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Honors Courses—Spring 2020

Please be aware that Fall registration for honors students will be opening on the following dates:

Monday, April 6, 2020 for students with 100 credits or more;
Tuesday, April 7, 2020 for students with 85 to 99.9 earned credits
Wednesday, April 8, 2020, early registration groups, including honors students

Please register as early as you can to take advantage of the widest range of choice.

Honors Courses Fall 2020

Economics – ECO 231-02H (11236)
Principles of Microeconomics

TuTh 11:00AM-12:15PM
Location TBD
Prof. Merve Meral

3 Credits. Survey of the American economy focusing on markets, the price system, and resource allocation. Price determination in competitive and imperfectly-competitive markets. Applications in agricultural economics, legal prices, excise taxes, labor market issues, advertising, technological change, pollution and the environment, public goods, antitrust policy, international trade, and alternative economic systems. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4A or 4B.

Engineering – EGR 111-05H/05HL (11871/11872)
Intro Engineering & Computing

MWF 2:00PM-2:50PM/Friday 3:00PM-4:50PM
Location TBD
Staff

3 Credits. Introduction to engineering and computing with emphasis on development of problem-solving skills through projects. The course is designed to increase the success of first year students. It includes an overview of majors in the college, and the importance of engaged learning. Team work, written and oral communication skills are covered. Ethical issues in engineering and computing are discussed.

Engineering – EGR 497-02H (14334)
Bioengineering Capstone Design I

TuTh 2:00-3:15PM
Location TBD
Prof. Qinguo Fan

2 Credits. Professional and management activities of project engineering as a two course sequence. Students working in teams will integrate their learning by selecting a senior Bioengineering design project, leading to a written and oral presentation of a project proposal. Intellectual property rights, ethics and economic issues, as well as applicable regulations will be considered.

English – ENL101- 08H (10969)
Critical Writing and Reading I

MWF 9:00AM-9:50AM
Location TBD
Staff

3 Credits. Argument-focused course that introduces students to scholarly reading and writing strategies. Students practice widely-applicable methods of reading, writing, and revising arguments. Students read college-level arguments from diverse popular, public, and academic genres in order to develop their academic skills of analyzing single arguments, synthesizing multiple perspectives, and composing informed responses to an ongoing conversation. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1A.

English – ENL101 TBD
Critical Writing and Reading I

Time TBD
Location TBD
Staff

3 Credits. Argument-focused course that introduces students to scholarly reading and writing strategies. Students practice widely-applicable methods of reading, writing, and revising arguments. Students read college-level arguments from diverse popular, public, and academic genres in order to develop their academic skills of analyzing single arguments, synthesizing multiple perspectives, and composing informed responses to an ongoing conversation. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1A.

English – ENL101 TBD
Critical Writing and Reading I

Time TBD
Location TBD
Staff

3 Credits. Argument-focused course that introduces students to scholarly reading and writing strategies. Students practice widely-applicable methods of reading, writing, and revising arguments. Students read college-level arguments from diverse popular, public, and academic genres in order to develop their academic skills of analyzing single arguments, synthesizing multiple perspectives, and composing informed responses to an ongoing conversation. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1A.

Finance – FIN 312-06H (11703)
Business Finance

TuTh 11:00AM-12:15PM
Location TBD
Prof. Zhaojin (Lily) Xu

3 Credits. An introduction to the nature of financial management. The course presents the basic tools used in the decision-making process as they pertain to the acquisition, management and financing of current and long-term assets. Working capital policies, the time value of money, capital budgeting and debt and equity financing are discussed. Pre-requisites ACT212 and ECO231 or permission from the instructor.

Honors – HON 101 (13880)
Scholarship in Community (Blended Course)

MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM
Honors Classroom (Library)
Professor TBD

3 Credits. Exploration of the relationship between scholarly inquiry and community. This course offers a multidisciplinary exploration of the interaction between individuals and communities, bringing in guest scholars from many fields of study to explore the relationship between community and diversity, the relationship between community ethical values and individual ethical values, and the individual responsibilities of scholars. Prerequisite: incoming first-year students only. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1E and 4A.

Honors – HON 101 (13881)
Scholarship in Community (Blended Course)

MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM
Honors Classroom (Library)
Professor TBD

3 Credits. Exploration of the relationship between scholarly inquiry and community. This course offers a multidisciplinary exploration of the interaction between individuals and communities, bringing in guest scholars from many fields of study to explore the relationship between community and diversity, the relationship between community ethical values and individual ethical values, and the individual responsibilities of scholars. Prerequisite: incoming first-year students only. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1E and 4A.

Honors – HON 101 (13882)
Scholarship in Community (Blended Course)

TuTh 12:30-1:45PM
Honors Classroom (Library)
Professor TBD

3 Credits. Exploration of the relationship between scholarly inquiry and community. This course offers a multidisciplinary exploration of the interaction between individuals and communities, bringing in guest scholars from many fields of study to explore the relationship between community and diversity, the relationship between community ethical values and individual ethical values, and the individual responsibilities of scholars. Prerequisite: incoming first-year students only. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1E and 4A.

