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Please be aware that Fall registration for honors students will be opening at 7:30am on the following dates:

  • Monday, April 4, 2022 for students with 100 credits or more;
  • Tuesday, April 5, 2022 for students with 85 to 99.9 earned credits;
  • Wednesday, April 6, 2022, early registration groups including honors students.

Please register as early as you can to take advantage of the widest range of choice.

Honors Courses ● Fall 2022

Accounting - ACT 211-09H (9642)
Principles of Accounting I

MWF 2:00-2:50 PM
Location: CCB 240
Prof. Osborne

3 credits. Accounting concepts and procedures, studied through the analysis, classification, recording, and summarizing of business transactions. Financial statements are introduced and shown to be a source of essential information for management and others outside of the business. Ethical issues in financial reporting are considered. Pre-requisite: Sophomore Standing.

Art History - ARH 200-05H (11795)
Theory & Criticism of Art & Design

TuTh 11:00 AM -12:15 PM
Location: CVPA 156
Prof. Karimi

3 credits. A thematic approach to the systematic study of art and architecture. Through intensive reading and discussion, students will work with formal, iconographic, and contextual methodology to produce research papers which consider critically social, economic, political, and/or religious structures that influence and formulate visual art traditions. Objects selected for study will be determined by the instructor. Pre-requisite: ARH 102 or 125 or 150Satisfies University Studies requirement 1C.

Art & Design - AXD 307-02H (12451)
History and Context of Graphic Design

TuTh 12:30 - 1:45 PM
Location: TBA
Prof. Franz

3 credits. Open to all University Students. Chronological survey of Graphic Design from pre-writing to present. This course examines graphic design within the context of technological, political, social, and economic developments, and occasionally its relationship to other visual arts. Emphasis is on the story of Graphic Design, how it changed over time, and some of the forces that played a part in that change.

Biology - BIO 121-03H (12257)
Introductory Biology I

MWF 1:00-1:50 PM
Location: TBA
Prof. Winslow

3 Credits. A broad survey of the field of biology; first of two semester sequence. This course introduces fundamental principles in molecular biology, cellular biology, heredity & genetics, and evolutionary theory. Emphasis is placed on the process of scientific discovery, evidence, and logic that support these principles. Pre-requisite for 200, 300, & 400 level biology courses. Pre-requisite: BIO or Engineering majors only. Fulfills University Studies 2A.

Biology - BIO 321-02H (10262) & -02HL (10263)
General Microbiology

Lecture: TuTh 12:30-1:45 PM / Lab: Th 2:00-4:50 PM
Location: TBA
Prof. Silby

3 Credits. The nature and diversity of microorganisms. Special emphasis is placed on bacterial cytology, nutrition, physiology, and growth. Topics on the significance of microorganisms in the environment and the evolutionary relationships of microorganisms are included. Pre-requisite: BIO 210, 214, or 215 and BIO 234 or 235. Honors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

Bioengineering - BNG 219-02H (9781)
Chemical Methods in Bioengineering

TuTh 9:30-10:45 PM
Location: TBA
Prof. Fan

3 Credits. Chemical principles and key concepts for bioengineers including chemical nomenclature, chemical syntheses, nucleic acid and protein chemistry, enzymology, metabolism, and others. Students will utilize the methods and concepts taught in this course for problem solving in biotechnology, biomanufacturing and the biopharmaceutical fields. This course also discusses manufacturing, validating, and using drugs, plastics, gels, polymers and fuels for biotechnology industry. Pre-requisite: CHM 152Honors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

Bioengineering - BNG 311-02H (10237)
Statistics for Bioengineering

MWF 1:00-1:50 PM
Location: TBA
Prof. Kim

3 Credits. A study of the basic and advanced concepts in the systematic design of experiments and the statistical methods for analyzing them. Bioengineering experiments such as single factor, factorial, fractional factorial, and Taguchi designs are explored. Statistical procedures are utilized to study data from clinical trials, bioengineering research and biomedical device design and manufacturing processes. Honors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

Bioengineering - EGR 497-02H (10236)
Bioengineering Capstone Design I

TuTh 2:00PM-3:15 PM
Location: TBA
Prof. Fan

3 Credits. Professional and management activities of project engineering as a two course sequence. Students working in teams will integrate their learning by selecting a senior Bioengineering design project, leading to a written and oral presentation of a project proposal. Intellectual property rights, ethics and economic issues, as well as applicable regulations will be considered. Pre-requisite: BNG 311 and ENL 266. Satisfies University Studies requirement 5B.

