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Upcoming Sustainability Courses

Summer 2019

Fall 2019 

 

Previous Semesters

Spring 2019

Winter 2019

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SUMMER 2019

CAS = College of Arts & Sciences Distribution Requirement; SUS = Sustainability Minor Content Area

Where “may be contracted for Sustainability credit” is indicated, students wishing to earn credit toward the minor must agree to choose sustainability-related topics for the course assignments, as appropriate, in consultation with the instructor.

Sustainability (SUS) 101-7101 ● Principles of Sustainability

Professor Robert Darst ● Second 5-Week Session, Online

3 credits. This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of sustainability. We will examine what it means to live and work “sustainably” from the local to the global level, and we will approach these issues from a wide variety of perspectives. Prerequisite: None. University Studies: 4A or 4C. CAS: Social Science.

 

Sustainability (SUS) 350-7101 ● Food, Feast & Famine

Professor Kathryn Caldera ● Second 5-Week Session, Online

3 credits. Throughout human evolution, knowledge about food gathering, food production, and food choices have been an inherent part of individual and cultural sustainability.  Food has always mediated cultural, political, and economic transactions. Paradoxically, while food production has increased dramatically in the last decades, the common citizen is largely ignorant about food systems. Furthermore, food insecurity remains a reality in both the industrialized and non-industrialized worlds. This course addresses these paradoxes as well as the role of food in both sustaining and undermining social and cultural identities. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Economics (ECO) 337-7101 ● Environmental Economics

Professor Sarah Cosgrove ● First 5-Week Session, Online

3 credits. This course will study the fascinating and growing field of environmental and natural resource economics. All the topics covered (e.g., property rights and externalities, regulation and pollution control) will be examined as part of the general focus on the problem of economic growth in the presence of limited environmental and natural resources. We will employ the tools from `basic' microeconomic theory to study the relationship between the economy and the natural environment. Prerequisite: ECO 231. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Political Science 315-7101 ● Public Policy in America

Professor Shannon Jenkins ● Second 5-Week Session, Online

3 credits. Analysis of the policy-making processes, including agenda setting, adoption, implementation, and evaluation. These processes will be examined through the lens of major US policy areas such as education, the environment, and crime and justice policy. Prerequisite: PSC 101 or junior standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Political Science 347-7101 ● Environmental Law

Professor Chad McGuire ● Maymester, Online

3 credits. Introduction to the concepts surrounding environmental law. Students explore the reasons, development, and implementation of environmental laws. Areas of focus include the following: using the law to consider environmental impacts before taking action; using the law to protect water and air quality; the law of land use; and global applications of legal frameworks to deal with large scale environmental problems like climate change. Prerequisite: Junior standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Sociology & Anthropology (SOA) 334-7101 ● Food, Feast & Famine

Professor Kathryn Caldera ● Second 5-Week Session, Online

3 credits. Throughout human evolution, knowledge about food gathering, food production, and food choices have been an inherent part of individual and cultural sustainability.  Food has always mediated cultural, political, and economic transactions. Paradoxically, while food production has increased dramatically in the last decades, the common citizen is largely ignorant about food systems. Furthermore, food insecurity remains a reality in both the industrialized and non-industrialized worlds. This course addresses these paradoxes as well as the role of food in both sustaining and undermining social and cultural identities. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

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FALL 2019

CAS = College of Arts & Sciences Distribution Requirement; SUS = Sustainability Minor Content Area

Where “may be contracted for Sustainability credit” is indicated, students wishing to earn credit toward the minor must agree to choose sustainability-related topics for the course assignments, as appropriate, in consultation with the instructor.

 

Sustainability (SUS) 101 ● Principles of Sustainability

Professor Robert Golder ● TuTh 2:00-3:15 (Section 01)

Professor Jerry Blitefield ● TuTh 12:30-1:45 (Section 03)

3 credits. Fundamental principles of sustainability. The goal is to provide a larger context for topics covered in sustainability courses. Topics covered include: What is Sustainability?, Climate Change and Environmental Challenges, Systems Thinking/Systems Analysis, "Natural" Systems and Function, Human Interactions with Natural Systems, Ethics, and Values. Prerequisite: None. University Studies: 4A or 4C. CAS: Social Science.

