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Please be aware that Spring registration for honors students will be opening at 7:30am on the following dates:

  • Monday, November 1, 2021 for students with 100 credits or more;
  • Tuesday, November 2, 2021 for students with 85 to 99.9 earned credits;
  • Wednesday, November 3, 2021, early registration groups including honors students.

Please register as early as you can to take advantage of the widest range of choice.

Honors Courses ● Spring 2022

Art History - ARH 208-01H (12759)
Art, Disaster and Memory

MW 12:00-1:15 PM
Location: Honors Classroom
Prof. Stubblefield

3 credits. A study of the visual imagery of disaster. This class will consider the role photography, film, painting and sculpture have played in the experience of modern disasters such as the French Commune, the Civil War, WWI, the Holocaust, Hiroshima and 9/11. Satisfies University Studies requirement 3B: Visual & Performing ArtsCAS Humanities course.

Bioengineering - BNG 255-02H (12814)
Biology for Engineers

MWF 1:00-1:50 PM
Location: TBA
Prof. Hanzly

3 Credits. Principles of biology at the biology/engineering interface. The course will discuss biological principles that can inform an approach to engineering that is more in harmony with living systems and it will present engineering analyses of the structure and function of human tissue. Topics include an introduction to molecular biology, evolution and design, cell structure and function, the mechanics of tissues, sensing and signal transmission in the nervous system,  biological energy generation and transduction, chemical detoxification and waste handling, and tissue defense mechanisms. Honors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience. Satisfies University Studies requirement 2B: Engaged Community

Bioengineering - BNG 315-02H (12816)
Biomechanics

TuTh 12:30-1:45 PM
Location: TBA
Prof. Lamya Karim

3 Credits. Introduction to the mechanical behavior of biological tissues and systems. Specific topics include: structure and function of biological tissues, mechanical properties of natural and prosthetic materials, and analysis of both rigid body and deformational mechanics applied to biological tissues including bone and soft connective tissues. Basic concepts of deformable body mechanics, including stress and strain analysis, viscoelasticity, muscle action and applications to common problems in orthopedic biomechanics. Pre-requisite: EGR 241. Co-requisite: MTH 212 and BNG 317. Honors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

Bioengineering - BNG 316-02H (13281)
Biomaterials

TuTh 9:30-10:45 AM
Location: TBA
Prof. TBA

3 Credits.An introduction to biological and biomedical materials. The course examines the structure and properties of metallic, ceramic, polymeric, and biological materials and their interaction with biological systems. Consideration is given to biocompatibility and biodegradation of natural and synthetic biomedical materials and their use for hard and soft tissue replacement, organ replacement, coating and adhesives, dental implants, and drug delivery systems. Recent trends in biomaterials design, synthesis, commercialization and performance are also discussed. Honors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

Bioengineering - EGR 498-02H (12805)
Bioengineering Capstone Design II

TuTh 2:00PM-3:15 PM
Location: TBA
Prof. Fan

3 Credits. Application of knowledge gained in various courses to the synthesis, analysis, and design of a system in a particular bioengineering field of interest selected by the student's team. The product proposed in EGR 497 will be built in EGR 498. Pre-requisite: EGR 497. Satisfies University Studies requirement 5A.

Chemistry - CHM 156-02H (12112)
Modern Chemical Principles II

MWF 10:00-10:50 AM
Location: TBA
Prof. Silvia

3 Credits. A continuation of CHM 155. The details of the behavior of solids, liquids, & gases, the types of intermolecular forces, colligative properties, gaseous equilibrium, aqueous equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, kinetics, and nuclear chemistry are emphasized and discussed in light of modern scientific theories. For science and engineering majors. Pre-requisite: CHM majors only. Honors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

Electrical & Computer Engineering - ECE 202-02H/HL (13085/13086)
Circuit Theory II

TuTh 9:30-10:45 AM (Lecture) / Th 2-3:30 PM (Lab)
Location: TBA
Prof. Mohammad Karim

3 Credits. The second course in basic circuit theory and design. Topics include AC circuit steady-state response analysis, review of complex numbers, phasors, coupled inductors and ideal transformers, rms voltage and current, the maximum power transfer theorem, balanced 3-phase systems, and power and energy computations, applications of Laplace transforms to solutions of switched circuits and differential equations with initial conditions, stability, poles/zeros, Fourier transform, frequency response, Bode plots, network analysis, and equivalent circuits. Students are introduced to graphical convolution and Fourier series. Group classroom and project activities require design, implementation and measurement of filters and other circuits to meet design specifications. Pre-requisite: ECE 201, for CPE/ECE majors only. Honors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

English - ENL 102-04H (10640)
Critical Writing and Reading II: Can I Have Your Attention?

