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Please be aware that Spring registration for honors students will be opening at 7:30am on the following dates:

  • Monday, November 7, 2022 for students with 100 credits or more;
  • Tuesday, November 8, 2022 for students with 85 to 99.9 earned credits;
  • Wednesday, November 9, 2022, early registration groups including honors students.

Please register as early as you can to take advantage of the widest range of choice.

Also, check back often! We will update this list with any additions or revisions.

Honors Courses ● Spring 2023

Art History - ARH 102-02H (14117)
Introduction to the History of Art

TuTh 2:00-3:15 PM
Location: CVPA 153
Prof. Anna Dempsey & Prof. Laura Franz

3 Credits. A study of the history of art and visual culture from the ancient world to the present. This course consists of a chronological study of painting, sculpture and architecture as well as photography, film and digital media, with an emphasis on the historical, cultural and social forces that shape these artifacts. Fulfills University Studies 3B.

Biology - BIO 122-03H (12312)
Introductory Biology II

MWF 1:00-1:50 PM
Location: SENG 102
Prof. Benjamin Winslow

3 Credits. A broad survey of the field of biology; second of a two semester sequence. This course explores the diversity of living things, examines topics in anatomy & physiology, and introduces the field of ecology. Emphasis is placed on the process of scientific discovery, evidence, and logic that support the concepts associated with these fields. Additional emphasis is placed on the use of biological information in society. Pre-requisite for 200, 300, and 400 level biology courses. Pre-requisite: BIO 121. Fulfills University Studies 2B.

Bioengineering - BNG 255-02H (11457)
Biology for Engineers

MWF 11:00-11:50 AM
Location: LIB 206
Prof. Laura Hanzly

3 Credits. Principles of biology at the biology/engineering interface. The course will discuss biological principles that can inform an approach to engineering that is more in harmony with living systems and it will present engineering analyses of the structure and function of human tissue. Topics include an introduction to molecular biology, evolution and design, cell structure and function, the mechanics of tissues, sensing and signal transmission in the nervous system,  biological energy generation and transduction, chemical detoxification and waste handling, and tissue defense mechanismsHonors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

Bioengineering - BNG 315-02H (11458)
Biomechanics

TuTh 12:30-1:45 PM
Location: TEXT 101
Prof. Lamya Karim

3 Credits. Introduction to the mechanical behavior of biological tissues and systems. Specific topics include: structure and function of biological tissues, mechanical properties of natural and prosthetic materials, and analysis of both rigid body and deformational mechanics applied to biological tissues including bone and soft connective tissues. Basic concepts of deformable body mechanics, including stress and strain analysis, viscoelasticity, muscle action and applications to common problems in orthopedic biomechanics. Honors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

Bioengineering - EGR 498-02H (13338)
Bioengineering Capstone Design II

TuTh 2:00-3:15 PM
Location: TEXT 101
Prof. Qinguo Fan

3 Credits. Application of knowledge gained in various courses to the synthesis, analysis, and design of a system in a particular bioengineering field of interest selected by the student's team. The product proposed in EGR 497 will be built in EGR 498. Pre-requisite: EGR 497.

Chemistry - CHM 156-02H (10719)
Modern Chemical Principles II

MWF 10:00-10:50 AM
Location: SENG 305
Prof. Melissa Silvia

3 Credits. A continuation of CHM 151. The details of the behavior of solids, liquids, & gases, the types of intermolecular forces, colligative properties, gaseous equilibrium, aqueous equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, kinetics, and nuclear chemistry are emphasized and discussed in light of modern scientific theories. For science and engineering majors. Pre-requisite: Chemistry majors. Honors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

Data Science - DSC 499-02H (10966)
Data Science Capstone Project II

W 3:00-4:50 PM
Location: LARTS 209
Prof. Donghui Yan

3 Credits. Application of knowledge discovery and data mining tools and techniques to large data repositories or data streams. This project-based capstone course provides students with a framework in which students gain both understanding and insight into the application of knowledge discovery tools and principles on data within the student's cognate area. This course is intended for data science majors only.

