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Honors Courses—Spring 2020

Please be aware that Fall registration for honors students will be opening on the following dates:

Monday, November 4, 2019 for students with 100 credits or more;

Tuesday, November 5, 2019 for students with 85 to 99.9 earned credits

Wednesday, November 6, 2019, early registration groups including honors students

Please register as early as you can to take advantage of the widest range of choice.

Spring 2020 Honors courses

Biology--BIO 132-02H (10486) ● Introductory Biology Laboratory II
Tuesday 9:30-12:15pm in TBA ● Professor Benjamin Winslow

 

1 Credit. Biology of Organisms Laboratory II is the arena in which students’ analytical skills and critical thinking continue to develop. This course is specifically conceptualized for Honors Biology majors. It is a challenging and enjoyable journey. As a consequence of exploring scientific hypotheses and working in unique experimental settings, students retain much information concerning the structure, function, and behavioral adaptations of living organisms. Most importantly, students become independent learners of biology and value both its philosophical and practical significance in today’s world. Students discover that nature is measurable and factual (=observable) and that biology provides them with naturalistic explanations about life processes and patterns. Students feel comfortable working in the laboratory and become skillful at using sophisticated equipment; they understand and apply statistical concepts, write scientific papers, design posters and multi-media-based oral presentations, participate in workshop-like experiences, and attend scientific meetings specifically organized for college audiences. Corequisite: BIO 122.  Prerequisite: BIO 121, 131. This course fulfills University Studies requirement 2A – The Natural World: Scientific Inquiry and Understanding: Science of the Natural World.

Bioengineering—BNG 255-02H (11441) ● Biology for Engineers
MWF 1-1:50pm in TBA ● Professor Tracie Ferreira

 

3 Credits. Principles of biology at the biology/engineering interface. The course will discuss biological principles that can inform an approach to engineering that is more in harmony with living systems and it will present engineering analyses of the structure and function of human tissue. Topics include an introduction to molecular biology, evolution and design, cell structure and function, the mechanics of tissues, sensing and signal transmission in the nervous system, biological energy generation and transduction, chemical detoxification and waste handling, and tissue defense mechanisms. This course fulfills University Studies requirement 2B – The Natural World: Scientific Inquiry and Understanding: Science in the Engaged Community.

Chemistry—CHM 156-02H/02R1 (10549/10550) ● Modern Chemical Principles II
MWF 10:00-10:50am in TBA, Monday 1:00-1:50pm in TBA ● Professor Melissa Silva

 

3 Credits. A continuation of CHM 155. The details of the behavior of solids, liquids, & gases, the types of intermolecular forces, colligative properties, gaseous equilibrium, aqueous equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, kinetics, and nuclear chemistry are emphasized and discussed in light of modern scientific theories. For science and engineering majors. Non-honors sections are offered. Prerequisite: CHM 155 with a grade C or better, or permission of the instructor. This course fulfills University Studies requirement 2A – The Natural World: Scientific Inquiry and Understanding: Science of the Natural World.

Crime and Justice—CJS 190-03H (12426) ● Introduction to the Crime and Justice System

TuTh 12:30-1:45pm in Honors Classroom, LIB 213 ● Professor Susan Krumholz

 

3 Credits. An introductory course that familiarizes the student with the basic history, structure, function, and problems associated with the criminal justice system. The course will examine a variety of general and specific controversies associated with the contemporary criminal justice system in order to develop a critical perspective on the nature of justice and society's response to behavior that has been labeled as criminal. Prerequisites: Honors Program Students Only This course fulfills University Studies requirement 4B – The Social World: Humanity and Society: The Nature of US Society.

 

 

General Engineering—EGR 498-02H (11438) ● Bioengineering Capstone Design II
TuTh 2-3:15pm in (TBA) ● Professor Qinguo Fan

 

2 Credits. Application of knowledge gained in various courses to the synthesis, analysis, and design of a system in a particular bioengineering field of interest selected by the student's team. The product proposed in EGR 497 will be built in EGR 498. This course in combination with EGR 497 fulfills University Studies requirements 5A – The Educated and Engaged Citizen: Integrating the UMD Experience: Capstone Study and 5B – Learning Through Engagement.

 

 

English--ENL 102-04H (10790) ● Critical Writing & Reading II
MWF 2-2:50pm TBA ● Instructor TBA

 

3 Credits. A course designed to advance the rhetorical skills and understanding developed in ENL 101. Critical reading of various literary genres and analytic and argumentative writing assignments enhance the student's awareness and use of effective language. This course fulfills University Studies requirement 1B – Foundations for Engagement: Skills for the 21st Century: Critical Reading and Writing II.

 

 

English--ENL 102-35H (10816) ● Critical Writing & Reading II

Tu & Th 11:00-12:15pm in TBA ● Instructor TBD

3 Credits. A course designed to advance the rhetorical skills and understanding developed in ENL 101. Critical reading of various literary genres and analytic and argumentative writing assignments enhance the student's awareness and use of effective language. This course fulfills University Studies requirement 1B – Foundations for Engagement: Skills for the 21st Century: Critical Reading and Writing II.

