Margaret Drew

Margaret Drew

Associate Professor

Law School / Faculty

508-985-1126

k_pe_pcr,bpcu>sk_qqb,cbs

UMass School of Law 223


Education

University of Massachusetts BostonBA
Northeastern University School of LawJD
Boston University School of Law LLM Taxation

Teaching

  • Human Rights
  • Domestic Violence
  • Professional Responsibility
  • Practice

Teaching

Courses

This course addresses the lawyer's ethical obligations under the ABA Rules of Professional Conduct. Lawyers are governed by professional rules and are subject to disciplinary sanctions for non-compliance. But the lawyer's duty to act ethically and professionally goes beyond the model rules. In addition to discussion of the ethical behavior demanded, the course will examine the rules of professional conduct and the values and responsibilities promoted through the rules. The course will explore how the rules' ethical requirements interplay with conscience and moral beliefs, and how adherence to the rules can create social, familial and religious dilemmas for attorneys.

This course addresses the lawyer's ethical obligations under the ABA Rules of Professional Conduct. Lawyers are governed by professional rules and are subject to disciplinary sanctions for non-compliance. But the lawyer's duty to act ethically and professionally goes beyond the model rules. In addition to discussion of the ethical behavior demanded, the course will examine the rules of professional conduct and the values and responsibilities promoted through the rules. The course will explore how the rules' ethical requirements interplay with conscience and moral beliefs, and how adherence to the rules can create social, familial and religious dilemmas for attorneys.

Field Placement provides the student with the opportunity to experience the practice of law. Students will work under the supervision of a practicing attorney or judge, gaining practical skills in a real-world setting. Time required at the placement is approximately 10 hours per week (130 hours per semester) for the 3-credit option, and approximately 13 hours per week (170 hours per semester) for the 4-credit option. A weekly seminar permits students to discuss their experiences (while maintaining client confidentiality) and focus on various ethical issues encountered in practice. Class discussions will also address substantive areas of law, skill building, and development of professional identity. Of the 90 credits required for graduation, students are required to earn at least 65 in courses that meet in regularly scheduled class sessions. This course does not count toward the 65 credit requirement. The weekly seminar may be offered as an asynchronous online course.

Field Placement provides the student with the opportunity to experience the practice of law. Students will work under the supervision of a practicing attorney or judge, gaining practical skills in a real-world setting. Time required at the placement is approximately 10 hours per week (130 hours per semester) for the 3-credit option, and approximately 13 hours per week (170 hours per semester) for the 4-credit option. A weekly seminar permits students to discuss their experiences (while maintaining client confidentiality) and focus on various ethical issues encountered in practice. Class discussions will also address substantive areas of law, skill building, and development of professional identity. Of the 90 credits required for graduation, students are required to earn at least 65 in courses that meet in regularly scheduled class sessions. This course does not count toward the 65 credit requirement. The weekly seminar may be offered as an asynchronous online course.

Field Placement provides the student with the opportunity to experience the practice of law. Students will work under the supervision of a practicing attorney or judge, gaining practical skills in a real-world setting. Time required at the placement is approximately 10 hours per week (130 hours per semester) for the 3-credit option, and approximately 13 hours per week (170 hours per semester) for the 4-credit option. A weekly seminar permits students to discuss their experiences (while maintaining client confidentiality) and focus on various ethical issues encountered in practice. Class discussions will also address substantive areas of law, skill building, and development of professional identity. Of the 90 credits required for graduation, students are required to earn at least 65 in courses that meet in regularly scheduled class sessions. This course does not count toward the 65 credit requirement. The weekly seminar may be offered as an asynchronous online course.

Field Placement provides the student with the opportunity to experience the practice of law. Students will work under the supervision of a practicing attorney or judge, gaining practical skills in a real-world setting. Time required at the placement is approximately 10 hours per week (130 hours per semester) for the 3-credit option, and approximately 13 hours per week (170 hours per semester) for the 4-credit option. A weekly seminar permits students to discuss their experiences (while maintaining client confidentiality) and focus on various ethical issues encountered in practice. Class discussions will also address substantive areas of law, skill building, and development of professional identity. Of the 90 credits required for graduation, students are required to earn at least 65 in courses that meet in regularly scheduled class sessions. This course does not count toward the 65 credit requirement. The weekly seminar may be offered as an asynchronous online course.

Legal, historical, sociological, and cultural aspects of battering. Topics include restraining order law and process, criminal law, family law, and torts. Students will also consider the social and legal reform efforts on behalf of battered women, including efforts on the federal level.