Computer Science - CIS 381-02H (10205)
Social & Ethical Aspects of Computing

MWF 2:00-2:50 PM
Location: TBA
Prof. Khatib

3 Credits. Introduction to the social, legal, and ethical issues of computing. Topics include how computer use affects social and work relationships and the uses of computers in society. These will be reviewed in the context of risks, privacy and intrusion, computer crime, intellectual property, and professional decision-making. Students analyze scenarios that allow them to view ethical decision-making as a crucial part of understanding the world of computing. Pre-requisite: Sophomore standingSatisfies University Studies requirement 2B. Honors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

Data Science - DSC 498-02H (10235)
Data Science Capstone Project I

W 3:00-5:00 PM
Location: TBA
Prof. Yan

3 Credits. Application of knowledge discovery and data mining tools and techniques to large data repositories or data streams. This project-based capstone course provides students with a framework in which students gain both understanding and insight into the application of knowledge discovery tools and principles on data within the student's cognate area. This course is intended for data science majors only.

Electrical & Computer Engineering - ECE 201-02H/HL (10239/10240)
Circuit Theory I

TuTh 12:30-1:45 PM (Lecture) / Tu 2-3:30 PM (Lab)
Location: TBA
Prof. Kasilingam

3 Credits. The first course covering basic theory of circuit analysis. The goals of this course include developing an ability to solve engineering problems and to design, implement and test circuits to meet design specifications. Topics include network theorems, review of techniques to solve simultaneous equations, nodal and mesh circuit analysis, dependent sources, Thevenin's and Norton's equivalent circuits, solution of first and second order networks to switched DC inputs, and natural responses. Group classroom and project activities require design, simulation, implementation and measurement of practical circuits. Written reports of project results are required. Pre-requisite: MTH 152 or 154; for CPE/ECE majors only. Honors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

Electrical & Computer Engineering - ECE 311-02H/HL (11760/11761)
Digital Electronics

MWF 8:00-8:50 AM (Lecture) / W 2-4:50 PM (Lab)
Location: TBA
Prof. Rancour

3 Credits. Fundamentals of solid-state electronic devices and the application of these devices to the design of digital circuits. Among the topics covered are MOS and bipolar junction transistors, logic gates and CMOS logic design. Focus is on the design of logic circuits through solving design-oriented problems and the design, implementation, and testing of logic circuits by means of computer simulation software. The course has an integrated laboratory and, in addition, contains a component designed to increase awareness of the dynamic nature of the field. Pre-requisite: ECE 201, ECE 260, and PHY 112 or 114; for CPE/ECE majors only.

Economics - ECO 231-04H (9155)
Principles of Microeconomics

MWF 10:00-10:50 AM
Location: TBA
Prof. Lynch

3 Credits. Survey of the American economy focusing on markets, the price system, and resource allocation. Price determination in competitive and imperfectly-competitive markets. Applications in agricultural economics, legal prices, excise taxes, labor market issues, advertising, technological change, pollution and the environment, public goods, antitrust policy, international trade, and alternative economic systems. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4A or 4B.

Engineering - EGR 111-05H (9581)
Introduction to Engineering and Computing

MWF 2:00-2:50 PM
Location: TBA
Prof. Hanzly

3 Credits. Introduction to engineering and computing with emphasis on development of problem solving skills through projects. The course is designed to increase the success of first year students.  It includes an overview of majors in the college, and the importance of engaged learning. Team work, written and oral communication skills are covered. Ethical issues in engineering and computing are discussed. Pre-requisite: EGR Freshmen onlyFulfills University Studies Requirement 1E.

