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Master of Science in Nursing

Offered: Online

Program Overview

The Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) program prepares you to be a leader in nursing education and/or in global public health. Select 1 of 2 concentrations and earn your MSN completely online. Courses are asynchronous, which allows you to learn on your schedule.

Both concentrations provide the student with the foundational knowledge of healthcare systems, healthcare policy, nursing research methods, and healthcare informatics. You’ll apply your new knowledge in various practice settings, and a final capstone project prepares you for practice.

Concentrations

Nursing and Healthcare Education

Prepares you to become a nurse educator role in academic, clinical, or staff development setting. You’ll learn to design, implement, evaluate, and revise academic and continuing education programs for nurses. The curriculum integrates core masters-level concepts, advanced clinical foundations, and education-focused courses. It culminates in an intensive, individualized practicum of at least 112 hours. Each student collaborates with an experienced educator to grow in the role. View the Nursing and Healthcare Education program plan.

Global Public Health

Prepares you to work in the U.S. or in an international setting with diverse individuals, families, and populations, to improve healthcare outcomes through illness prevention, health promotion and health policy. The curriculum integrates core masters-level concepts, advanced clinical foundations, and global public health-focused courses. It culminates in an intensive individualized practicum of a least 112 hours. Each student collaborates with an experienced professional to grow in the role. View the Global Public Health program plan.

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Degree Requirements

MS students complete 39 academic credits that include a mentored capstone project that involves the design, implementation and evaluation of an evidence-based innovation in nursing practice.

The MS in Nursing program prepares nurse leaders who:

  • Synthesize specialized and diverse knowledge for application in nursing practice.
  • Apply principles of organization and system leadership to promote high quality and safe patient care to individuals, families, groups, and populations.
  • Apply quality principles within an organization.
  • Use evidence to guide nursing practice, address patient problems, and disseminate results.
  • Interpret information from a variety of healthcare technologies to integrate and coordinate care.
  • Influence health system and health policy to shape care delivery to individuals, families, groups, and populations across the lifespan.
  • Engage in inter-professional collaboration to promote health, guide clients through the illness experience, and improve the health system.
  • Apply the principles of culturally appropriate care to plan, deliver, manage, and evaluate healthcare individuals, families, groups, and populations.
  • Influence healthcare outcomes through nursing practice by integrating advanced scientific, clinical, and systems knowledge.

Faculty

Marilyn Asselin, Associate Professor, PhD; Reflection in practice, knowledge, utilization, leadership, reflective teaching practice, qualitative methodology

Maryellen Brisbois, Assistant Professor, PhD, APHN-BC; Breast cancer among Latinas, disparities

Joohyun Chung, Assistant Professor, PhD, MStat, RN; Online health information, biostatistics, informatics

June Andrews Horwitz, Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Research & Professor, PhD, RN, PMHCNS-BC, FAAN; Family mental health, perinatal/postpartum mental health disorders—specifically postpartum depression, mother

Sharon Keating, Lecturer, PHD(c), RN, FNP; Technology to improve weight loss in adolescents and emerging adult patients

Rayna Letourneau, Lecturer, PhD(c), RN; Staff Development, Transition to Professional Nursing Practice

Monika Schuler, Assistant Professor, PhD, RN, CNE; Chronic illness, nursing education, role development, transition to practice

Janet Sobczak, Associate Professor; PhD, PMHNP-BC, PPCNS-BC; Substance addictions, Eating disorders, Trauma, Women's mental health, Sexuality Qualitative methods, Mixed methods

Caitlin Stover, Interim Graduate Program Director of MS, Community Nursing Department Chair, Assistant Professor, PhD, RN, PHCNS-BC, CNE; Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender health care, community program planning and evaluation

Jennifer Viveiros, Assistant Professor, PhD; Memory, cognitive impairment, and education

Application requirements

Applicants to the MS program must:

  • Submit a statement of purpose (Minimum of 300 words)
  • Submit a resume
  • Submit official transcripts from all post-secondary institutions attended (regardless if a credential is earned or not)
  • Hold a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing from a program accredited by the NLNAC or CCNE.
  • Have a minimum GPA of 3.0 in undergraduate study. 
  • Registered Nurses with a bachelor degree in a related field may seek admission through the GAP program. (see below)
  • Hold a current license to practice professional nursing in the state where you live.
  • Submit 2 letters of reference that document competence, leadership and professional integrity in nursing practice.

Special Applicants

Registered nurses who hold a BS or BA degree in another field: the Graduate Admissions Program (GAP) is open to you. GAP students take NUR 503 Transitions Advancing Nursing Practice in which they complete a portfolio that documents how they attained undergraduate nursing program outcome objectives. With an academic advisor, students review this portfolio and select an additional courses that rounds out their undergraduate preparation.

RN-BS student with GPA of 3.3 or better: With a recommendation from the RN-BS program director, you may take up to 9 graduate credits (from among the following courses: NUR 500, 511, 520, or 547) that count as undergraduate electives. If the student applies and is admitted to graduate study immediately after receiving the BS degree, the courses will also count toward the MS degree.

Program Accreditation

The master’s degree in nursing at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036, 202.887.6791.

Program ineligible for residents of AL, AR, IA, KS, KY, LA, MD, NV, NM, MN, NC, TX, WA & WV

Due to regulations resulting from state legislation pertaining to the clinical experience requirement for this program, UMass Dartmouth MS Degree applicants with a permanent residence in Alabama, Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Nevada, New Mexico, Minnesota, North Carolina, Texas, Washington, and West Virginia are not being considered.

Learning Style: Online

Online courses are taught by UMass Dartmouth faculty and seasoned practitioners to provide high quality instruction and personal attention. Students have the flexibility to accommodate work and home responsibilities within the structure of defined assignment due dates.

 

Learn more about the College of Nursing

Learn more about University Extension: Online and Continuing Education

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