 

Sustainability (SUS) 202-01 ● Topics in Sustainability: Sustainable Food

Professor Lydia Silva ● TuTh 11:00-12:15

3 credits. This course takes a whole systems approach to sustainable food production from seed to table. Participants will explore the design of food systems that have the resiliency of natural ecosystems. Students will gain hands-on experience in the Cedar Dell Permaculture Garden and develop designs for sustainable food systems. The essential components of diverse food production systems will be discussed in detail including the environmental, social and economic impacts of sustainable food and farming. Note: SUS 202 may be repeated for credit with a change in topic. Prerequisite: None. University Studies: 4A. CAS: Social Science.

 

Sustainability (SUS) 347 ● Environmental Law

Professor Adrian Lecesne ● TuTh 8:00-9:15

3 credits. Introduction to the concepts surrounding environmental law. Students explore the reasons, development, and implementation of environmental laws. Areas of focus include the following: using the law to consider environmental impacts before taking action; using the law to protect water and air quality; the law of land use; and global applications of legal frameworks to deal with large scale environmental problems like climate change. Prerequisite: None. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Art History (ARH) 357-01 ● Modern Architecture: A Global History

Professor Pamela Karimi ● TuTh 12:30-1:45

3 credits. Survey of modem architecture across the globe, with focus on major movements in architecture from the 19th c. to the end of the 20th c. Major movements and shifts in architectural thinking will be addressed chronologically and across different geographical regions of the world. Prerequisite: None. University Studies: 4C. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Art History (ARH) 390-01 ● Special Topics in Art History: Experiential Museum & Exhibition (contracting required)

Professor Allison Cywin ● Wednesday 6:00-8:30 PM

3 credits. Across the globe, artists and cultural organizations are experimenting with a multitude of emerging technologies to communicate and disseminate ideas, content, and collections that will engage scholars, visitors, and audiences. The course examines emerging technologies within the context of art, museums, cultural and environmental institutions. Students will examine a wide range of experiential interactive exhibition designs and museums principles through the employment of emerging technologies including, immersive & virtual reality, beacon/GPS technologies, augmented reality, mobile technologies, digital curation, digital storytelling, virtual online exhibition, social media and crowdsourcing practices. Students will become knowledgeable of these current technological trends and develop critical skills to assess, and integrate these tools within the sphere of museums, public spaces, and non-profit institutions. Prerequisite: ARH 200 or permission of instructor. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Biology (BIO) 112-01 ● The Ocean Environment

Professor Jefferson Turner ● MWF 8:00-8:50

3 credits. The study of the ocean environment as an integrated ecosystem: the biology of marine organisms and the related physical, chemical, and geological processes of the sea with attention given to the exploitation of marine resources and pollution. Not offered for credit to Biology majors. Prerequisite: None. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Black Studies (BLS) 391-01 ● Topics in African History: Women and Gender in Africa

Professor Bridget Teboh ● TuTh 9:30-10:45

3 credits. In this course we examine gender and power, understood as a set of inequalities, in relation to socioeconomic, political and cultural transformations that shaped the history of modern Africa and women during the nineteenth and twentieth-centuries. Guided by a semi-chronological outline, we discuss the following themes: African gender systems; Institutional and Constitutional rights; gendered impact of colonial conquest; women in politics, economy and anticolonial movements/rebellion; women's challenge to male authorities; female spaces in social and urban areas; gender inequities and debates about feminism in post-colonial Africa. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Black Studies (BLS) 480-02 ● Capstone Seminar in Black Studies: Race, Archaeology, & Injustice

Professor Brian Broadrose ● Wednesday 10:00-11:50 and Friday 11:00-11:50

3 credits. This class considers the intersection of race, archaeology (anthropology), and injustice through an examination of American Indian experiences.  We will study the political and economic role that archaeology has played in legitimating the contemporary moment, how varying scholarly narratives of pastness led to nationalism and racial hierarchies, how notions of American exceptionalism and racism have been embedded within objectively worded history, and how American Indians have responded to disempowerment, neo-colonization, and continued racism. CAS: Social Sciences. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Chemistry (CHM) 130-01 ● Chemistry and the Environment