English - ENL 101-08H (10048)
Critical Writing and Reading II: Everything's Not Awesome

MWF 9:00-9:50 AM
Location: TBA
Prof. Botvin

3 Credits. Just a short time ago, the promise of the internet was a democratization of information and access to the entire world at your fingertips. But, in the wake of massive digital platforms, corporate mergers, and deregulation of the industry, the internet has shrunken into tiny, algorithmically generated pockets, leading to floods of disinformation. This class seeks to highlight these flaws and enable learners to see the modern media landscape in a new light, developing skills of digital literacy, argument analysis, and strong research practices along the way. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1A.

English - ENL 101-31H (10070)
Critical Writing and Reading II: The TV Experience

TuTh 12:30-1:45 PM
Location: TBA
Prof. Howe

3 Credits. Why do we spend so much time watching (and talking about) television shows? What makes TV such a popular entertainment medium? What makes good TV? Is TV an art form? How has technology and the internet changed what it means to be a viewer? This section of ENL101 will focus on the theme of television and the viewing experience. Through reading articles that address these questions and more, we will develop our reading and thinking skills and practice important forms of web literacy, all while exploring our own opinions about television, viewership, and the role of TV in our world. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1A.

English - ENL 101-33H (10072)
Critical Writing and Reading II: Pop Culture and Us

TuTh 2:00 AM-3:15 PM
Location: TBA
Prof. Zhang

3 Credits. Did your family cut cord and start streaming live TV? What was the last movie you watched? What was the last pop song you played? What changes has the streaming technology brought about to pop culture? What does pop culture mean to us? This section of ENL101 will focus on the theme of “Pop Culture and Us.” By reading articles that center around the creation, distribution and consumption of pop culture, we will develop our critical reading and thinking skills of securitizing web information, recognizing a writer’s purpose, analyzing their argument, and defining intangible conversation writers have about pop culture. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1A.

English - ENL 200-07H (12459)

Topics in Literature: Going Viral

TuTh 2:00 - 3:15 PM
Location: TBA
Prof. O'Dell

3 Credits. A study of selected readings dealing with a special topic chosen by the instructor. Recent special topics include New England Literature, Children's Literature, the Artist in Literature, Black Music, and Black Literature. May be repeated with change of content. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 3A.

English - ENL 200-10H (12460)
Topics in Literature: Literature and Emotion

MWF 1:00 - 1:50 PM
Location: TBA
Prof. Bowman

3 Credits. A study of selected readings dealing with a special topic chosen by the instructor. Recent special topics include New England Literature, Children's Literature, the Artist in Literature, Black Music, and Black Literature. May be repeated with change of content. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 3A.

Finance - FIN 312-05H (9663)
Business Finance

TuTh 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: TBD
Prof. Xu

3 Credits. An introduction to the nature of financial management. The course presents the basic tools used in the decision-making process as they pertain to the acquisition, management and financing of current and long-term assets. Working capital policies, the time value of money, capital budgeting and debt and equity financing are discussed. Pre-requisites: ACT212 and ECO231, at least Junior standing; Business Majors, Business Administration Minor, or Finance Minor. Honors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

Honors – HON 101
Reasoning and Commincation across the Disciplines

Section 01 (11703): M 1:00-3:30 PM, Honors Classroom (Library 225)
Section 02 (11704): M 4:00-6:30 PM
Section 03 (11709): W 1:00-3:30 PM, Honors Classroom (Library 225)
Section 04 (11710): W 4:00-6:30 PM
Section 05 (11711): F 1:00-3:30 PM, Honors Classroom (Library 225)
Section 06 (11712): F 4:00-6:30 PM, Honors Classroom (Library 225)
Section 07 (11713): Th 12:30-3:00 PM
Section 08 (11714): Tu 12:30-3:00 PM
Section 09 (11715): Th 3:30-6:00 PM, Honors Classroom (Library 225)

