Sarah Malakoff

Assistant Professor

Art & Design

508-999-8559

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College of Visual & Performing Arts 311


Education

1997 School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and Tufts University MFA
1994 Smith College, Northampton, MA BA

Teaching

  • Photography

Biography

Sarah Malakoff‘s large-scale color photographs are examinations of the home and its psychologically charged, uncanny spaces and objects. She has had solo exhibitions at Granary Arts Center, Ephraim, Utah, Camerawork Gallery in Portland, Oregon, The Garner Center for Photograhy and Miller Yezerski Gallery in Boston, Massachusetts, the Vermont Center for Photography in Brattleboro, Vermont, the Sol Mednick Gallery in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester, Massachusetts, and Plane Space in New York, New York. Her photographs have also been shown at The NRW Forum in Dusseldorf, Germany, The Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, Ohio, The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., The DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park, Lincoln, Massachusetts, The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine, among others. She received a 2001 and 2011 Artist’s Fellowship in Photography from the Massachusetts Cultural Council and a 2011 Traveling Fellowship from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. A monograph entitled Sarah Malakoff: Second Nature was published by Charta Art Books in 2013 and includes an introduction by Linda Benedict-Jones, Curator of Photography at the Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh and an essay by Jen Mergel, Senior Curator of Contemporary Art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

“For as long as I can remember, I have had a preoccupation with domestic interiors. As a child, I constantly rearranged the furniture, rugs, and even functions of the rooms in my house. Looking back, it seems to have been an effort to transform my surroundings at a time when not much else was in my power. My long-term photographic project looks at the ways we arrange our most intimate spaces. Our tastes, personalities, quirks and culture are expressed through our décor choices – sometimes intentionally, but often without realizing bits of our most authentic selves have seeped to the surface. These photographs are a collection of private spaces that ask the viewer to imagine the people who inhabit them. We see both the unique ways we live behind closed doors, as well as the universal impulse to control our environment.“

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