Electrical Engineering - ECE 202-02H (11493) / -02HL (11494)
Circuit Theory II

TuTh 9:30-10:45 AM / Th 2:00-3:30 PM
Location: SENG 212/SENG 218
Prof. Mohammad Karim

3.5 Credits. The second course in basic circuit theory and design. Topics include AC circuit steady-state response analysis, review of complex numbers, phasors, coupled inductors and ideal transformers, rms voltage and current, the maximum power transfer theorem, balanced 3-phase systems, and power and energy computations, applications of Laplace transforms to solutions of switched circuits and differential equations with initial conditions, stability, poles/zeros, Fourier transform, frequency response, Bode plots, network analysis, and equivalent circuits. Students are introduced to graphical convolution and Fourier series. Group classroom and project activities require design, implementation and measurement of filters and other circuits to meet design specifications. Pre-requisite: ECE 201; CPE/ECE Majors only.

English - ENL 102-04H (10456)
Critical Writing and Reading II

MWF 2:00-2:50 PM
Location: LARTS 102
Prof. Julie Bowman                                

3 Credits. Synthesis-focused course that builds on ENL 101. Students sharpen analytical skills by reading complex texts across public and academic genres. Students also create individual research questions, build college-level research skills, compose sophisticated syntheses, and revise their own argumentative, academic contributions to a defined conversation. Students leave the course prepared for intermediate reading and writing tasks in a broad variety of disciplines as well as with improved research skills and the reflective habits of successful, life-long learners. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1B.

English - ENL 102-40H (10838)
Critical Writing and Reading II

TuTh 12:30-1:45 PM
Location: LIB 226 (Honors Classroom)
Prof. Yuni Kim

3 Credits. Synthesis-focused course that builds on ENL 101. Students sharpen analytical skills by reading complex texts across public and academic genres. Students also create individual research questions, build college-level research skills, compose sophisticated syntheses, and revise their own argumentative, academic contributions to a defined conversation. Students leave the course prepared for intermediate reading and writing tasks in a broad variety of disciplines as well as with improved research skills and the reflective habits of successful, life-long learners. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1B.

English - ENL 102-41H (10839)
Critical Writing and Reading II

TuTh 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
Location: LIB 225 (Honors Classroom)
Prof. Yuan Zhang

3 Credits. Synthesis-focused course that builds on ENL 101. Students sharpen analytical skills by reading complex texts across public and academic genres. Students also create individual research questions, build college-level research skills, compose sophisticated syntheses, and revise their own argumentative, academic contributions to a defined conversation. Students leave the course prepared for intermediate reading and writing tasks in a broad variety of disciplines as well as with improved research skills and the reflective habits of successful, life-long learners. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1B.

English - ENL 200-12H (10495)
Topics in Literature: Family Drama in Film/Literature

MWF 1:00-1:50 PM
Location: LARTS 105
Prof. Tracy Harrison

3 Credits. The ideal of the perfect American family seems to be synonymous with the American Dream. A father who always knows best, a mother who seamlessly manages both home and hearth while doling out wisdom and nutritionally balanced meals with ease, and children who offer the promise of a better future. This depiction of the American home is an earthly Eden, available to all. Yet, if American dramatists are to be believed, the American family may more likely be living in “Dysfunction Junction” rather than “Pleasantville.” Together, we will explore the trope of the Postmodern American family, the ways in which dramatists challenge our idyllic notions of family, and how contemporary dramas both reflect and shape our culture. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 3A.