3 CreditsFake news - Horoscopes - Sasquatch - Lizard people - JFK assassination - Vaccines - Flat Earth - Obama’s birthplace - Lizard people - GMOs - Organic food - COVID - Area 51 - Homeopathy - Cell tower cancer - Man-made epidemics - Election tampering - Crystal healing power - ESP – WMDs in Iraq – The moon landing – Election counts - Atlantis 

How do we know what to believe? Every day we are faced with information that we take in, evaluate, and communicate. Ideally, we can do this in a logical manner. But do we always make the right choices? Of course not! However, that doesn’t mean that we can’t learn to try to make better, more informed, and logical decisions. In this class, we will learn several ways to do this, including: (1) distinguishing good arguments from bad ones, (2) evaluating the value of claims, (3) interpreting the likelihood of outcomes, and (4) recognizing our own biases and blind spots. In addition, we will learn how to best present your arguments in a respectful and convincing way in a variety of contexts.. Pre-requisite: First semester Honors freshmen onlyFulfills University Studies Requirement 1E & 4A.

Honors – HON 201-01 (11706): Knowing Ourselves
Philosophy of Happiness

TuTh 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: Honors Classroom (Library 225)
Prof. Mulnix

3 Credits. Exploration of what it means to be human. This course will sample insights into ourselves from the unraveling of the human genome to the uncovering of the earliest evidence of distinctively human culture. Topics could include human consciousness, biomedical discoveries, defining human experiences, or the origins of human societies or belief sets. May be repeated with change of content. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4A. Humanities course for CAS Distribution.

Honors – HON 201-02 (11707): Knowing Ourselves
Searching for Meaning: Art, Music, and Philosophy Across History

TuTh 9:30-10:45 AM
Location: TBA
Prof. Sherwin

3 Credits. Exploration of what it means to be human. This course will sample insights into ourselves from the unraveling of the human genome to the uncovering of the earliest evidence of distinctively human culture. Topics could include human consciousness, biomedical discoveries, defining human experiences, or the origins of human societies or belief sets. May be repeated with change of content. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4A. Humanities course for CAS Distribution.

Honors – HON 202-01 (11708): Transformative American Ideas
American Democracy in Crisis

TuTh 12:30-1:45 PM
Location: TBA
Prof. Santow

3 Credits. Investigation of important North American contributions to human civilization, from Jazz and the airplane, to nuclear weapons and Cheese Wiz, to individual rights, the written constitution and the democratic republic. Topics could include Coming Down with the Blues; building the car, or the plane, Hollywood and the Invention of mass cinema; from inalienable rights to human rights; the Long 1960s as Cultural Revolution. May be repeated with change of content. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4B. Humanities Course for CAS Distribution.

Honors – HON 301-01 (8923)
Honors Research Across the Disciplines

Tuesday 3:30PM-5:10PM
Location: 
Prof. Sethares

3 Credits. Preparation for Honors thesis or project. Students should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE they plan to begin work on their project. The course explores topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, students will identify their project supervisor and submit their initial project proposal. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4B or 4C.

Honors – HON 301-02 (8924)
Honors Research Across the Disciplines

Monday 3:30PM-5:10PM
Location: Honors Classroom (Library 225)
Prof. Alves

3 Credits. Preparation for Honors thesis or project. Students should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE they plan to begin work on their project. The course explores topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, students will identify their project supervisor and submit their initial project proposal. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4B or 4C.

Honors – HON 301-03 (8925)
Honors Research Across the Disciplines

Wednesday 3:30PM-5:10PM
Location: Honors Classroom (Library 225)
Prof. Ayotte

3 Credits. Preparation for Honors thesis or project. Students should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE they plan to begin work on their project. The course explores topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, students will identify their project supervisor and submit their initial project proposal. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4B or 4C.

