Peltz-Steele Speaks, Serves at Political Science Conference

Professor Rick Peltz-Steele attended and spoke at the annual meeting of the New England Political Science Association (NEPSA) in Portland, Maine, in April. He presented in his own research in comparative law and moderated a panel on American politics.

Richard Peltz-Steele's faculty portrait.

 

Professor Rick Peltz-Steele attended and spoke at the annual meeting of the New England Political Science Association (NEPSA) in Portland, Maine, in April.

NEPSA is the oldest regional political science organization in the northeast, founded in 1949.  Its annual meeting rotates through New England cities and annually hosts paper presentations and panels from academics in political science at the undergraduate and graduate levels.  Most presenters hail from New England, but the conference draws participants nationwide.

At the Portland meeting, Professor Peltz-Steele presented his most recent research findings on transparency in the private development sector in Europe, especially in Poland.  Peltz-Steele is working on the project in comparative law with a Polish attorney and academic counterpart, Gaspar Kot, of Jagiellonian University Law School in Kraków.  Their work was presented under the auspices of the NEPSA Public Law Section.

Peltz-Steele also moderated and served as discussant on a paper panel in the American Politics Section.  Papers on the panel investigated electoral politics and voter participation. Presenters included faculty and a doctoral student from Saint Anselm College in New Hampshire, Brown University and Roger Williams University in Rhode Island, and the Community College of Rhode Island.

A broad range of papers and presentations on offer at this year’s NEPSA were featured on Peltz-Steele’s blog, The Savory Tort, in a series of three articles:

“Poli sci papers embrace power plant implosion, populist revolution, and constitutional convention” (April 27)

“Poli sci panels span U.S. con law, Tunisian Arab Spring, Japanese ag reg, Chinese investment in Africa” (April 29)

“Political correctness continues to threaten academic freedom” (April 30)


School of Law, School of Law School of Law Faculty