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Please be aware that Spring registration for honors students will be opening on the following dates:

  • Monday, November 2, 2020 for students with 100 credits or more;
  • Tuesday, November 3, 2020 for students with 85 to 99.9 earned credits;
  • Wednesday, November 4, 2020, early registration groups, including honors students.

Please register as early as you can to take advantage of the widest range of choice.

Honors Courses Spring 2021

Art History - ARH 105-01H (7881)
Visual Imagery: A Critical Introduction

TuTh 2:00PM-3:15PM
Location: Synchronous Online
Prof. Rebecca Uchill

3 Credits. An introduction to analyzing images and the visual experience. This course focuses on 'reading' visual phenomena (painting, sculpture, photography, film and digital media) in light of the larger cultural forces which shape our interaction with them. 'Case studies' will introduce selected major movements and personalities within the history of art and visual culture. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 3B. Humanities course for CAS students.

Bioengineering - BNG 255-02H (7204)
Biology for Engineers

MWF 1:00PM-1:50PM
Location: Synchronous Online
Prof. Laura Hanzly

3 Credits. Principles of biology at the biology/engineering interface. The course will discuss biological principles that can inform an approach to engineering that is more in harmony with living systems and it will present engineering analyses of the structure and function of human tissue. Topics include an introduction to molecular biology, evolution and design, cell structure and function, the mechanics of tissues, sensing and signal transmission in the nervous system,  biological energy generation and transduction, chemical detoxification and waste handling, and tissue defense mechanisms. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 2B.

English - ENL 102-04H (6490)
Critical Writing and Reading II

MWF 2:00PM-2:50PM
Location: Synchronous Online
Staff

3 Credits. Synthesis-focused course that builds on ENL 101. Students sharpen analytical skills by reading complex texts across public and academic genres. Students also create individual research questions, build college-level research skills, compose sophisticated syntheses, and revise their own argumentative, academic contributions to a defined conversation. Students leave the course prepared for intermediate reading and writing tasks in a broad variety of disciplines as well as with improved research skills and the reflective habits of successful, life-long learners. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1B.

English - ENL 102-35H (6514)
Critical Writing and Reading II

TuTh 11:00AM-12:15PM
Location: Synchronous Online
Staff

3 Credits. Synthesis-focused course that builds on ENL 101. Students sharpen analytical skills by reading complex texts across public and academic genres. Students also create individual research questions, build college-level research skills, compose sophisticated syntheses, and revise their own argumentative, academic contributions to a defined conversation. Students leave the course prepared for intermediate reading and writing tasks in a broad variety of disciplines as well as with improved research skills and the reflective habits of successful, life-long learners. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1B.

English - ENL 200-18H (11998)/FRN 204-01H (6727)
Gender Bending in French Literature

TuTh 9:30AM-10:45AM
Location: Synchronous Online
Prof. Stephanie O'Hara

3 Credits. This course focuses on the theme of gender-bending, mainly in 19th-century French fiction. Several of the authors whose works we will read are now somewhat obscure and no longer read, others are stalwarts of the canon of French literature. All of them had an interest in creating characters who defied gender norms. Whether that interest was financial, artistic, and/or (a)moral is one of several questions this course will address. We will also analyze the culturally and historically specific attitudes toward gender and sexuality as depicted in these works, compared with debates on gender and sexuality in the English and French-speaking worlds today. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 3A.

English - ENL 266-09H (14030)
Technical Communication

TuTh 12:30PM-1:45PM
Location: Synchronous Online
Prof. Karen Gulbrandsen

3 Credits. Introduction to the technical communication skills used in business and industry. Students practice techniques for creating, managing, and presenting information in written, oral, visual, and electronic forms and use a variety of tools to research and collaborate on projects that relate to many audiences, purposes, forms, and formats of technical communication. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 1C.

Finance – FIN 312-04H (7099)
Business Finance

MWF 10:00AM-10:00AM
Location: Synchronous Online
Prof. Zhenzhen Sun

3 Credits. An introduction to the nature of financial management. The course presents the basic tools used in the decision-making process as they pertain to the acquisition, management and financing of current and long-term assets. Working capital policies, the time value of money, capital budgeting and debt and equity financing are discussed. Pre-requisites ACT212 and ECO231 or permission from the instructor.

Honors – HON 201-01B (8025)
Knowing Ourselves: The Good Life

MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM
Location: Synchronous Online
Prof. Jennifer Mulnix

3 Credits. "What is it to live well? This course is designed to explore different responses to this question and to try to understand the nature of the good life. This course surveys historical and contemporary theories of the good life, as well as how these views relate to happiness and morality. The relationship between well-being and political and economic policy will also be examined from both a philosophical and scientific perspective." Fulfills University Studies 4A. Humanities course for CAS students.