Advanced experiential learning experience in which students continue to develop professional skills and identity through a second field placement. The course is designed to combine group as well as individual reflection on the student experiences. The course will include at least fifteen pages of writing as assigned by the professor. The student may not repeat a prior experience unless a waiver is granted by the Director of Clinic and Experiential Learning in consultation with the professor teaching the course. Students are admitted to the course after application and interview. Of the 90 credits required for graduation, students are required to earn at least 65 in courses that meet in regularly scheduled class sessions. This course does not count toward the 65 credit requirement. The weekly seminar may be offered as an asynchronous online course.

Advanced experiential learning experience in which students continue to develop professional skills and identity through a second field placement. The course is designed to combine group as well as individual reflection on the student experiences. The course will include at least fifteen pages of writing as assigned by the professor. The student may not repeat a prior experience unless a waiver is granted by the Director of Clinic and Experiential Learning in consultation with the professor teaching the course. Students are admitted to the course after application and interview. Of the 90 credits required for graduation, students are required to earn at least 65 in courses that meet in regularly scheduled class sessions. This course does not count toward the 65 credit requirement. The weekly seminar may be offered as an asynchronous online course.

Advanced experiential learning experience in which students continue to develop professional skills and identity through a second field placement. The course is designed to combine group as well as individual reflection on the student experiences. The course will include at least fifteen pages of writing as assigned by the professor. The student may not repeat a prior experience unless a waiver is granted by the Director of Clinic and Experiential Learning in consultation with the professor teaching the course. Students are admitted to the course after application and interview. Of the 90 credits required for graduation, students are required to earn at least 65 in courses that meet in regularly scheduled class sessions. This course does not count toward the 65 credit requirement. The weekly seminar may be offered as an asynchronous online course.

Research

Research Interests

  • Gender Violence
  • Trauma and Healing
  • Feminist Jurisprudence
  • Ethics

Professional background

Prior to entering academia full-time in 2005, Professor Drew practiced law in Massachusetts for twenty-five years. She represented clients in the District, Probate and Family and Appellate Courts of Massachusetts. Professor Drew’s practice focused on family, probate and residential real estate. She handled numerous appeals in family law and probate matters.

Professor Drew is a member of several bar associations including the American Bar Association, having served with its Commission of Domestic and Sexual Violence since its founding. Professor Drew is a past chair of the Commission. from whom she recently received a 20/20 Vision Award for her work in implementing the Violence Against Women Act and mobilizing attorneys to represent survivors of domestic violence.  She is a member of the ABA AIDS Coordinating Committee. Professor Drew is a member and past chair of the amicus committee of the National Association of Women Lawyers. Professor Drew is a member of the state bars of Massachusetts, Alabama and Ohio and continues to represent survivors of intimate partner abuse.

Prior to coming to the University of Massachusetts School of Law, Professor Drew taught domestic violence clinics at the University of Alabama Law School, Northeastern University School of Law, and the University of Cincinnati College of Law where she was Director of Clinics and Experiential Learning. 

Professor Drew is co-founder and editor of Human Rights at Home Blog.

Publications

Truth Seeking: The Lenahan Case and the Search for A Human Rights Remedy, St. Louis Law Journal, forthcoming (Spring 2018)

It's Not Complicated: Containing Criminal Law's Influence on the Title IX Process, Tennessee Journal of Race, Gender & Social Justice Volume 6 Fall 2017 Number 2

Collaboration and Intention, Ohio State Journal on Dispute Resolution, Vol. 32 2017 No. 3

Evolution of Law School Clinics  (Book Chapter with Andrew Morriss) BEYOND ELITE LAW: Access to Civil Justice for Americans of Average Means (Cambridge Univ. Press, 2016)

Collaboration and Coercion, Hastings Women's Law Journal, Vol. 24, No. 79, (2013), 1 Irish Law Journal 27 (2012)

Denying  Choice of Forum, An Interference by the Massachusetts Trial Courts with Domestic Violence Victims’ Rights and Safety, Suffolk University Law Review, Vol. 43 (2010)

Do Ask and Do Tell: Rethinking the Lawyer’s Duty to Warn in Domestic Violence Cases (with S. Buel) University of Cincinnati Law Review, Vol. 75, No. 447  (2006) 

Lawyer Malpractice and Domestic Violence: Are we Re-Victimizing Our Clients?
Family Law Quarterly, Vol. 39, p. 7 (2005)

External links

Request edits to your profile