Honors – HON 101 (13883)
Scholarship in Community (Blended Course)

TuTh 9:30AM-10:45PM
Honors Classroom (Library)
Professor TBD

3 Credits. Exploration of the relationship between scholarly inquiry and community. This course offers a multidisciplinary exploration of the interaction between individuals and communities, bringing in guest scholars from many fields of study to explore the relationship between community and diversity, the relationship between community ethical values and individual ethical values, and the individual responsibilities of scholars. Prerequisite: incoming first-year students only. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1E and 4A.

Honors – HON 301-01B (10724)
Honors Research Across the Disciplines (Blended Course)

Wednesday 3:00PM-4:40PM
Honors Classroom (Library)
Prof. Catherine Villanueva Gardner

3 Credits. Preparation for Honors thesis or project. Students should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE they plan to begin work on their project. The course explores topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, students will identify their project supervisor and submit their initial project proposal. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4C.

Honors – HON 301-02 (10725)
Honors Research Across the Disciplines (Blended Course)

Monday 3:00PM-4:40PM
Honors Classroom (Library)
Professor TBD

3 Credits. Preparation for Honors thesis or project. Students should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE they plan to begin work on their project. The course explores topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, students will identify their project supervisor and submit their initial project proposal. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4C.

Honors – HON 301-03 (10726)
Honors Research Across the Disciplines (Blended Course)

Tuesday 3:30PM-5:10PM
Honors Classroom (Library)
Professor TBD

3 Credits. Preparation for Honors thesis or project. Students should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE they plan to begin work on their project. The course explores topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, students will identify their project supervisor and submit their initial project proposal. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4C.

Honors – HON 490-01 (10727)
Honors Thesis Project I

Independent Study
Prof. Catherine Villanueva Gardner

3 Credits. Research for and preparation of an honors thesis in partial fulfillment of the University Honors Program requirements for graduation as a Commonwealth Scholar, for students whose honors research is multi-disciplinary. In the first semester, the student engages in intensive reading and research appropriate to the thesis or project, culminating in a formal written proposal. During the second semester, the student completes the writing and other preparation of the thesis or project. Students must present their results in an appropriate public forum. Students typically register to continue to complete HON 491, and an intermediate grade of IP can be given in HON 490 until there is a final grade for HON 491 which can then also be applied to HON 490. On the other hand, a final grade can be given at the conclusion of HON 490. Enrollment requires a permission number from the instructor.

Honors – HON 491-01 (10728)
Honors Thesis Project II

Independent Study
Prof. Catherine Villanueva Gardner

3 Credits. Research for and preparation of an honors thesis in partial fulfillment of the University Honors Program requirements for graduation as a Commonwealth Scholar, for students whose honors research is multi-disciplinary. In the first semester, the student engages in intensive reading and research appropriate to the thesis or project, culminating in a formal written proposal. During the second semester, the student completes the writing and other preparation of the thesis or project. Students must present their results in an appropriate public forum. Students typically register to continue to complete HON 491, and an intermediate grade of IP can be given in HON 490 until there is a final grade for HON 491 which can then also be applied to HON 490. On the other hand, a final grade can be given at the conclusion of HON 490. Enrollment requires a permission number from the instructor.

Management – MGT 312-04H (11642)
Legal Framework Business

MWF 1:00PM-1:50PM
Location TBD
Prof. Michael Levinson

3 Credits. Overview of the legal environment of business. Topics covered include contracts, agency and tort law; labor law; securities law. Students will develop a general background in the major aspects of the law as it affects the daily business environment.

Management Information Systems – MIS101-06H/06L1 (11594/11595)
The Business Organization

MoFr 1:00PM-1:50PM/Wednesday 1:00PM-1:50PM
CCB-115/341
Professor TBA

3 Credits. A technology-based, cross-discipline course for first-year students, the first business core course. It introduces first-year business majors to the world of business and enriches their first year experience. It provides students with an overview of business, its environment and its subsystems (e.g. operations, marketing, accounting, finance and information systems); and enhances their computer and team-working skills. Through informational and advising experiences students make decisions in areas such as the selection of courses, a major, a career and the utilization of on-campus student resources.

Mechanical Engineering – MNE 380-01H (11969)
Honors Enrichment

Wednesday 3:00PM-3:50PM
Location TBD
Prof. Wenzhen Huang

1 Credit. Honors enrichment course supplementing a required junior level course in the Mechanical Engineering curriculum. This course is open to honors students who are enrolled in the affiliated required course in the mechanical engineering curriculum. The course provides coverage of more advanced topics and more in-depth analysis of concepts than are covered in the basic class. The course may include lecture and laboratory components at the instructor's discretion.

