Heather Turcotte, PhD

Associate Professor

Crime & Justice Studies

Curriculum Vitae

508-999-8744

hturcotte@umassd.edu

Liberal Arts 399I


Education

2008University of California, Santa CruzPhD in Politics (Feminist Studies)
1997The George Washington UniversityBA in International Relations - Africana Studies

Teaching

  • CJS 190 Introduction to Crime and the Justice System
  • CJS 315 Research Methods
  • CJS 345 Environments of Justice/CJS/WGS 321 Women, Crime & the Law
  • CJS/BLS/WGS 380 Abolitionism
  • CJS 400 Capstone/CJS 450 Internship

Teaching

Programs

Teaching

Courses

An in-depth examination of the theoretical formulations, social movement contexts, and political praxes for the study of crime and justice. This will be pursued through a study of abolitionism across a variety of historical contexts and institutional and community settings in order to facilitate incisive critical thought on the most pressing social problems of our time.

An in-depth examination of the theoretical formulations, social movement contexts, and political praxes for the study of crime and justice. This will be pursued through a study of abolitionism across a variety of historical contexts and institutional and community settings in order to facilitate incisive critical thought on the most pressing social problems of our time.

The culminating seminar course for the Black Studies Minor. Students propose, develop and present a scholarly or academically informed creative final project involving one of the Black communities of the region; reflective of their studies in one or more of the social, political, aesthetic, and economic experiences of Black people. Use of academic research, critical reading, and writing skills are required.

The culminating seminar course for the Black Studies Minor. Students propose, develop and present a scholarly or academically informed creative final project involving one of the Black communities of the region; reflective of their studies in one or more of the social, political, aesthetic, and economic experiences of Black people. Use of academic research, critical reading, and writing skills are required.

The culminating seminar course for the Black Studies Minor. Students propose, develop and present a scholarly or academically informed creative final project involving one of the Black communities of the region; reflective of their studies in one or more of the social, political, aesthetic, and economic experiences of Black people. Use of academic research, critical reading, and writing skills are required.

An introduction to both quantitative and qualitative approaches to research design and analysis. The goal of the course is to help students become competent at conducting and critiquing social research.

An introduction to both quantitative and qualitative approaches to research design and analysis. The goal of the course is to help students become competent at conducting and critiquing social research.

An introduction to both quantitative and qualitative approaches to research design and analysis. The goal of the course is to help students become competent at conducting and critiquing social research.

An introduction to both quantitative and qualitative approaches to research design and analysis. The goal of the course is to help students become competent at conducting and critiquing social research.

An historic examination into the political urgencies of transnational environmental justice movements and their studies. This course attends to environmental theories and practices that account for how racism, hetero-sexism, capitalism, and interstate frameworks inform our environments, relationships, and collective struggles for justice and sustainability. Topics include: resource extraction, reproductive justice, immigration, food justice, eco-resistance, legal protections, unnatural disasters, and plant consciousness.

Teaching

Online and Continuing Education Courses

Examines Crime and Justice Studies as a multidisciplinary field of study that bridges criminology, criminal justice, and justice studies. Students engage with a variety of histories, policies, procedures, and politics that inform how crime and justice are constructed within U.S. transnational and intersectional contexts. Areas of analysis include state-making, citizenship, social control, criminality, surveillance and security, war, rights and law, revolution, prison writing, nonviolence, collective justice, and abolitionism.
Register for this course.

Research

Research Interests

  • Africana/American/Critical Ethnic studies
  • Feminist Studies/Critical Legal Studies
  • Geopolitics and International Studies
  • Transnational Justice and Abolitionism
  • Transdisciplinary Methods and Pedagogies

Select publications

Turcotte, Heather M. (2016).
Economies of Conflict: Reflecting on the (Re)Production of 'War Economies
Gender and Development: Critical Engagements in Feminist Theory and Practice, 476-494.

Agathangelou, Anna M., Dana M. Olwan, Tamara L. Spira, and Heather M. Turcotte (2015).
Sexual Divestments from Empire: Women’s Studies, Institutional Feelings, and the “Odious” Machine
Feminist Formations, 27(3), 139-167.

Turcotte, Heather M. (2014).
Feminist Asylums and Acts of Dreaming
Feminist Theory, 15(2), 141-160.

Dr. Heather M. Turcotte is committed to anti-oppressive transnational feminist approaches to decolonizing academia, the interstate system, and daily exchange. Dr. Turcotte is the Executive Editor of the Journal of Feminist Scholarship and is on the Editorial Board of The Feminist Wire Books.

At the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, she is the co-director for the Urban Studies Program with Dr. Erin Krafft, and holds affiliations with Black Studies, Sustainable Studies, and the Department of Women’s & Gender Studies. She is also a Leduc Office for Civic Engagement Service-Learning Faculty Fellow.

Dr. Turcotte’s publications focus on the historical and transnational criminalization of gendered landscapes, the politics of violence, and collective frameworks for justice and abolition. Her publications can be found on Academia and ResearchGate. Dr. Turcotte’s current book project, Petro-Sexual Politics: US Legal Expansions, Geographies of Violence, and the Critique of Justice, is under contract with the University of Georgia Press, Geographies of Justice and Social Transformation Series.

Request edits to your profile