Professor Smita Bala ● MWF 1:00-1:50

3 credits. Available to anyone in the university, this course provides substantial treatment, with demonstrations, of the chemistry involved in consumer concerns (food additives, medicines, detergents, etc.), air and water pollution, elementary biochemistry, and the general question of power generation and utilization (fuel cells, solar energy conversion, nuclear energy, etc.). No knowledge of chemistry is assumed, but it is hoped the student will have had high school chemistry or its equivalent. Prerequisite: None. University Studies: 2A. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Crime & Justice Studies (CJS) 345-01 ● Environments of Justice

Professor Heather Turcotte ● MWF 12:00-12:50

3 credits. This course examines environmental injustice as developing through the histories of white supremacy, hetero-sexism, gender violence, and class inequality.  Through an engagement with transnational collective movements against capitalism and colonialism, the course centers on the question of what it means to create an environment of justice. Topics of analysis include: colonial and imperial violence, capitalism and war economies, resource extraction and management, environmental racisms, legal geographies and living landscapes, reproductive justice and health, (im)migration, food justice and community farming, decolonization and plant consciousness, green revolutions and eco-resistance, eco-feminism, transnational social movements, and abolitionary environments. Prerequisite: Junior standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Crime & Justice Studies (CJS) 400-02 ● Contemporary Topics in Justice: Race, Archaeology, & Injustice

Professor Brian Broadrose ● Wednesday 10:00-11:50 and Friday 11:00-11:50

3 credits. This class considers the intersection of race, archaeology (anthropology), and injustice through an examination of American Indian experiences.  We will study the political and economic role that archaeology has played in legitimating the contemporary moment, how varying scholarly narratives of pastness led to nationalism and racial hierarchies, how notions of American exceptionalism and racism have been embedded within objectively worded history, and how American Indians have responded to disempowerment, neo-colonization, and continued racism. CAS: Social Sciences. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Economics (ECO) 107 ● Economics of Pollution

Professor Randall Hall ● MWF 12:00-12:50 (Section 01) or MWF 2:00-2:50 (Section 02)

3 credits. Pollution is a basic problem faced by all societies and cultures and the response or lack of response to this problem will certainly shape societies globally.  Because of their inherent externalities, pollution problems can seldom be solved by one nation acting on their own. Through our course’s theories, news articles, and in-class games and simulations, students will discover that the problems and solutions of environmental economics are often best addressed through the lens of the world as a whole. Students will discuss and debate different national, social, and cultural perspectives on pollution and the global environment, and examine the potential role they have as members of a global society. Prerequisite: None. University Studies: 4C. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Economics (ECO) 360-7101 ● Cost-Benefit Analysis

Professor Devon Lynch ● Online

3 credits. Market failures are widespread in societies, resulting in the non-provision of some goods and services deemed desirable to society. Additionally, firms often fail to take into account the negative effects of their actions on the society as a whole. In these situations, government intervention is deemed necessary. Cost-Benefit Analysis (CBA) is a tool used by government agencies to determine the effectiveness of public works projects. CBA is the application of economic, financial and quantitative reasoning tools to issues of resource allocation in public policy. It identifies, quantifies, and aggregates the positive and negative effects (the benefits and costs) associated with a public policy decision. The course will cover applications of CBA to crime, health care, education, transportation, the environment, and other public policies. Prerequisite: ECO 231 or permission of instructor. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Engineering (EGR) 303-01 ● Engineering Economics

Instructor TBD ● TuTh 8:00-9:15

3 credits. Concepts and methods of engineering economics for decision making in engineering. Introduction of common methods of present worth analysis, rate of return, replacement analysis, and decision making under risk. Market evaluation of technology in competitive world markets including technological change, the environment, public goods and governmental trade policies. Prerequisite: Students in the College of Engineering only. University Studies: 4B. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

English (ENL) 200-18 ● Studies in Literature: Literature of Climate Change

Professor Zak Sitter ● MWF 3:00-3:50

3 credits. How do we imagine the unimaginable, confront the unthinkable? This course explores the ways that literature has depicted a world reshaped by the effects of climate change, in the present as well as the not-too-distant future. Combatting, adapting to, and even surviving climate change will require unprecedented acts of individual and collective imagination; how can literature help us to expand our sense of the possible and to understand the implications of our actions (or inaction)? Prerequisite: ENL 102. University Studies: 3A. CAS: Literature. SUS: Arts, Thought, & Media.