English - ENL 258-01H (10499)
Literary Studies: On Monsters

MWF 10:00-10:50 AM
Location: LIB 226 (Honors Classroom)
Prof. Caroline Gelmi

3 Credits. Vampires, goblins, werewolves. A monster is always more than just itself. Monsters embody a culture’s anxieties, fantasies, dilemmas, and desires. In this course, we’ll ask how literary representations of monsters engage a culture’s larger social, political, and psychological concerns. How does the monstrous signal the space of the forbidden and the unthinkable? How does monstrosity both invite and repel us, encouraging us to enter other worlds and ways of being while simultaneously barring our passage? By exploring these questions in novels, short stories, plays, poems, and films, students will gain and strengthen foundational skills in literary analysis, writing, and research. Our readings will include texts by Bram Stoker, Flannery O’Connor, Angela Carter, Edward Albee, Octavia Butler, Christina Rossetti, Terrance Hayes, Natalie Diaz, and Jordan Peele. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 3A.

English - ENL 266-06H (10516)
Technical Communication

MWF 9:00-9:50 AM
Location: LARTS 111
Prof. Joshua Botvin

3 Credits. Introduction to the technical communication skills used in business and industry. Students practice techniques for creating, managing, and presenting information in written, oral, visual, and electronic forms and use a variety of tools to research and collaborate on projects that relate to many audiences, purposes, forms, and formats of technical communication. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1C.

Finance - FIN 312-04H (11030)
Business Finance

MWF 10:00-10:50 AM
Location: DION 109
Prof. Zhenzhen Sun

3 Credits. An introduction to the nature of financial management. The course presents the basic tools used in the decision-making process as they pertain to the acquisition, management and financing of current and long-term assets. Working capital policies, the time value of money, capital budgeting and debt and equity financing are discussed. Pre-requisites: ACT212 and ECO231, at least Junior standing; Business Majors, Business Administration Minor, or Finance Minor. Honors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

Honors – HON 201-01 (12056): Knowing Ourselves
Friends with Benefits: Interpersonal Relationships & Health 

MWF 10:00-10:50 AM
Location: LIB 225 (Honors Classroom)
Prof. Brian Ayotte

3 Credits. Do you like to exercise with a friend? Do you like competing against other people? Have you noticed that families share health characteristics? Do you have people in your life that encourage you to be healthy (or unhealthy)? This course will examine how interpersonal relationships influence health behaviors and health outcomes. We will talk about topics such as social support, competition, shared environments, health-related social control, social networks, and other interesting and fun topics. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4A. Social Science course for CAS Distribution.

Honors – HON 201-02 (12058): Knowing Ourselves
Cyborgs and Avatars

TuTh 3:30-4:45 PM
Location: LIB 225 (Honors Classroom)
Prof. Eli Evans

3 Credits. Exploration of what it means to be human. This course will sample insights into ourselves from the unraveling of the human genome to the uncovering of the earliest evidence of distinctively human culture. Topics could include human consciousness, biomedical discoveries, defining human experiences, or the origins of human societies or belief sets. May be repeated with change of content. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4A. Humanities course for CAS Distribution.

Honors – HON 202-01 (12059): Transformative American Ideas
American Civil Rights Movement

TuTh 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
Location: LIB 226 (Honors Classroom)
Prof. Mark Santow

Spring 2023 Civil Rights Class and Trip (PDF)

3 Credits. Registration is by permission only. This course will involve an intensive and interdisciplinary exploration of the Black Freedom Movement of the 1950s and 60s, with a particular focus on the major direct action efforts of the Southern movement, the philosophical and strategic debates that shaped those actions, and the motivations and experiences of participants (especially students). Through coursework, guest speakers and a FREE spring break trip to Alabama (students just pay for their own food), students will learn directly from local participants in civil rights struggles. In the process, we will explore the continuing salience of race in American life, and our own civic and moral responsibilities to ‘bend the moral arc of the universe toward justice,’ as Dr. King once put it. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4B. Humanities Course for CAS Distribution.

To get permission to enroll, please respond to both questions in no more than 1-2 paragraphs and send to Professor Mark Santow (msantow@umassd.edu).

1. Why are you interested in this class, and the trip to Alabama that comes with it?

2. Please share two meaningful questions that you have that relate to this history and its meanings/legacies – and why you think those questions are significant.