 

 

Finance-FIN 312-04H (10404) ● Business Finance
MWF 10:00-10:50pm in (TBA) ● Professor Zhenzhen Sun

 

3 Credits. An introduction to the nature of financial management. The course presents the basic tools used in the decision-making process as they pertain to the acquisition, management, and financing current and long-term assets. Working capital policies, the time value of money, capital budgeting, and debt and equity financing are discussed.

 

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Honors – HON 201-01 (12284) ● Topic: The Science of Positive Psychology

MWF 10-10:50am in Honors Classroom, LIB 213 ● Professor Mahzad Hojjat

 

3 Credits. Survey of major topics, theories, and research findings in positive psychology.   A major goal of this course is to stimulate students to explore the scientific aspects and practical implications of positive psychology. Students will read and critique original research studies. Topics include positive emotions, positive traits, prosocial behaviors, and flourishing relationships. An oral presentation is required. This course fulfills University Studies requirement 4A – The Social World: Humanity and Society: Human Questions and Contexts.

Honors – HON 201-02 (12427) ● Topic: Flight from the Reich: Austrian Jews and the Holocaust

Monday & Wednesday 2:00-3:15pm in Honors Classroom, LIB 213 ● Professor Ilana Offenberger

 

3 Credits. This course introduces students to the pre-genocidal period of the Holocaust by examining Jewish life in Vienna just after Anschluss: the Nazi takeover of Austria in March 1938.  Taking together the histories of ordinary persons and families who lived during this time, students will confront the following questions: Who were the Jews of Vienna and how did they live on the eve of Anschluss?  How did they react and respond to the Nazi takeover, and why? What options did they have?  How did their lives change immediately and permanently?  What decisions were they forced to confront, and how did their choices impact their futures? To explore these questions, the course will look at various aspects of Jewish life in Vienna from the turn of the century to the present day. Special attention will be given to the impact of major historical turning points on people’s private lives.  Students will read memoirs and view oral testimonies of individuals who lived during this time. This course fulfills University Studies requirement 4A – The Social World: Humanity and Society: Human Questions and Contexts.

 

 

Honors – HON 202-01 (12469) ● Topic: Origins of Today’s Sexism and Racism in the U.S.

Monday 4-6:30pm in Honors Classroom, LIB 213 ● Professor Elizabeth Lehr

 

3 Credits. This course examines Western and national historical roots of sexism and racism in the United States. Despite regular disclaimers from large segments of American society that sexism and racism no longer exist, the close observer views claims of full equality for all as American mythology. The roots of sexism and racism lie centuries, indeed millennia, in the human past. Understanding how notions of inferiority have been attached to diverse bodies can help us act to undo social and institutional practices that deny some sexed and racialized bodies access to the benefits of American society, while privileging others. Starting with constructions from the distant past in the Global West, this course focuses primarily on the 19th and 20th centuries in the U.S., ending with the Black Lives Matter and #MeToo movements. This course fulfills University Studies requirement 4B - The Social World: Humanity and Society: The Nature of US Society.

Honors 301-01 (12250) ● Honors Research Across the Disciplines (Blended Course)
Wednesday 4:00-5:40pm in Honors Classroom, LIB 213 ● Professor Keota Fields

 

3 Credits. This seminar will prepare you to undertake your Honors thesis or project. You should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE you plan to begin work on your project. We will explore topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, you will identify your project supervisor and submit your initial project proposal. This course fulfills University Studies requirement 4C – The Social World: Humanity and Society: The Nature of the Global Society.

 

 

Honors 301-02 (12251) ● Honors Research Across the Disciplines (Blended Course)
Tuesday 3:30-5:10pm in Honors Classroom, LIB 213 ● Professor Nicholas Santavicca

 

3 Credits. This seminar will prepare you to undertake your Honors thesis or project. You should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE you plan to begin work on your project. We will explore topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, you will identify your project supervisor and submit your initial project proposal. This course fulfills University Studies requirement 4C – The Social World: Humanity and Society: The Nature of the Global Society.

 

 

Honors – HON 490-01 (12252) ● Honors Thesis Project I
Independent Study
● Prof. Catherine Villanueva Gardner

 

3 Credits. Research for and preparation of an honors thesis in partial fulfillment of the University Honors Program requirements for graduation as a Commonwealth Scholar, for students whose honors research is multi-disciplinary. In the first semester, the student engages in intensive reading and research appropriate to the thesis or project, culminating in a formal written proposal. During the second semester, the student completes the writing and other preparation of the thesis or project. Students must present their results in an appropriate public forum. Students typically register to continue to complete HON 491, and an intermediate grade of IP can be given in HON 490 until there is a final grade for HON 491 which can then also be applied to HON 490. On the other hand, a final grade can be given at the conclusion of HON 490.  Enrollment requires a permission number from the instructor.