Honors – HON 201-02B (12024)
Knowing Ourselves: Sport & Exercise Psychology

MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM
Location: Synchronous Online
Prof. Brian Ayotte

3 Credits. We will discuss how social and psychological variables are related to participation and performance in sport and physical activity, adherence to exercise and rehabilitative regimens, and how such participation (or lack of participation) is associated with health and well-being. As such, this course provides foundational information for individuals interested in coaching, sports medicine, counseling, fitness instruction, and related fields, as well as students who are simply interested in applying these principles to their own lives. Fulfills University Studies 4A. Social Science course for CAS students.

Honors – HON 201-03B (13492)
Knowing Ourselves: The Science of Positive Psychology

MWF 11:00-11:00AM
Location: Synchronous Online
Prof. Mahzad Hojjat

3 Credits. Survey of major topics and theories in positive psychology. A major goal of this course is to stimulate students to explore the scientific and practical implications of positive psychology. Students will be required to read, critique, and propose original research studies. Topics include positive emotions, prosocial behavior, love, and flourishing relationships. An oral presentation is required. This is a blended course. On specified Fridays, there will be no classes. Instead, you will be participating in online discussions and commenting on a posted empirical article. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4A. Social Science course for CAS students.

Honors – HON 202-01B (8029)
Transformative American Ideas: Environmental Racism/Environmental Justice

TuTh 11:00AM-12:15PM
Location: Synchronous Online
Prof. Alexander Menrisky

3 Credits. Exploring the linkages among race/ethnicity and environment is more vital than ever – for the human species as a whole, but especially for underrepresented peoples whose homes and livelihoods stand to lose the most in the face of rising sea levels, warming seasons, and increasingly virulent storms. We will examine the deeply intertwined history of environmental crisis and racial dispossession in the Americas from colonization to the present. Through a wide range of interdisciplinary texts, we will consider how Black and Indigenous writers, artists, activists, scientists, entrepreneurs, and others have wrestled with the asymmetrical burden environmental crisis often places on their communities. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4B. Humanities course for CAS students.

Honors – HON 203-01B (12025)
Creating Global Community: Language and Society

MW 2:00PM-3:15PM
Location: Synchronous Online
Prof. Glaucia Silva

3 Credits. This course will provide an introduction to the study of language in social contexts, exploring the interaction between language and social factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic class. The course will include discussions about the use of language to establish identities, the use of two or more languages (bi/multilingualism), language attitudes, language contact, and language and power. Learners will gain insight into some of the language choices made routinely and how those choices help shape their selves and, at the same time, impact the world around them. Learners will also be introduced to research methodology and will have the opportunity to conduct some basic sociolinguistic research. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4C. Social Science course for CAS students.

Honors – HON 301-01B (7994)
Honors Research Across the Disciplines (Blended Course)

Wednesday 3:30PM-5:10PM
Location: Synchronous Online
Prof. Kristen Sethares

3 Credits. Preparation for Honors thesis or project. Students should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE they plan to begin work on their project. The course explores topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, students will identify their project supervisor and submit their initial project proposal. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4C.

Honors – HON 301-02B (7995)
Honors Research Across the Disciplines (Blended Course)

Monday 3:30PM-5:10PM
Location: Synchronous Online
Prof. Alexander Menrisky

3 Credits. Preparation for Honors thesis or project. Students should take this seminar no later than the semester BEFORE they plan to begin work on their project. The course explores topics such as creative and critical thinking, project and time management, research ethics, and public presentation. By the end of the semester, students will identify their project supervisor and submit their initial project proposal. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 4C.

Honors – HON 490-01 (7996)
Honors Thesis Project I

Independent Study
Prof. Catherine Villanueva Gardner

3 Credits. Research for and preparation of an honors thesis in partial fulfillment of the University Honors Program requirements for graduation as a Commonwealth Scholar, for students whose honors research is multi-disciplinary. In the first semester, the student engages in intensive reading and research appropriate to the thesis or project, culminating in a formal written proposal. During the second semester, the student completes the writing and other preparation of the thesis or project. Students must present their results in an appropriate public forum. Students typically register to continue to complete HON 491, and an intermediate grade of IP can be given in HON 490 until there is a final grade for HON 491 which can then also be applied to HON 490. On the other hand, a final grade can be given at the conclusion of HON 490. Enrollment requires a permission number from the instructor.

