Brian Broadrose, PhD

Assistant Professor

Crime & Justice Studies

508-999-8765

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Liberal Arts 399B

Education

2014Binghamton UniversityPhD

Teaching

Programs

Teaching

Courses

American Indian history 1492- present. Students will learn about the colonization of the Americas through a discussion of the Trail of Tears, Wounded Knee and Sand Creek massacres, the Dawes Act, the Treaty of Ft. Laramie, Termination Polices, the Allotment Act, Assimilation polices and forced residential schooling, and the American Indian Movement. Contemporary issues including mascots.

Examination of the meaning of justice across a variety of contexts. The aim of this course is to develop historical, structural, social, and ethical analyses of justice applicable to contemporary social issues, institutional case studies, and social processes. Contradictions between theory and practice are highlighted.

Examination of the meaning of justice across a variety of contexts. The aim of this course is to develop historical, structural, social, and ethical analyses of justice applicable to contemporary social issues, institutional case studies, and social processes. Contradictions between theory and practice are highlighted.

American Indian history 1492- present. Students will learn about the colonization of the Americas through a discussion of the Trail of Tears, Wounded Knee and Sand Creek massacres, the Dawes Act, the Treaty of Ft. Laramie, Termination Polices, the Allotment Act, Assimilation polices and forced residential schooling, and the American Indian Movement. Contemporary issues including mascots.

An in-depth examination of the theoretical formulations, social movement contexts, and political praxes for the study of crime and justice. This will be pursued through a study of abolitionism across a variety of historical contexts and institutional and community settings in order to facilitate incisive critical thought on the most pressing social problems of our time.

An in-depth examination of the theoretical formulations, social movement contexts, and political praxes for the study of crime and justice. This will be pursued through a study of abolitionism across a variety of historical contexts and institutional and community settings in order to facilitate incisive critical thought on the most pressing social problems of our time.

Selected topics of contemporary relevance in the field of Crime and Justice studies. Active discussions, mini-lectures, filed simulations, student presentations, role-playing, guest speakers, and field observations may be utilized. A significant research paper will be required.

Investigation of special areas in Sustainable Studies. May be repeated with change of content.

Research

Research Interests

  • Archaeology and Inequality
  • Social Justice
  • The Construction of Historical Narratives
  • Discourse Analysis
  • Race/Racism

Select publications

  • Brian Broadrose (2015).
    Manifest Destiny and Anthropological Misappropriation
    The American Mosaic: The American Indian Experience
  • Brian Broadrose (2017).
    Memory Spaces and Contested Pasts in the Haudenosaunee Homeland
    Between Memory Sites and Memory Networks
  • Brian Broadrose (2011).
    To honor or to Steal: the Colonial Imperative and the misappropriation of American Indian Religions
    ABC-CLIO

Brian T. Broadrose received a PhD in Anthropology from Binghamton University and is an Assistant Professor in the Crime and Justice Studies Department at UMass Dartmouth. His areas of scholarly focus are archaeology and inequality, social justice, historical narratives that oppress, discourse analysis, social movements, race/racism, abolitionism, and the prison industrial complex. His most recent research involves challenging college campuses to decolonize; to rid these spaces of stereotypical, racist misrepresentations of Indigenous peoples that misinform and perpetuate racial hierarchies; to penetrate the silence surrounding the disproportionate representation of Indigenous bodies in colonial institutions like museums and the criminal justice system.

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