MWF 2:00-2:50 PM
Location: TBA
Prof. Julie Bowman

3 Credits. Let's focus for a minute on attention. What has your attention? Where do you spend this precious resource? What are you getting in return for your 'spending'? In this course, we will examine the "attention economy" that has emerged in the information-age. How is the clamor for our attention affecting us individually? As a society? What do we gain or lose by paying attention to one thing versus another? Do we need to pay attention to what we're paying attention to? In this course, we'll give our attention to arguments about attention (and its economy) to understand what others have said about it, concluding the course by turning our attention to what we have to say about it. Pre-requisite: ENL 101. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1B.

English - ENL 102-50H (12902)
Critical Writing and Reading II: Writing About Writing

MWF 12:00-12:50 PM
Location: TBA
Prof. Olsen

3 Credits. This section will focus on writing studies as a unique discipline. That is, we will study writing in the same way we would study biology or history. Writing assignments will challenge you to incorporate multiple voices from class readings with your own, helping you to create a strong critical stance and academic voice. You will develop authority as you communicate your own ideas and experiences to a specific audience. We will emphasize the writing process, so you will plan, draft, and revise. By the end of the course, you will be better prepared to take strong writing and thinking skills to whatever field of expertise you pursue as a university student. Pre-requisite: ENL 101. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1B.

English - ENL 102-51H (12903)
Critical Writing and Reading II: Exploring Food

TuTh 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
Location: Honors Classroom
Prof. Zhang

3 Credits. Vegan, localvore, organivore and omnivore, which word characterizes your diet? When you go grocery shopping, what food do you regularly put in your cart? Do you eat actual meals or substitute them with nutrition pills or drink? Would you continue your ethnic way of cooking or eating food if you move to a different country? In this class, students are going to read different articles about food and through class discussion as well as different assignments they will ultimately form their own arguments about food. Pre-requisite: ENL 101. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1B.

English - ENL 200-12H (10688)
Studies in Literature

TuTh 9:30 AM-10:45 AM
Location: TBA
Prof. Harrison

3 Credits. A study of selected readings dealing with a special topic chosen by the instructor. Recent special topics include New England Literature, Children's Literature, the Artist in Literature, Black Music, and Black Literature. May be repeated with change of content. Pre-requisite: ENL 102. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 3A: Literature.

English - ENL 266-06H (10713)
Technical Communication

MWF 9:00 AM-9:50 AM
Location: TBA
Prof. Botvin

3 Credits. Introduction to the technical communication skills used in business and industry. Students practice techniques for creating, managing, and presenting information in written, oral, visual, and electronic forms and use a variety of tools to research and collaborate on projects that relate to many audiences, purposes, forms, and formats of  technical communication. Pre-requisite: ENL 102. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1C: Intermediate Writing.

Finance - FIN 312-04H (10870)
Business Finance

MWF 10:00-10:50 AM
Location: TBD
Prof. Sun

3 Credits. An introduction to the nature of financial management. The course presents the basic tools used in the decision-making process as they pertain to the acquisition, management and financing of current and long-term assets. Working capital policies, the time value of money, capital budgeting and debt and equity financing are discussed. Pre-requisites: ACT212 and ECO231, at least Junior standing; Business Majors, Business Administration Minor, or Finance Minor. Honors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

Honors – HON 201-01 (11705)
Knowing Ourselves: Philosophy and Popular Culture

MW 2:00-3:15 PM
Location: Honors Classroom (Library 225)
Prof. Mulnix

3 Credits. Philosophy permeates popular culture through various shows such as The Good PlaceRick and Morty, and Black Mirror. In this course, we will discuss certain philosophical questions raised by these shows on topics such as artificial intelligence, virtual reality, surveillance and privacy, personal identity, crime and punishment, and morality. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4A. Humanities course for CAS Distribution.