Honors – HON 491-01 (7996)
Honors Thesis Project II

Independent Study
Prof. Catherine Villanueva Gardner

3 Credits. Research for and preparation of an honors thesis in partial fulfillment of the University Honors Program requirements for graduation as a Commonwealth Scholar, for students whose honors research is multi-disciplinary. In the first semester, the student engages in intensive reading and research appropriate to the thesis or project, culminating in a formal written proposal. During the second semester, the student completes the writing and other preparation of the thesis or project. Students must present their results in an appropriate public forum. Students typically register to continue to complete HON 491, and an intermediate grade of IP can be given in HON 490 until there is a final grade for HON 491 which can then also be applied to HON 490. On the other hand, a final grade can be given at the conclusion of HON 490. Enrollment requires a permission number from the instructor.

Nursing - NUR 102-04H (12137)
Concepts of the Professional Nursing Role I

Meeting Time: TBD
Location: Synchronous Online
Prof. Lynn D'Esmond

3 Credits. Introduction to the discipline of professional nursing. Learners will examine individual values and beliefs in relation to foundational concepts, including the nursing process, and behaviors that define the discipline. The purpose of course is to build a foundation of self as nurse. The emphasis is placed on socializing the learner as an active, developing professional within the legal and ethical context and dimensions of the discipline. Learners will explore the relationship to self, individuals, families and communities utilizing the art of nursing presence and therapeutic communication. The AACN Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice were used to build this course.

Mechanical Engineering - MNE 280-01H (7336)
Honors Enrichment

Friday 1:00PM-1:50PM
Location: Synchronous Online
Prof. Hangjian Ling

1 Credit. Honors enrichment course supplementing a required sophomore level course in the Mechanical Engineering curriculum. This course is open to honors students who are enrolled in the affiliated required course in the mechanical engineering curriculum. The course provides coverage of more advanced topics and more in-depth analysis of concepts than are covered in the basic class. The course may include lecture and laboratory components at the instructor's discretion.

Mechanical Engineering – MNE 380-01H (7379)
Honors Enrichment

Tuesday 2:00PM-2:50PM
Location: Synchronous Online
Prof. Sankha Bhowmick

1 Credit. Honors enrichment course supplementing a required junior level course in the Mechanical Engineering curriculum. This course is open to honors students who are enrolled in the affiliated required course in the mechanical engineering curriculum. The course provides coverage of more advanced topics and more in-depth analysis of concepts than are covered in the basic class. The course may include lecture and laboratory components at the instructor's discretion.

Mechanical Engineering – MNE 498-02H (7339)
Mechanical Engineering Design Project II

TuTh 2:00PM-3:15PM
Location: Synchronous Online
Prof. Hamed Samandari

2 Credits. Application of knowledge gained in various courses to the synthesis, analysis, and design of a system in a particular field of interest selected by student. This is the second of a two-course sequence. Design project proposed in MNE 497 will be completed, and a final report and oral presentation will be made before a panel of judges. Prerequisite: MNE 497 & 345, MNE Majors Only.

Physics – PHY 114-02H (7325 / 7326 / 7327)
Classical Physics II

Lecture: MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM / Recitation: W 1:00PM-1:50PM / Lab: W 2:00PM-3:50PM
Lecture & Recitation: Synchronous Online / Lab: TBA
Prof. Renuka Rajapakse

4 Credits. A calculus-based introduction to the concepts of electricity and magnetism. Study of electric and magnetic fields, electric potential, capacitance and inductance, elementary circuits, and electromagnetic oscillations. Laboratory experiments provide students with a solid understanding of basic DC circuit concepts and an introduction to AC circuits. Pre-requisite: PHY 111 or PHY 113; MTH 152 or MTH 154 or permission of instructor.

Physics - PHY 152-01H (7331)
Stars, Planets, and the Search for Extraterrestrial Life

TuTh 12:30PM-1:45PM
Location: Synchronous Online
Prof. Alan Hirshfeld

3 Credits. Introduction to the science of the Sun and stars - their properties, energy-making processes, formation, and life histories - plus analysis of two societal issues: the viability of solar power (both sunlight and thermonuclear-fusion) as a means of terrestrial energy production; and the question of whether life exists on planets elsewhere in the universe. Fulfills University Studies Requirement 2A or 2B. Natural Science course for CAS students.

Physics – PHY 213-02H (7473 / 7474)
Applied Modern Physics

Lecture: MWF 1:00PM-1:50PM / Recitation: M 2:00PM-2:50PM
Location: Synchronous Online
Prof. Robert Fisher

3 Credits. A first course in modern physics designed for engineering and physics students. It deals with light waves, diffraction, interference, and basic matter waves with an introduction to the Schrödinger equation. Basic atomic and nuclear physics is also introduced. Pre-requisite: PHY 112 or PHY 114; MTH 152 or MTH 154; or permission of instructor.

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