Music – MUS 103-01H (14165)
Introduction to World Music

MWF 9:00AM-9:50AM
VPA-103
Prof. Jamie Eckert

3 Credits. Explores the musical traditions of various cultures with respect to their historical, social, and cultural backgrounds. This course also explores different approaches to musical organization, musical practice, and significant aspects of style within a world music setting. Fulfills the University Studies 3B requirement.

Nursing – NUR 214-02H (12161)
Scholarly Inquiry

Tuesday 2:00PM-4:50 PM
Dion-114
Prof. Shannon Avery-Desmarais

3 Credits. The AACN (2008) Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice guided the development of this course which introduces the baccalaureate nursing student to the process of scholarly inquiry. The course focuses on preparing students to be consumers and users of research. Specific connections between theory, components of the research process, and their application to evidence-based practice are explored using research exemplars. Strengths and weaknesses of various quantitative and qualitative research designs are discussed, as is their appropriateness for investigating.
For students in the College of Nursing only. Fulfills the University Studies 1C requirement.

Philosophy - PHL 215-03H (14077)
Introduction to Ethics (Blended Course)

MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM
Location TBD
Prof. Keota Fields

3 Credits: A critical examination of normative theories of obligation and value. It includes philosophical examination of some moral problems including but not limited to: abortion, euthanasia, death penalty, gender and sexual orientation equality, pornography and censorship, violence, and economic injustice. Numerous ethical theories will be discussed, including but not limited to: Cultural Relativism, Ethical Subjectivism, Ethical Egoism, Divine Command Theory, Utilitarianism, Rights Theories, Kantianism, Social Contract Theory, and Feminist Ethics. Fulfills the University Studies 4A requirement.

Physics – PHY 109-02H (12065)
Freshman Seminar I

TuTh 11:00AM-12:15PM
Location TBD
Prof. Alan Hirshfeld

3 Credits: The Physics Freshman Seminar (Honors) is designed to involve first-year and transfer physics majors in the Honors program, as well as Honors students with an interest in physics, in discussions, presentations, and hands-on activities related to fundamental and applied physics, the physics major, and the role of physics in addressing various societal issues and needs. In this course you will engage in a variety of tasks, which might include: in-class, team-based problem-solving activities; hands-on, exploratory projects involving measurement, graphing, and elementary mathematical analysis of experimental data; practice writing a technical report; discussions and written and/or oral presentations on topics such as the history and development of physics and the impact of physics on society. In addition to the above, Honors students will (i) write a paper exploring the societal impact of any chosen sub-field of physics and (ii) complete several quantitative homework assignments related to topics introduced in class. There may also be guest presentations by physics faculty members on opportunities for students to become involved in their research programs. Some of the concepts and analytical methods you will review here will be useful in the technical courses you are required to take in the physics major. Also discussed are the physics major curriculum and requirements; interrelationship between physics and allied fields of study, such as mathematics and astronomy; and institutions, interactions, and communications within the professional physics community. Fulfills the University Studies requirement 1E: Foundation for Learning through Engagement

Physics – PHY 113-02H/HL/HR (11918/11919/11920)
Classical Physics I

MWF 1:00-1:50PM/Thursday 4:00-5:50PM/Thursday 3:00-3:50PM
Location TBD/TBD/TBD
Prof. Renuka Rajapakse/Professor TBA/Professor TBA

4 Credits. Calculus-based introduction to classical mechanics, emphasizing problem solving. Topics include 1- and 2-dimensional kinematics and dynamics; Newton's Laws of Motion; work, energy and momentum; and rotational motion and angular momentum. Many of these topics are further explored in laboratory experiments. Prerequisite: MTH 151 or MTH 153, or permission of instructor

Political Science – PSC284-02H (14303)
Model UN

MWF 10-10:50 AM
Location TBD
Prof, Peter Sandy-Thomas

3 Credits: Examination of the role played by the United Nations in dealing with important issues and challenges in the arena of international politics. Students perform the role of delegates representing individual countries and, through the format of simulations, learn about the statecraft of foreign policy, diplomacy and international relations. Following completion, students will be eligible to participate in the University’s Model UN Club that attends the NMUN conference in New York City every spring. Fulfills University Studies 4C and 5B (the latter being contingent on attending the conference) and International Politics Concentration in Political Science

Production & Operation Management – POM 212-06H (11612)
Business Statistics

MWF 9:00AM-9:50AM
Location TBD
Professor TBD

3 Credits. Examines both descriptive and inferential statistics as applied to business. Topics include graphical and tabular methods of data presentation, probability theory and distributions, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, regression and forecasting. Emphasis is placed on concepts, applications, and the proper use of statistics to collect, analyze, and interpret data. Throughout this course students will use computer software to perform statistical analyses. Students will learn how to make decisions using facts and the techniques of data analysis. Students will also use the internet to supplement classroom learning. Prerequisite: MTH 146

University Studies

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