 

History (HST) 391-01 ● Topics in African History: Women and Gender in Africa

Professor Bridget Teboh ● TuTh 9:30-10:45

3 credits. In this course we examine gender and power, understood as a set of inequalities, in relation to socioeconomic, political and cultural transformations that shaped the history of modern Africa and women during the nineteenth and twentieth-centuries. Guided by a semi-chronological outline, we discuss the following themes: African gender systems; Institutional and Constitutional rights; gendered impact of colonial conquest; women in politics, economy and anticolonial movements/rebellion; women's challenge to male authorities; female spaces in social and urban areas; gender inequities and debates about feminism in post-colonial Africa. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Management (MGT) 312 ● The Legal Framework of Business

Multiple sections and instructors: see COIN

3 credits. Overview of the legal environment of business. Topics covered include contracts, agency and tort law; labor law; securities law. Students will develop a general background in the major aspects of the law as it affects the daily business environment. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and declared Sustainability Studies minor. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Marine Science (MAR) 110-01 ● Natural Hazards and the Ocean

Professor Wendell Brown ● TuTh 2:00-3:15

3 credits. Natural Hazards & the Ocean is intended to educate students about the roles of the oceans in such natural hazards as hurricanes, earthquakes, global warming, and tsunamis. The course will address student curiosity about these ocean-related hazards, by presenting a conceptual understanding of the relevant underlying ocean-atmosphere, and earth mediated mechanisms. Prerequisite: None. University Studies: 2A. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Marine Science (MAR) 115-7101 ● Introduction to Climate Sciences

Professor Miles Sundermeyer ● Online

3 credits. As part of this course, students will explore a variety of topics, including the effects of acid rain, the greenhouse effect as related to carbon footprint (e.g., the amount of carbon dioxide and other carbon compounds emitted due to the consumption of fossil fuels based on human activity), how warmer air and surface temperatures (brought on by climate change) impact corals and alter coral reef environments, and how global sea level rise might affect our coastal megacities. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2B. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Mechanical Engineering (MNE) 422-01 ● Energy Conversion

Professor Afsoon Amirzadeh Goghari ● MWF 12:00-12:50

3 credits. An introduction to various energy resources, followed by a description of the use of chemical potential energy, nuclear energy and solar energy, the analysis and design criteria for various energy conversion devices, such as generators, transformers, motors, power distribution systems, solar cells, and so on. Understanding of working principles and essential design conditions is emphasized. Prerequisite: MNE 332. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Physics (PHY) 162-01 ● Science, Technology, & Society II: The Environment

Professor John Silva ● MWF 12:00-12:50 PM

3 credits. This course studies current environmental issues and their relations to technological choices. For example, air and water quality are examined in relation to the use of various renewable and non-renewable energy resources. The course is non-mathematical. Prerequisite: None. University Studies: 2B. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Physics (PHY) 171-01 ● Planet Earth I

Professor John Silva ● TuTh 3:30-4:45

3 credits. A course for non-science majors covering Earth's origin and history; composition and structure of its interior, crust, oceans, and atmosphere; plate tectonics and sea floor spreading; seismology, vulcanism and earthquakes; Earth's magnetism; forces shaping Earth's surface, faults and folds, erosion, sedimentation and weathering; and Earth's materials, such as soil, minerals and ores, and igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Prerequisite: None. University Studies: 2A. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Political Science (PSC) 311-7101 ● State Politics (may be contracted for SUS credit)

Professor Shannon Jenkins ● Online

3 credits. An exploration of politics, government, and policy in the American states. The course is a comparative analysis of the 50 states, with a focus on how variations in political arrangements across the states can help us understand difference in policies. Prerequisite: PSC 101 or junior standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Political Science 312-01 ● Massachusetts Politics

Professor Shannon Jenkins ● MWF 9:00-9:50

3 credits. State governments play an active and important role in setting public policy in the United States.  States are leaders in innovation and hotbeds for reforms and have primary responsibility for many policies that directly affect our day to day lives. The state of Massachusetts is no exception, having led the nation in adoption of policies such as gay marriage, solar power promotion, and health care reform. This course examines Massachusetts politics and policy through the study of the political history and institutions of the state, the interactions of these institutions with interest groups, political parties, the public and the media, and the policies that government produces. Additionally, students will complete a service-learning project to help them understand contemporary public policy issues in Massachusetts; they will then propose solutions in a legislative simulation at the end of the semester. Prerequisites: PSC 101 or junior standing or permission of instructor. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Political Science (PSC) 342-7101 ● Public Administration (may be contracted for SUS credit)