Honors – HON 202-02 (12295): Transformative American Ideas
The Promise of Democratic Equality

MWF 11:00-11:50 AM
Location: LIB 225 (Honors Classroom)
Prof. Douglas Roscoe

3 Credits. Investigation of important North American contributions to human civilization, from Jazz and the airplane, to nuclear weapons and Cheese Wiz, to individual rights, the written constitution and the democratic republic. Topics could include Coming Down with the Blues; building the car, or the plane, Hollywood and the Invention of mass cinema; from inalienable rights to human rights; the Long 1960s as Cultural Revolution. May be repeated with change of content. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4B. Social Science Course for CAS Distribution.

Honors – HON 203-01 (12060): Creating Global Community
Transnational Terrorism

M 3:00-5:30 PM
Location: LIB 225 (Honors Classroom)
Prof. Dilshod Achilov

3 Credits. Exploration of globalization through its causes and in terms of the economic, cultural and political consequences that have followed. The course approaches this theme from both descriptive and normative perspectives. Topics could include the food revolution and changing global demographics, the internet and its impact on human interaction, climate crisis and global solidarity. May be repeated with change of content. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4C. Social Science Course for CAS Distribution.

Honors – HON 301-01 (12062)
Honors Research Across the Disciplines

Tuesday 3:30-5:10 PM
Location: LIB 226 (Honors Classroom)
Prof. Kristen Sethares

3 Credits. Preparation for Honors thesis or project. Students should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE they plan to begin work on their project. The course explores topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, students will identify their project supervisor and submit their initial project proposal. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4B.

Honors – HON 301-02 (12063)
Honors Research Across the Disciplines

Monday 3:30-5:10 PM
Location: LIB 226 (Honors Classroom)
Prof. Heloisa Alves

3 Credits. Preparation for Honors thesis or project. Students should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE they plan to begin work on their project. The course explores topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, students will identify their project supervisor and submit their initial project proposal. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4B.

Honors – HON 490-01 (12303)
Honors Thesis Project I

Independent Study
Prof. Amy Shapiro

3 Credits. Research for and preparation of an honors thesis in partial fulfillment of the University Honors Program requirements for graduation as a Commonwealth Scholar, for students whose honors research is multi-disciplinary. In the first semester, the student engages in intensive reading and research appropriate to the thesis or project, culminating in a formal written proposal. During the second semester, the student completes the writing and other preparation of the thesis or project. Students must present their results in an appropriate public forum. Students typically register to continue to complete HON 491, and an intermediate grade of IP can be given in HON 490 until there is a final grade for HON 491 which can then also be applied to HON 490. On the other hand, a final grade can be given at the conclusion of HON 490. Enrollment requires a permission number from the instructor.

Honors – HON 491-01 (12304)
Honors Thesis Project II

Independent Study
Prof. Amy Shapiro

3 Credits. Continuation of HON 490 thesis work. Enrollment requires a permission number from the instructor.

Management - MGT 312-05H (11064)
Legal Framework of Business

MWF 1:00-1:50 PM
Location: CCB 340
Prof. Michael Levinson

3 Credits. Overview of the legal environment of business. Topics covered include contracts, agency and tort law; labor law; securities law. Students will develop a general background in the major aspects of the law as it affects the daily business environment. Pre-requisites: Sophomore standing; Business Majors, Business Administration Minor, Sustainability Minor, or Material & Textiles MajorsHonors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

Mathematics - MTH 154-05H (13068)
Calculus for Applied Science and Engineering II

MW 12-12:50 PM and F 12:00-1:50 PM
Location: SENG 207
Prof. Adriano Marzullo

4 Credits. An intensive study of the techniques and applications of integration and infinite series. Topics include: techniques and applications of integration, improper integrals, infinite series (including convergence tests, the interval of convergence for power series, and Taylor series), an introduction to vectors, and parametric and polar equations. This is the second semester of the standard calculus sequence designed for Physics and Engineering majors in the integrated engineering curriculum. With your advisor's consent, this course may be repeated as MTH 152. This course fulfills the general education core requirements for Physics and Engineering majors who matriculated prior to Fall 2012 and has been approved by University Studies Curriculum for students matriculating in Fall 2012 or later. Pre-requisite: MTH 151 or 153. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1D.