Honors – HON 201-02 (11707)
Knowing Ourselves: Friends with Benefits - Interpersonal Relationships & Health

MWF 10:00-10:50 AM
Location: Honors Classroom (Library 225)
Prof. Ayotte

3 Credits. Do you like to exercise with a friend? Do you like competing against other people? Have you noticed that families share health characteristics? Do you have people in your life that encourage you to be healthy (or unhealthy)? This course will examine how interpersonal relationships influence health behaviors and health outcomes. We will talk about topics such as social support, competition, shared environments, health-related social control, social networks, and other interesting and fun topics. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4A. Social Science course for CAS Distribution.

Honors – HON 201-03 (11706)
Knowing Ourselves: The Science of Positive Psychology

TuTh 9:30-10:45 AM
Location: Honors Classroom (Library 225)
Prof. Hojjat

3 Credits. Survey of major topics and theories in positive psychology. A major goal of this course is to stimulate students to explore the scientific and practical implications of positive psychology. Students will be required to read, critique, and propose original research studies. Topics include positive emotions, prosocial behavior, love, and flourishing relationships. An oral presentation is required. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4A. Social Science course for CAS Distribution.

Honors – HON 202-01 (11709)
Transformative American Ideas: Predators - How US Drones and the CIA Changed War

TuTh 3:30-4:45 PM
Location: Honors Classroom (Library 225)
Prof. Williams

3 Credits. Taught by a professor who worked for the CIA in Afghanistan, this course takes students on a thought-provoking journey into the dark world of CIA Reaper and Predator drone warfare on Al Qaeda, ISIS and Taliban terrorists in the warzones of the Islamic world. Students will watch Hollywood movies, read a drone novel and history of drone assassinations, and watch actual HVT (High Value Target) drone strike videos to analyze whether the accidental death of civilians at the hands of the relentless 'robotic' hi-tech killers is worth the prize of preventing mass casualty terror attacks on Americans. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4B. Humanities Course for CAS Distribution.

Honors – HON 203-01 (11710)
Creating Global Community: Language and Society

TuTh 12:30-1:45 PM
Location: Honors Classroom (Library 225)
Prof. Silva

3 Credits. This course will provide an introduction to the study of language in social contexts, exploring the interaction between language and social factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic class. The course will include discussions about the use of language to establish identities, the use of two or more languages (bi/multilingualism), language attitudes, language contact, and language and power. Learners will gain insight into some of the language choices made routinely and how those choices help shape their selves and, at the same time, impact the world around them. Learners will also be introduced to research methodology and will have the opportunity to conduct some basic sociolinguistic research. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4C. Social Science course for CAS Distribution.

Honors – HON 203-02 (11711)
Creating Global Community: Impact of Internet on Society

MWF 11:00-11:50 AM
Location: Honors Classroom (Library 225)
Prof. Hanzly

3 Credits. Exploration of globalization through its causes and in terms of the economic, cultural and political consequences that have followed. The course approaches this theme from both descriptive and normative perspectives. Topics could include the food revolution and changing global demographics, the internet and its impact on human interaction, climate crisis and global solidarity. May be repeated with change of content. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4C. Social Science course for CAS Distribution.

Honors – HON 301-01 (11712)
Honors Research Across the Disciplines

Tuesday 3:30PM-5:10PM
Location: Honors Classroom (Library 225)
Prof. Gardner

3 Credits. Preparation for Honors thesis or project. Students should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE they plan to begin work on their project. The course explores topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, students will identify their project supervisor and submit their initial project proposal. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4B or 4C.

Honors – HON 301-02 (11713)
Honors Research Across the Disciplines (Blended Course)

Monday 3:30PM-5:10PM
Location: Honors Classroom (Library 225)
Prof. Alves

3 Credits. Preparation for Honors thesis or project. Students should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE they plan to begin work on their project. The course explores topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, students will identify their project supervisor and submit their initial project proposal. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4B or 4C.

Honors – HON 490-01 (11714)
Honors Thesis Project I

Independent Study
Prof. Shapiro

3 Credits. Research for and preparation of an honors thesis in partial fulfillment of the University Honors Program requirements for graduation as a Commonwealth Scholar, for students whose honors research is multi-disciplinary. In the first semester, the student engages in intensive reading and research appropriate to the thesis or project, culminating in a formal written proposal. During the second semester, the student completes the writing and other preparation of the thesis or project. Students must present their results in an appropriate public forum. Students typically register to continue to complete HON 491, and an intermediate grade of IP can be given in HON 490 until there is a final grade for HON 491 which can then also be applied to HON 490. On the other hand, a final grade can be given at the conclusion of HON 490. Enrollment requires a permission number from the instructor.

