Honors Courses—Spring 2018

UMASS DARTMOUTH HONORS PROGRAM

SPRING 2018 HONORS COURSES

 

Registration dates:

 

Please be aware that Spring registration for honors students will be opening on the following dates:

 

Monday, November 6, 2017 for students with 100 credits or more;

Tuesday, November 7, 2017 for students with 85 to 99.9 credits

Wednesday, November 8, 2017 for honors students with fewer than 85 credits.

Please register as early as you can to take advantage of the widest range of choice.

 

HONORS COURSES ● SPRING 2018

 

Biology--BIO 132-02H (4452) ● Introductory Biology Laboratory II
Tuesday 9:30-12:15pm in SENG-331 ● Professor Cynthia Ladino

1 Credit. Biology of Organisms Laboratory II is the arena in which students’ analytical skills and critical thinking continue to develop. This course is specifically conceptualized for Honors Biology majors. It is a challenging and enjoyable journey. As a consequence of exploring scientific hypotheses and working in unique experimental settings, students retain much information concerning the structure, function, and behavioral adaptations of living organisms. Most importantly, students become independent learners of biology and value both its philosophical and practical significance in today’s world. Students discover that nature is measurable and factual (=observable) and that biology provides them with naturalistic explanations about life processes and patterns. Students feel comfortable working in the laboratory and become skillful at using sophisticated equipment; they understand and apply statistical concepts, write scientific papers, design posters and multi-media-based oral presentations, participate in workshop-like experiences, and attend scientific meetings specifically organized for college audiences. Corequisite: BIO 122.  Prerequisite: BIO 121, 131.  Gen Ed “S”.

 

Bioengineering—BNG 255-02H (4691) ● Biology for Engineers
MWF 1-1:50pm in (TBA) ● Professor Tracie Ferreira

3 Credits. Principles of biology at the biology/engineering interface. The course will discuss biological principles that can inform an approach to engineering that is more in harmony with living systems and it will present engineering analyses of the structure and function of human tissue. Topics include an introduction to molecular biology, evolution and design, cell structure and function, the mechanics of tissues, sensing and signal transmission in the nervous system, biological energy generation and transduction, chemical detoxification and waste handling, and tissue defense mechanisms. This course fulfills University Studies requirement 2B – Science in the Engaged Community

 

Chemistry--CHM 156-02H/02R1 (4536/4537) ● Modern Chemical Principles II
MWF 10:00-10:50am in SENG 108, 1:00-1:50pm in SENG 108 ● Professor Melissa Silvia

3 Credits. A continuation of CHM 155. The details of the behavior of solids, liquids, & gases, the types of intermolecular forces, colligative properties, gaseous equilibrium, aqueous equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, kinetics, and nuclear chemistry are emphasized and discussed in light of modern scientific theories. For science and engineering majors. Non-honors sections are offered. Prerequisite: CHM 155 with a grade C or better, or permission of the instructor. Gen. Ed. “S”; College Distribution Requirement (where relevant): Natural Science.

 

Chemistry--CHM 162-05H/05L1 (4552/4553) ● Introduction to Applied Chemistry II
Thursday 11:00-11:50am in (TBA), 12:00-1:50pm in SENG-304 ● Professor Russell Bessette

1 Credit. Intermolecular forces; properties of gases, solids, and liquids; aqueous solutions; chemical equilibrium; acids, bases, and buffers; chemical reaction rates; electrochemistry; nuclear chemistry. Prerequisites: CHM 155 and 161 with grades C or better, or permission of instructor. The Honors sections of CHM 156 and 162 are corequisites, except for Chemistry majors, who take CHM 164 lab. Gen Ed S; College Distribution Requirement (where relevant): Natural Science.

 

General Engineering—EGR 498-02H (4688) ● Bioengineering Capstone Design II
TuTh 2-3:15pm in (TBA) ● Professor Qinguo Fan

2 Credits. Application of knowledge gained in various courses to the synthesis, analysis, and design of a system in a particular bioengineering field of interest selected by the student's team. The product proposed in EGR 497 will be built in EGR 498. This course in combination with EGR 497 fulfills University Studies requirements 5A and 5B.

