Cristina Mehrtens

faculty

Cristina Mehrtens

Professor

History

508-999-8303

508-999-8809

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Liberal Arts 331

Teaching

Programs

Teaching

Courses

Freshman seminar focused on helping students in their second semester develop skills related to academic and personal success.  Designated for students who have successfully completed their University Studies 1E requirement but are at risk for academic probation.

Introduces students to historical method and perspective through comparative study of human societies and cultures. The concept of "civilization" is examined in varied contexts through comparisons of social, economic, and political institutions, as well as systems of thought and religion, from pre-history to around 1400.

A requirement for all History majors and minors, this course introduces students to the skills necessary for effective historical study: understanding and analyzing primary and secondary sources; critical thinking; library and research strategies; and historical writing. This course is a prerequisite for all history seminars beginning in 2006-2007, so students should take this course early in their careers.

A comprehensive survey of the pre-Colombian and European-initiated civilizations which developed in regions of the Western Hemisphere colonized by Spain and Portugal. Emphasis is on the independent nations of Latin America from the 1820s to the present. Issues include race and class economic development and dependency, and the legitimation of political authority.

A comprehensive survey of the pre-Colombian and European-initiated civilizations which developed in regions of the Western Hemisphere colonized by Spain and Portugal. Emphasis is on the independent nations of Latin America from the 1820s to the present. Issues include race and class economic development and dependency, and the legitimation of political authority.

Teaching

Online and Continuing Education Courses

Analysis of contemporary historiographies situating women in relation to occupation and the historical implications of gender in the creation, transmission, performance, and representation of women's work. It examines the meaning of female occupations in different cultures as well as gender issues related to the shaping of female leadership. We explore the significance of these projections through writings by and about female professionals.
Register for this course.

A requirement for all History majors and minors, this course introduces students to the skills necessary for effective historical study: understanding and analyzing primary and secondary sources; critical thinking; library and research strategies; and historical writing. This course is a prerequisite for all history seminars beginning in 2006-2007, so students should take this course early in their careers.

Graduate Seminars in history are designed to allow participants to pursue reading and research on a particular historical topic. Course may be repeated with change of topic.

Seminars will be offered variously in topics in non-European World History. The writing of a substantial paper will be required. Content will vary with instructor; may be repeated with change of content. Cross-listed for AAS, JST, and WMS when the content is appropriate.

Introduces students to historical method and perspective through comparative study of human societies and cultures. The concept of "civilization" is examined in varied contexts through comparisons of social, economic, and political institutions, as well as systems of thought and religion, from pre-history to around 1400.
Register for this course.

Topics will be determined by the faculty member and will therefore vary.
Register for this course.