved research skills and the reflective habits of successful, life-long learners.

Synthesis-focused course that builds on ENL 101. Students sharpen analytical skills by reading complex texts across public and academic genres. Students also create individual research questions, build college-level research skills, compose sophisticated syntheses, and revise their own argumentative, academic contributions to a defined conversation. Students leave the course prepared for intermediate reading and writing tasks in a broad variety of disciplines as well as with improved research skills and the reflective habits of successful, life-long learners.

Synthesis-focused course that builds on ENL 101. Students sharpen analytical skills by reading complex texts across public and academic genres. Students also create individual research questions, build college-level research skills, compose sophisticated syntheses, and revise their own argumentative, academic contributions to a defined conversation. Students leave the course prepared for intermediate reading and writing tasks in a broad variety of disciplines as well as with improved research skills and the reflective habits of successful, life-long learners.

Synthesis-focused course that builds on ENL 101. Students sharpen analytical skills by reading complex texts across public and academic genres. Students also create individual research questions, build college-level research skills, compose sophisticated syntheses, and revise their own argumentative, academic contributions to a defined conversation. Students leave the course prepared for intermediate reading and writing tasks in a broad variety of disciplines as well as with improved research skills and the reflective habits of successful, life-long learners.

A study of selected readings dealing with a special topic chosen by the instructor. Recent special topics include New England Literature, Children's Literature, the Artist in Literature, Black Music, and Black Literature. May be repeated with change of content. Cross-listed as BLS 200; LST 200.

Investigation of important North American contributions to human civilization, from Jazz and the airplane, to nuclear weapons and Cheese Wiz, to individual rights, the written constitution and the democratic republic. Topics could include Coming Down with the Blues; building the car, or the plane, Hollywood and the Invention of mass cinema; from inalienable rights to human rights; the Long 1960s as Cultural Revolution. May be repeated with change of content.

Preparation for Honors thesis or project. Students should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE they plan to begin work on the project. The course explores topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, students will identify their project supervisor and submit their initial project proposal.

Research

Research Interests

  • American Literature
  • Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Literature
  • Environmental Humanities
  • Multiethnic Literatures of the United States
  • Literary Theory and Criticism

Select publications

A. Menrisky (2019).
The Ecological Alternative: Edward Abbey, the New Left, and Environmental Authenticity
Criticism, 61, 1.

A. Menrisky (2018).
The Natural Death of Alexander Supertramp: Ecological Selfhood and the Freudian Rhetoric of Into the Wild
ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment

External links

Request edits to your profile