Honors – HON 490-01 (8926)
Honors Thesis Project I

Independent Study
Prof. Shapiro

3 Credits. Research for and preparation of an honors thesis in partial fulfillment of the University Honors Program requirements for graduation as a Commonwealth Scholar, for students whose honors research is multi-disciplinary. In the first semester, the student engages in intensive reading and research appropriate to the thesis or project, culminating in a formal written proposal. During the second semester, the student completes the writing and other preparation of the thesis or project. Students must present their results in an appropriate public forum. Students typically register to continue to complete HON 491, and an intermediate grade of IP can be given in HON 490 until there is a final grade for HON 491 which can then also be applied to HON 490. On the other hand, a final grade can be given at the conclusion of HON 490. Enrollment requires a permission number from the instructor.

Honors – HON 491-01 (8927)
Honors Thesis Project II

Independent Study
Prof. Shapiro

3 Credits. Continuation of HON 490 thesis work. Enrollment requires a permission number from the instructor.

Management - MGT 312-05H (11792)
Legal Framework of Business

MWF 1:00-1:50 PM
Location: 
Prof. Levinson

3 Credits. Overview of the legal environment of business. Topics covered include contracts, agency and tort law; labor law; securities law. Students will develop a general background in the major aspects of the law as it affects the daily business environment. Pre-requisites: Sophomore standing; Business Majors, Business Administration Minor, Sustainability Minor, or Material & Textiles MajorsHonors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

Charlton College of Business - MIS 101-06H (9682)
The Business Organization

MW 9:00-9:50 AM
Location: CCB 115
Prof. TBA

3 Credits. A technology-based, cross-discipline course for first-year students, the first business core course. It introduces first-year business majors to the world of business and enriches their first year experience. It provides students with an overview of business, its environment and its subsystems (e.g. operations, marketing, accounting, finance and information systems); and enhances their computer and team-working skills. Through informational and advising experiences students make decisions in areas such as the selection of courses, a major, a career and the utilization of on-campus student resources. Pre-requisitesFreshmen Business Majors onlyFulfills University Studies Requirement 1E.

Mathematics - MTH 153-05H (9423)
Calculus for Applied Science and Engineering I

MW 1-1:50 and F 12:00-1:50 PM
Location: SENG 207
Prof. Luo

4 Credits. An intensive study of differential calculus and its applications, and an introduction to integrals. Topics include: limits, continuity, indeterminate forms, differentiation and integration of algebraic and transcendental functions, implicit and logarithmic differentiation, integration by substitution, the applications of calculus in science and engineering, and the use of technological tools (such as graphing calculator and computer algebra systems). This is the first semester of the standard calculus sequence designed for Physics and Engineering majors in the integrated engineering curriculum. With your advisor's consent, this course may be repeated as MTH 151. This course fulfills the general education core requirements for Physics and Engineering majors who matriculated prior to Fall 2012 and has been  approved by University Studies Curriculum for students matriculating in Fall 2012 or later. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1D.

Mathematics - MTH 213-04H (12484)
Calculus for Applied Science and Engineering III

TuTh 10-11:50 AM
Location: SENG 207
Prof. Marzullo

4 Credits. An introduction to multivariable and vector calculus.  This is the third and the final semester of the Calculus sequence. Topics cover 3-D analytical geometry, partial derivatives, directional derivatives, gradient, applications, multiple integrals, parameterized curves and surfaces, vector fields, line integrals and Green theorem, flux, and divergence, Stokes and the divergence theorems. MTH 213 can be replaced by MTH 211. Pre-requisite: MTH 152 or MTH 154.

Mechanical Engineering - MNE 380-01H (10016)
Honors Enrichment

W 3:00-3:50 PM
Location: TBD
Prof. Huang

1 Credit. Honors enrichment course supplementing a required junior level course in the Mechanical Engineering curriculum. This course is open to honors students who are enrolled in the affiliated required course in the mechanical engineering curriculum. The course provides coverage of more advanced topics and more in-depth analysis of concepts than are covered in the basic class. The course may include lecture and laboratory components at the instructor's discretion.

