John Silva

John Silva, MS

Full Time Lecturer

Physics

508-999-8356

508-999-9115

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Science & Engineering 203C


Education

1980Bridgewater State UniversityMS in Earth Science
1970Fitchburg State UniversityBS in Earth Science

Teaching

Programs

Teaching

Courses

Continuation of PHY 101. The topics covered include heat and thermodynamics, vibrations, optics, electricity and magnetism. Non-calculus presentation.

Continuation of PHY 101. The topics covered include heat and thermodynamics, vibrations, optics, electricity and magnetism. Non-calculus presentation.

A laboratory-based course that develops scientific reasoning skills by the study of basic physical concepts. Students study properties of matter (mass, volume, density, etc.). This course is for students accepted to the university into the START Program.

This course studies current environmental issues and their relations to technological choices. For example, air and water quality are examined in relation to the use of various renewable and non-renewable energy resources. The course is non-mathematical and satisfies 3 credits of the Natural Science requirement.

This course studies current environmental issues and their relations to technological choices. For example, air and water quality are examined in relation to the use of various renewable and non-renewable energy resources. The course is non-mathematical and satisfies 3 credits of the Natural Science requirement.

This course studies current environmental issues and their relations to technological choices. For example, air and water quality are examined in relation to the use of various renewable and non-renewable energy resources. The course is non-mathematical and satisfies 3 credits of the Natural Science requirement.

This course studies current environmental issues and their relations to technological choices. For example, air and water quality are examined in relation to the use of various renewable and non-renewable energy resources. The course is non-mathematical and satisfies 3 credits of the Natural Science requirement.

This course studies current environmental issues and their relations to technological choices. For example, air and water quality are examined in relation to the use of various renewable and non-renewable energy resources. The course is non-mathematical and satisfies 3 credits of the Natural Science requirement.

A course for non-science majors covering Earth's origin and history; composition and structure of its interior, crust, oceans, and atmosphere; plate tectonics and sea floor spreading; seismology, volcanism and earthquakes; Earth's magnetism; forces shaping Earth's surface, faults and folds, erosion, sedimentation and weathering; and Earth's materials, such as soil, minerals and ores, and igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks.

Continuation of PHY 171, focusing on Earth's resources: rare and abundant metals and their uses, history of life on Earth, the fossil record; energy and fossil fuels; nuclear energy sources, uranium, plutonium, and deuterium; water and its distribution, rate of use, and pollution; atmospheric-oceanic circulation and heat balance; weather and climate; humanity as agent of change on Earth.

Research

Research Interests

  • Astronomy
  • Earth science education
  • Earth science/ geology
  • Planetary geology

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