Amy Shapiro Directory portrait

Amy Shapiro

Honors College Director

Honors College

Professor

Psychology

508-910-9051

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Claire T. Carney Library 221

508-910-9051

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Claire T. Carney Library 221

Education

1992Brown UniversityPhD

Teaching

  • General Psychology
  • Memory Errors, False Memory, and Discovered Memory
  • Ethics in Psychological Science

Teaching

Programs

Teaching

Courses

Intensive independent work required to complete an honors APEX. This course partially fulfills the University Honors Program requirements for graduation as a Commonwealth Scholar, culminating in a formal written document and public presentation. Students in this course must submit and APEX contract with their advisor by the add/drop deadline. This course fulfills the required 3 credits of APEX work. 

Continuation of APEX work begun in HON490 or equivalent, in partial fulfillment of the University Honors College requirements for graduation as a Commonwealth Scholar. This course may not be used to finish incomplete work that was expected in HON490 or equivalent course. HON491 is taken to engage in activities specified for the second semester of APEX work in the APEX Contract, or work that was added to the scope of the project after the APEX Contract was approved. All University policies on unfinished work and the assignment of incomplete grades applies. The final grade in this course is unrelated to the final grade in HON490 or equivalent. At the conclusion of HON491 students must present their results in an appropriate public forum to receive credit.

Research

Research interests

  • Epistemology and erroneous belief
  • False memory
  • Educational technology

Dr. Shapiro's work has focused on the cognition underlying memory storage and retrieval in the classroom, laboratory and real world. She has examined the effect of the internet and classroom clickers on learning, the development of false memories and the organization of memory store. Her most recent research explores the personality characteristics and cognitive processes that underlie belief in conspiracy theories and misinformation. She seeks to uncover why it is that people who may use rigorous cognitive strategies in most areas of life employ more error-prone strategies when it comes to certain subjects (e.g., government or vaccines). Her work has been funded by the US Department of Education's IES program and the James S. McDonnell Foundation.

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