Music - MUS 101-02H (10313)
Introduction to Music

TuTh 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: CVPA 107
Prof. Sherwin

3 Credits. Presents a basic music vocabulary and develops intelligent discrimination in the listener through study and analysis of outstanding works from Gregorian Chant to the present, including music of diverse cultures. Emphasis is also placed on the relationship of the historical development of music to parallel movements in art, drama, philosophical thought, etcFulfills University Studies Requirement 3B. Humanities course for the CAS Distribution.

Music - MUS 103-01H (8934)
Introduction to World Music

MWF 9:00-9:50 AM
Location: CVPA 107
Prof. Eckert

3 Credits. Explores the musical traditions of various cultures with respect to their historical, social, and cultural backgrounds. This course also explores different approaches to musical organization, musical practice, and significant aspects of style within a world music settingFulfills University Studies Requirement 3B. Humanities course for the CAS Distribution.

Nursing – NUR 212-04H (10238)
Concepts of Pathophysiology and Pharmacology in Nursing

MW 8:30-10:30AM
Location: TBA
Prof. Sosa

3 Credits. Introduction to concepts related to common physiologic alterations and influences of genetics and genomics on disease development.  Building upon science and math courses while integrating and threading concepts introduced in introductory nursing courses, this course illustrates resulting human adaptation processes to expand student critical thinking and judgment for patient care.  Pharmacologic concepts and applications to associated alterations are integrated as applicable to physiologic processes throughout the course. Pre-requisite: BIO 221/223, BIO 222/224, & CHM 105.

Physics – PHY 109-02H (9957)
Freshman Seminar I

MWF 3:00-3:50 PM
Location: TBA
Prof. Rajapakse

3 Credits. Seminar on fundamental topics and new discoveries in physics. Also an introduction to the physics major program and faculty research. Pre-requisite: Freshmen only. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1E.

Physics – PHY 113-02H/HL (9967 / 9969)
Classical Physics I

Lecture: MWF 1:00PM-1:50PM / Lab: M 10:00PM-11:50 AM
Location: TBA
Prof. TBA

4 Credits. Calculus-based introduction to classical mechanics, emphasizing problem solving. Topics include 1- and 2-dimensional kinematics and dynamics; Newton's Laws of Motion; work, energy and momentum; and rotational motion and angular momentum. Many of these topics are further explored in laboratory experiments. Pre-requisite: MTH 151 or MTH 153, or permission of instructor. Honors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

Operations Management – POM 212-05H (9701)
Applied Modern Physics

MWF 9:00-9:50 AM
Location: TBA
Prof. TBA

3 Credits. Examines both descriptive and inferential statistics as applied to business. Topics include graphical and tabular methods of data presentation, probability theory and distributions, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, regression and forecasting. Emphasis is placed on concepts, applications, and the proper use of statistics to collect, analyze, and interpret data. Throughout this course students will use computer software to perform statistical analyses. Students will learn how to make decisions using facts and the techniques of data analysis. Students will also use the internet to supplement classroom learning. Pre-requisiteMTH 146.

Political Science – PSC 284-02H (9199)
Model U.N.

MWF 1:00-1:50 PM
Location: TBA
Prof. Sandby-Thomas

3 Credits. Examination of the role played by the United Nations in dealing with important issues and challenges in the arena of international politics. Students perform the role of delegates representing individual countries and, through the format of simulations, learn about the statecraft of foreign policy, diplomacy and international relations. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4C. Honors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

Psychology – PSY 101-06H (10329)
General Psychology

TuTh 2:00-3:15 PM
Location: Honors Classroom (LIB 225)
Prof. Ayotte

3 Credits. A broad survey of principles underlying the systematic study of behavior. Using examples from basic research and applied settings, a variety of perspectives are explored, including findings associated with the physiological, behavioral, cognitive, developmental and social approaches. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4A.

Psychology – PSY 205-01H (9322)
Statistics for Psychology

MW 8:00-9:40 AM
Location: LARTS 213
Prof. Kayal

4 Credits. An introduction to analysis of quantitative data in psychology, including probability, descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, analysis of variance and data analysis by computer. Pre-requisite: PSY 101 and Psychology majors only.

University Studies

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