 

 

Honors – HON 491-01 (12253) ● Honors Thesis Project II
Independent Study
● Prof. Catherine Villanueva Gardner

 

3 Credits. Research for and preparation of an honors thesis in partial fulfillment of the University Honors Program requirements for graduation as a Commonwealth Scholar, for students whose honors research is multi-disciplinary. In the first semester, the student engages in intensive reading and research appropriate to the thesis or project, culminating in a formal written proposal. During the second semester, the student completes the writing and other preparation of the thesis or project. Students must present their results in an appropriate public forum. Students typically register to continue to complete HON 491, and an intermediate grade of IP can be given in HON 490 until there is a final grade for HON 491 which can then also be applied to HON 490. On the other hand, a final grade can be given at the conclusion of HON 490.  Enrollment requires a permission number from the instructor.

Mechanical Engineering – MNE 280-01H (11583) ● Honors Enrichment

Friday 1:00-1:50 in TBD ● Professor Vijaya Chalivendra

 

1 Credit. Honors enrichment course supplementing a required sophomore level course in the Mechanical Engineering curriculum. This course is open to honors students who are enrolled in the affiliated required course in the mechanical engineering curriculum. The course provides coverage of more advanced topics and more in-depth analysis of concepts than are covered in the basic class. The course may include lecture and laboratory components at the instructor's discretion.

Mechanical Engineering – MNE 380-01H (11655) ● Honors Enrichment

Tuesday 2-2:50 in TBD ● Professor Jun Li

 

1 Credit. Honors enrichment course supplementing a required junior level course in the Mechanical Engineering curriculum. This course is open to honors students who are enrolled in the affiliated required course in the mechanical engineering curriculum. The course provides coverage of more advanced topics and more in-depth analysis of concepts than are covered in the basic class. The course may include lecture and laboratory components at the instructor's discretion.

Mechanical Engineering – MNE 498-02H (11586) ● Mechanical Engineering Design Project II

Tu & Th 2-3:15 in TBA ● Professor Hamed Samandari

 

2 Credits. Application of knowledge gained in various courses to the synthesis, analysis, and design of a system in a particular field of interest selected by student. This is the second of a two-course sequence. Design project proposed in MNE 497 will be completed, and a final report and oral presentation will be made before a panel of judges. This course fulfills University Studies requirement 5A – The Educated and Engaged Citizen: Integrating the UMD Experience: Capstone Study.

Music – MUS 103-01H (14081) ● Introduction to World Music

MWF 9:00-9:50 AM ● Visual and Performing Arts, Room 156 ● Prof. Jamie Eckert

 

3 Credits. In this class, we will explore the musical traditions of various cultures with respect to their historical, social, and cultural backgrounds. We will also explore different approaches to musical organization, musical practice, and significant aspects of style within a world music setting. Historical and contemporary styles of world music studied include reggae, salsa, high life, rock, and calypso. This course fulfills University Studies requirement 3B – The Cultural World: Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding: Visual and Performing Arts.

Physics – PHY 114-02H/02HL/02HR (11572/11573/11574) ● Classical Physics II

MWF 12-12:50pm/W 2-3:50pm/W 1-1:50pm in TBA/TBA/TBA ● Professor Renuka Rajapakse/Professor TBA/ Professor TBA

 

4 Credits. A calculus-based introduction to the concepts of electricity and magnetism. Study of electric and magnetic fields, electric potential, capacitance and inductance, elementary circuits, and electromagnetic oscillations. Laboratory experiments provide students with a solid understanding of basic DC circuit concepts and an introduction to AC circuits. Prerequisite: Honors Program Students Only. Prerequisite: PHY 111 or PHY 113; MTH 152 or MTH 154 or permission of instructor.  This course fulfills University Studies requirement 2A – The Natural World: Scientific Inquiry and Understanding: Science of the Natural World.

Physics – PHY 152-01H (11578) ● Stars, Planets, and the Search for Extraterrestrial Life

TuTh 12:30-1:45pm in TBA ● Professor Alan Hirshfeld

 

3 Credits. Introduction to the science of the Sun and stars - their properties, energy-making processes, formation, and life histories - plus analysis of two societal issues: the viability of solar power (both sunlight and thermonuclear-fusion) as a means of terrestrial energy production; and the question of whether life exists on planets elsewhere in the universe. Prerequisite: Honors Program Students Only.  This course fulfills University Studies requirement 2A – The Natural World: Scientific Inquiry and Understanding: Science of the Natural World or 2B – Science in the Engaged Community.

Physics – PHY 213-02H/02HR (11854/11855) ● Applied Modern Physics

MWF 1:00-1:50pm/Monday 2-2:50pm in TBA/TBA ● Professor Robert Fisher

 

3 Credits. A first course in modern physics designed for engineering and physics students. It deals with light waves, diffraction, interference, and basic matter waves with an introduction to the Schrödinger equation. Basic atomic and nuclear physics is also introduced. Prerequisite: Honors Program Students Only. PHY 112 or PHY 114; MTH 152 or MTH 154; or permission of instructor.

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