Honors – HON 491-01 (11715)
Honors Thesis Project II

Independent Study
Prof. Shapiro

3 Credits. Continuation of HON 490 thesis work. Enrollment requires a permission number from the instructor.

Management - MGT 312-04H (10909)
Legal Framework of Business

MWF 1:00-1:50 PM
Location: 
Prof. Levinson

3 Credits. Overview of the legal environment of business. Topics covered include contracts, agency and tort law; labor law; securities law. Students will develop a general background in the major aspects of the law as it affects the daily business environment. Pre-requisites: Sophomore standing; Business Majors, Business Administration Minor, Sustainability Minor, or Material & Textiles Majors. Honors students have a more immersive and individualized learning experience.

Mechanical Engineering - MNE 280-01H (13309)
Honors Enrichment

Tu 11:00-11:50 AM
Location: TBD
Prof. Ling

1 Credit. Honors enrichment course supplementing a required sophomore level course in the Mechanical Engineering curriculum. This course is open to honors students who are enrolled in the affiliated required course in the mechanical engineering curriculum. The course provides coverage of more advanced topics and more in-depth analysis of concepts than are covered in the basic class. The course may include lecture and laboratory components at the instructor's discretion.

Mechanical Engineering - MNE 380-01H (13311)
Honors Enrichment

Tu 2:00-2:50 PM
Location: TBD
Prof. Bhowmick

1 Credit. Honors enrichment course supplementing a required junior level course in the Mechanical Engineering curriculum. This course is open to honors students who are enrolled in the affiliated required course in the mechanical engineering curriculum. The course provides coverage of more advanced topics and more in-depth analysis of concepts than are covered in the basic class. The course may include lecture and laboratory components at the instructor's discretion.

Nursing – NUR 102-05H (11521)
Concepts of the Professional Nursing Role I

Th 8-10:50AM
Location: TBA
Prof. Desroches

3 Credits. Introduction to the discipline of professional nursing. Learners will examine individual values and beliefs in relation to foundational concepts, including the nursing process, and behaviors that define the discipline. The purpose of course is to build a foundation of self as nurse. The emphasis is placed on socializing the learner as an active, developing professional within the legal and ethical context and dimensions of the discipline. Learners will explore the relationship to self, individuals, families and communities utilizing the art of nursing presence and therapeutic communication. The AACN Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice were used to build this course. Pre-requisite: NUR 101.

Nursing – NUR 261-02H (11526)
Concepts of Scholarship for Nursing Practice

W 2-4:50 PM
Location: Dion 114
Prof. Sethares

3 Credits. Introduction to the concepts of evidence-based nursing practice, informatics, and technology. Connections between these concepts, related theory, the research process, and application to evidence-based practice and health care quality are explored. Building on the concepts of communication, culture and diversity, legal and ethical issues, and professional behaviors, this course fosters growth in student writing skills by integrating writing assignments with critical thinking skills. This course is based on the American Nurses Association (2015) Scope and Standards of Practice. The AACN Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice were used to build this course.

Physics – PHY 114-02H/HL/HR (13223 / 13224 / 13225)
Classical Physics II

Lecture: MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM / Recitation: W 1:00PM-1:50PM / Lab: W 2:00PM-3:50PM
Lecture & Recitation: TBA
Prof. Rajapakse

4 Credits. Calculus-based introduction to classical mechanics, emphasizing problem solving. Topics include 1- and 2-dimensional kinematics and dynamics; Newton's Laws of Motion; work, energy and momentum; and rotational motion and angular momentum. Many of these topics are further explored in laboratory experiments. Prerequisite: MTH 151 or MTH 153, or permission of instructor.

Physics – PHY 213-02H/HR (13232 / 13233)
Applied Modern Physics

Lecture: MWF 1:00PM-1:50PM / Recitation: M 2:00PM-2:50PM
Lecture & Recitation: TBA
Prof. Fisher

3 Credits. A first course in modern physics designed for engineering and physics students. It deals with light waves, diffraction, interference, and basic matter waves with an introduction to the Schrödinger equation. Basic atomic and nuclear physics is also introduced. Pre-requisite: PHY 112 or PHY 114; MTH 152 or MTH 154; or permission of instructor.

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