Mathematics - MTH 211-02H (13929)
Analytical Geometry & Calculus III

TuTh 2:00-3:50 PM
Location: LARTS 210
Prof. Biyong Luo

4 Credits. An introduction to multivariable and vector calculus.  This is the third and the final semester of the Calculus sequence.  Topics cover 3-D analytical geometry, partial derivatives, directional derivatives, gradient, applications, multiple integrals, parameterized curves, and surfaces, vector fields, line and surface integrals, Green's theorem, flux and divergence, Stokes and the divergence theorems. Pre-requisite: MTH 152 or MTH 154.

Mathematics - MTH 212-05H (13069)
Differential Equations

MWF 9:00-9:50 AM
Location: LARTS 209
Prof. Cheng Wang

4 Credits. An introduction to ordinary differential equations and their analysis.  Topics cover first order linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equations, second order and higher order homogeneous and nonhomogeneous linear differential equations, the linear system of ordinary differential equations, qualitative analysis, numerical solutions, series solutions. Pre-requisite: MTH 152 or MTH 154.

Mechanical Engineering - MNE 280-01H (11635)
Honors Enrichment

Tu 11:00-11:50 AM
Location: SENG 102
Prof. Hangjian Ling

1 Credit. Honors enrichment course supplementing a required sophomore level course in the Mechanical Engineering curriculum. This course is open to honors students who are enrolled in the affiliated required course in the mechanical engineering curriculum. The course provides coverage of more advanced topics and more in-depth analysis of concepts than are covered in the basic class. The course may include lecture and laboratory components at the instructor's discretion.

Mechanical Engineering - MNE 380-01H (11637)
Honors Enrichment

Tu 2:00-2:50 PM
Location: SENG 108
Prof. Sankha Bhowmick

1 Credit. Honors enrichment course supplementing a required junior level course in the Mechanical Engineering curriculum. This course is open to honors students who are enrolled in the affiliated required course in the mechanical engineering curriculum. The course provides coverage of more advanced topics and more in-depth analysis of concepts than are covered in the basic class. The course may include lecture and laboratory components at the instructor's discretion.

Music – MUS 101-02H (13615)
Introduction to Music

TuTh 9:30-10:45 AM
Location: CVPA 105
Prof. Ronald Sherwin

3 Credits. Presents a basic music vocabulary and develops intelligent discrimination in the listener through study and analysis of outstanding works from Gregorian Chant to the present, including music of diverse cultures. Emphasis is also placed on the relationship of the historical development of music to parallel movements in art, drama, philosophical thought, etc. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 3B. Humanities course for the CAS Distribution.

Nursing – NUR 102-05H (11833)
Concepts of the Professional Nursing Role I

W 1:00-3:50 PM
Location: LIB 225 (Honors Classroom)
Prof. Marni Kellogg

3 Credits. Introduction to the discipline of professional nursing. Learners will examine individual values and beliefs in relation to foundational concepts, including the nursing process, and behaviors that define the discipline. The purpose of course is to build a foundation of self as nurse. The emphasis is placed on socializing the learner as an active, developing professional within the legal and ethical context and dimensions of the discipline. Learners will explore the relationship to self, individuals, families and communities utilizing the art of nursing presence and therapeutic communication. The AACN Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice were used to build this course. Pre-requisite: NUR 101.