 

English--ENL 102-04H (5508) ● Critical Writing & Reading II
Monday & Wednesday 2-2:50pm in Honors Classroom, LIB 213 & Friday 2:00-2:50 in (TBD) ● Instructor TBD

3 Credits. A course designed to advance the rhetorical skills and understanding developed in ENL 101. Critical reading of various literary genres and analytic and argumentative writing assignments enhance the student's awareness and use of effective language. Gen Ed: I – Tier 1; This course fulfills University Studies Requirement 1B – Foundations for Engagement: Critical Reading and Writing.

 

English--ENL 102-35H (5536) ● Critical Writing & Reading II

Tu & Th 11:00-12:15pm in TBA ● Instructor TBD

3 Credits. A course designed to advance the rhetorical skills and understanding developed in ENL 101. Critical reading of various literary genres and analytic and argumentative writing assignments enhance the student's awareness and use of effective language. Gen Ed: I – Tier 1; This course fulfills University Studies Requirement 1B – Foundations for Engagement: Critical Reading and Writing.

 

English--ENL 200-24H (6104) ● Studies in Literature: Imagining India
Tu & Th 12:30-1:45pm in Honors Classroom, LIB 213 ● Instructor Anupama Arora

3 Credits. Imagining India: Literature and Film. Once regarded as the “Jewel in the Crown” of the British Empire, India has been variously imagined in “the West” in different historical periods as a land of heat and dust, maharajahs, gurus and mystics, unparalleled riches and unmitigated poverty, Gandhi and non-violence, unruly crowds, cloistered women, and arranged marriages. In more recent years, “India” seems to be featured everywhere, whether in debates over outsourcing and globalization, as a rapidly growing economy, in the popularity of Bollywood films or yoga, or as Indo-chic. In this course we will explore the ways in which India has been represented, imagined, and constructed by Indians themselves and by others. Through reading a variety of texts (literary and visual) and situating them within specific socio-historical contexts, this course will explore how we have come to inherit a set of ideas about India that persist powerfully in literature and culture. Texts may include A Passage to India, Gandhi, The God of Small Things, Interpreter of Maladies, and Slumdog Millionaire, among others. This course fulfills University Studies Requirement 3A - The Cultural World: Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding.

 

Finance-FIN 312-04H (6157) ● Business Finance
Tu & Th 12:30-1:45pm in (TBA) ● Professor Zhaojin (Lily) Xu

3 Credits. An introduction to the nature of financial management. The course presents the basic tools used in the decision-making process as they pertain to the acquisition, management, and financing current and long-term assets. Working capital policies, the time value of money, capital budgeting, and debt and equity financing are discussed.

 

Honors-HON 101-01 (13897) ● Scholarship in Community

MWF 9:00-9:50am in Honors Classroom, LIB 213 ● Professor Avery Plaw

3 Credits.  Exploration of the relationship between scholarly inquiry and community. This course offers a multidisciplinary exploration of the interaction between individuals and communities, bringing in guest scholars from many fields of study to explore the relationship between community and diversity, the relationship between community ethical values and individual ethical values, and the individual responsibilities of scholars. Fulfills Gen Ed ‘C’ Requirement for Cultural and Artistic Literacy, “D” for Diversity or “E” for Ethics.  Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1E and 4A & 5B.

 

Honors--HON 202-01 (16545) ● Transformative American Ideas: Social Haunting

Monday & Wednesday 10-10:50am in Honors Classroom, LIB 213 ● Professor Tryon Woods

3 Credits. This course is a hybrid with Friday online.  It provides a critical introduction to thinking socially, rather than simply in terms of the individual. While the individual is the level of consciousness most privileged in Western social thought, we examine how certain taken-for-granted notions of society, history, and relations underpin how we think about who we are in the world. Central to this study will be the coupling of power and difference, especially as it is expressed in terms of race, gender, sex, and nation. We will work towards the understanding that there is nothing “natural” about the categories of social life or about the manner in which society is organized. The concept of social haunting will shape our discussions: we will tell ghost stories to help us see how the past is not over and how the future is already present. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4B.

 

Honors--HON 203-01 (6082) ● Creating Global Community: Intro to Accounting & Finance
Tu & Th 9:30-10:45am in Honors Classroom, LIB 213 ● Professor Michael Griffin

3 Credits. The course will provide basic accounting and finance concepts to nonbusiness majors.  Students will learn about the nature of business transactions and their impact on the results of operations and financial standing. Students will review the 10K (annual report) of a large international corporation.  The course will incorporate global business concepts such as foreign exchange and financing issues, and global business risks and opportunities. The course will also provide a review of personal finance issues including the analysis of an international mutual fund prospectus. Students will participate in discussions of timely Wall Street Journal articles (subscription required). The Honors Program will pay for the Wall Street Journal subscription.  The course will be a hybrid - offered on a TTH schedule with one day a week face-to-face and the other day online via my Courses (recorded lectures, videos etc.)  This course fulfills the University Studies Requirement 4C – Creating Global Community. 

