Patrick Cappillino, PhD

Assistant Professor

Chemistry & Biochemistry

Cappillino Research Group

508-910-6639

508-999-9167

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Violette Research 201C


Education

Boston UniversityPhD

Teaching

Programs

Teaching

Courses

A survey of the preparations and reactions of selected representative elements and transition metals. The physical and chemical properties of each element are covered, including its extraction and uses and industrial processes.

A survey of the preparations and reactions of selected representative elements and transition metals. The physical and chemical properties of each element are covered, including its extraction and uses and industrial processes.

Continuation of CHM 401. Lectures on current topics in chemistry from guest lecturers and students. Majors must enroll for two semesters out of four in the junior and senior years.

Synthetic and instrumental techniques currently used by inorganic chemists, including electrolytic, inert atmosphere, tube furnace and organometallic syntheses; ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared and mass spectrometry, magnetic susceptibility determination, as applied to a range of inorganic materials.

Synthetic and instrumental techniques currently used by inorganic chemists, including electrolytic, inert atmosphere, tube furnace and organometallic syntheses; ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared and mass spectrometry, magnetic susceptibility determination, as applied to a range of inorganic materials.

Students will integrate knowledge that they have gained throughout the major and the University Studies curriculum to perform a capstone research project. This will include a lecture component on presenting data in addition to the major laboratory research focus.

Students will integrate knowledge that they have gained throughout the major and the University Studies curriculum to perform a capstone research project. This will include a lecture component on presenting data in addition to the major laboratory research focus.

Lectures on current topics in chemistry from guest lecturers and students. The graduate student will present a total of two seminars, one of which will be the thesis seminar. Each graduate student is required to enroll in this course for each semester in residence. This course will not count toward the 30 credits of course work and research required for the degree.

Lectures on current topics in chemistry from guest lecturers and students. The graduate student will present a total of two seminars, one of which will be the thesis seminar. Each graduate student is required to enroll in this course for each semester in residence. This course will not count toward the 30 credits of course work and research required for the degree.

Lectures on current topics in chemistry from guest lecturers and students. The graduate student will present a total of two seminars, one of which will be the thesis seminar. Each graduate student is required to enroll in this course for each semester in residence. This course will not count toward the 30 credits of course work and research required for the degree.

Patrick Cappillino received his Ph.D. in the areas of bioinorganic and synthetic inorganic chemistry from Boston University. His dissertation work focused on elucidating the important role of iron in oxygen-activating enzymes. He continued his research career as a postdoctoral appointee at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA. There he focused on the synthesis of nanoporous and nanostructured metals, as well as the application of transition metal compounds to electrochemical energy storage. Dr. Cappillino began a faculty post in the Chemistry Department at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth in the Fall of 2014. He has since initiated projects in critical areas of energy research, including grid-scale energy storage and novel materials for electrocatalysis. His areas of expertise include molecular and solid-state inorganic chemistry, meso- and nano-structured materials, electrochemistry, surface chemistry, and bioinorganic chemistry. Cappillino was a recipient of the 2015/16 Electrochemical Society/Toyota Young Investigator Fellowship and was recognized by the Journal of Materials Chemistry in their 2017 Emerging Investigators issue.

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