Nursing – NUR 261-02H (11837)
Concepts of Scholarship for Nursing Practice

Th 2:00-4:50 PM
Location: LIB 226 (Honors Classroom)
Prof. Kristen Sethares

3 Credits. Introduction to the concepts of evidence-based nursing practice, informatics, and technology. Connections between these concepts, related theory, the research process, and application to evidence-based practice and health care quality are explored. Building on the concepts of communication, culture and diversity, legal and ethical issues, and professional behaviors, this course fosters growth in student writing skills by integrating writing assignments with critical thinking skills. This course is based on the American Nurses Association (2015) Scope and Standards of Practice. The AACN Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice were used to build this course. Pre-requisite: NUR 211 & NUR 212.

Nursing – NUR 356-04H (13516)
Concepts of Learning Through Engagement

M 11:00 AM-1:50 PM
Location: DION 115
Prof. Mary-Elizabeth Sosa

3 Credits. This course immerses the student in civic engagement and service learning. The purpose of this course is to apply the threaded nursing concepts of culture and diversity, communication, professional behaviors, health promotion/health protection, evidence-based practice, and leadership to creatively design and execute active learning projects to benefit the community.  Students use nursing specific knowledge to identify, formulate, and complete projects. Pre-requisite: NUR 270 & NUR 271.

Philosophy – PHL 215-05HB (12148)
Introduction to Ethics

Lecture: MWF 12:00-12:50 PM
Location: LIB 225 (Honors Classroom)
Prof. Jennifer Mulnix

3 Credits. A critical examination of normative theories of obligation and value. It includes philosophical examination of some moral problems including but not limited to: abortion, euthanasia, death penalty, gender and sexual orientation equality, pornography and censorship, violence, and economic injustice. Numerous ethical theories will be discussed, including but not limited to: Cultural Relativism, Ethical Subjectivism, Ethical Egoism, Divine Command Theory, Utilitarianism, Rights Theories, Kantianism, Social Contract Theory, and Feminist Ethics. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4A. Humanities course for the CAS Distribution.

Physics – PHY 114-02H/HL/HR (11589 / 11590 / 11591)
Classical Physics II

Lecture: MWF 12:00-12:50PM / Lab: W 2:00-3:50 PM / Recitation: W 1:00-1:50 PM
Location: SENG 201
Prof. Renuka Rajapakse

4 Credits. A calculus-based introduction to the concepts of electricity and magnetism. Study of electric and magnetic fields, electric potential, capacitance and inductance, elementary circuits, and electromagnetic oscillations. Laboratory experiments provide students with a solid understanding of basic DC circuit concepts and an introduction to AC circuits. Pre-requisite: PHY 111 or PHY 113, MTH 152 or MTH 154, or permission of instructor. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 2A. Honors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

Physics – PHY 213-02H/HR (11598 / 11599)
Classical Physics II

Lecture: MWF 1:00-1:50 PM / Recitation: M 2:00-2:50 PM
Location: SENG 108
Prof. Robert Fisher

4 Credits. A first course in modern physics designed for engineering and physics students. It deals with light waves, diffraction, interference, and basic matter waves with an introduction to the Schrödinger equation. Basic atomic and nuclear physics is also introduced. Pre-requisite: PHY 112 or PHY 114, MTH 152 or MTH 154, or permission of instructor. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 2A. Honors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

Physics – PHY 490-02H (13636)
Senior Thesis

Independent Study
Professor: TBA

3 Credits. Intensive individual work on an experimental or theoretical problem in physics under the guidance of a faculty member. The special project is to be selected at the beginning of the senior year. Credit will be assigned in the second semester.

Sustainability – SUS 101-03H (12106)
Principles of Sustainability

TuTh 9:30-10:45 AM
Location: LARTS 105
Prof. Rachel Kulick

3 Credits. Fundamental principles of Sustainability. Goal is to provide a larger context for topics covered in sustainability courses. Topics covered include: What is Sustainability?, Climate Change and Environmental Challenges, systems Thinking/Systems Analysis, "Natural" Systems and Function, Human Interactions with Natural Systems, Ethics, and Values. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4A or 4C. Social Science course for the CAS Distribution.

University Studies