 

Honors--HON 203-02 (16486) ● Creating Global Community: Visual & Material Cultures of Islam

Tu & Th 2:00-3:15pm in Honors Classroom, LIB 213 ● Professor Pamela Karimi

3 Credits. This course explores the visual and material cultures of the Islamic world from the 7th to the 21st centuries.  This course fulfills the University Studies Requirement 4C – Creating Global Community. 

 

Honors 301-02 (5162) ● Honors Research Across the Disciplines
Tuesday 3:30-5:10pm in (TBA) ● Professor Keota Fields

3 Credits. This seminar will prepare you to undertake your Honors thesis or project. You should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE you plan to begin work on your project. We will explore topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, you will identify your project supervisor and submit your initial project proposal. This course fulfills University Studies Requirement 4C – Creating Global Community.

 

Honors 301-03 (5163) ● Honors Research Across the Disciplines
Wednesday 3-4:40pm in (TBA) ● Professor Brian Ayotte

3 Credits. This seminar will prepare you to undertake your Honors thesis or project. You should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE you plan to begin work on your project. We will explore topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, you will identify your project supervisor and submit your initial project proposal. This course fulfills University Studies Requirement 4C – Creating Global Community.

 

Mechanical Engineering – MNE 280-01H (6158) ● Honors Enrichment

Wednesday 2-2:50 in TBD ● Professor Alex Fowler

1 Credit. Honors enrichment course supplementing a required sophomore level course in the Mechanical Engineering curriculum. This course is open to honors students who are enrolled in the affiliated required course in the mechanical engineering curriculum. The course provides coverage of more advanced topics and more in-depth analysis of concepts than are covered in the basic class. The course may include lecture and laboratory components at the instructor's discretion.

 

Physics – PHY 114-02H/02HL/02HR (6024/6025/6026) ● Classical Physics II

MWF 12-12:50/Th 4-5:50pm/Th 3-3:50pm in TBD/TBD/TBD ● Professor Marguerite Zarrillo/Professor Yun Hao/Professor Alec William Yonika

4 Credits. A calculus-based introduction to the concepts of electricity and magnetism. Study of electric and magnetic fields, electric potential, capacitance and inductance, elementary circuits, and electromagnetic oscillations. Laboratory experiments provide students with a solid understanding of basic DC circuit concepts and an introduction to AC circuits. Prerequisite: Honors Program Students Only  Prerequisite: PHY 111 or PHY 113; MTH 152 or MTH 154 or permission of instructor.  This course fulfills University Studies Requirement 2A – Science of the Natural World. Gen.Ed. S

 

Physics – PHY 152-01H (6030) ● Stars, Planets, and the Search for Extraterrestrial Life

TuTh 12:30-1:45pm in TBD ● Professor Alan Hirshfeld

3 Credits. Introduction to the science of the Sun and stars - their properties, energy-making processes, formation, and life histories - plus analysis of two societal issues: the viability of solar power (both sunlight and thermonuclear-fusion) as a means of terrestrial energy production; and the question of whether life exists on planets elsewhere in the universe. Prerequisite: Honors Program Students Only.  This course fulfills University Studies Requirement 2A – Science of the Natural World or 2B – Science in the Engaged Community.

 

Political Science-PSC 271-02H (13605) ● Topics in Political Theory: Politics of Evil

MWF 11-11:50am in TBD ● Professor Avery Plaw

3 Credits. The modern world, despite remarkable progress in many domains, has been haunted by evils of unprecedented scale – genocides, world wars, terrorism, totalitarianism, nuclear weapons, global environmental threats, etc.  But how can we make sense of such evils in a predominantly secular age?  This course examines the political evils of the last century - from tyranny and crimes against humanity to torture, slavery and the degradation of persons and the planet -  and explores modern insights into its meaning, from writers ranging from Machiavelli to Nietzsche, from Baudelaire and Marat to the Marquis de Sade, Robespierre, Hitler, Carl Schmitt and Hannah Arendt.  The course aims toward understanding evil today with an eye to learning how to address it.

 

 

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