Professor John Fobanjong ● Online

3 credits. Examination of the general nature of the bureaucracy in public and private organization and in various cultural contexts. Attention is given to administrative responsibility. Prerequisite: None. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Political Science (PSC) 347-01 ● Environmental Law

Professor Adrian Lecesne ● TuTh 8:00-9:15

3 credits. Introduction to the concepts surrounding environmental law. Students explore the reasons, development, and implementation of environmental laws. Areas of focus include the following: using the law to consider environmental impacts before taking action; using the law to protect water and air quality; the law of land use; and global applications of legal frameworks to deal with large scale environmental problems like climate change. Prerequisite: None. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Political Science (PSC) 385-01 ● The Politics of Global Climate Change

Professor Robert Darst ● TuTh 2:00-3:15

3 credits. This course will address the politics of global climate change from multiple perspectives. We will examine what scientists know and do not know about climate change; the projected impact of climate change upon ecosystems and human well-being around the globe; the distribution of responsibility for climate emissions; the business, politics, and psychology of climate denial; effective climate communication strategies; climate planning across a wide range of organizations and levels of government; and the past, present, and possible future of international climate cooperation. Prerequisites: PSC 161 or SUS 101 or Junior Standing. University Studies: 4C and 5B. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Political Science (PSC) 477-01 ● Seminar in International Relations: Global Environmental Politics

Professor Robert Darst ● Wednesday 3:00-5:30

3 credits. As luck would have it, you were born into one of Earth's rare periods of abrupt climatic change. This development is impressive, to be sure, but not unique: global warming is but the latest chapter in humankind's ever-growing impact on the natural environment, joining a long list that includes the sixth great mass extinction of plant and animal species in Earth's history, the depletion of the planet's ozone layer, desertification, deforestation, toxic chemical contamination, and the creation of a vast continent of floating garbage in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. In this seminar, we will examine the ecological, socioeconomic, and geopolitical causes of a wide range of transnational environmental problems and the causes of success and failure in efforts to address them. Prerequisites: None. CAS: Social Science.

 

Sociology & Anthropology (SOA) 334-01 ● Food, Feast & Famine

Professor Kathryn Caldera ● MWF 12:00-12:50

3 credits. Throughout human evolution, knowledge about food gathering, food production, and food choices have been an inherent part of individual and cultural sustainability.  Food has always mediated cultural, political, and economic transactions. Paradoxically, while food production has increased dramatically in the last decades, the common citizen is largely ignorant about food systems. Furthermore, food insecurity remains a reality in both the industrialized and non-industrialized worlds. This course addresses these paradoxes as well as the role of food in both sustaining and undermining social and cultural identities. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Sociology & Anthropology (SOA) 335-01 ● Environmental Justice

Professor Lisa Maya Knauer ● TuTh 11:00-12:15

3 credits. This class provides an introduction to theories of, and movements for, environmental justice. We will use historical and cross-cultural perspectives to examine how environmental inequalities have affected communities across the globe, and those communities’ responses. Readings will highlight the voices and experiences of peoples affected by environmental injustices. Prerequisite: SOA 101 or SOA 111 or SUS 202 or permission of instructor. University Studies: 1C. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Sociology & Anthropology (SOA) 386-01 ● Sustainability in Action

Professor Rachel Kulick ● TuTh 9:30-10:45

3 credits. This course centers on the frequently used terms "sustainability" and "resiliency" to explore how individuals, groups, and larger communities are actively attempting to create more ecologically, socially, culturally, and economically sustainable systems.  We will pay special attention to the ways that groups attempt to foster justice, equity, and respect for diverse cultures in their everyday practices.  We will look to a variety of media to critically examine expressions of sustainable practices across a wide spectrum including permaculture, urban farming, transition town initiatives, gift economies, and localist movements.  Prerequisite: SOA 101 or SOA 113 or permission of instructor. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Women’s & Gender Studies (WGS) 391-01 ● Topics in African History: Women and Gender in Africa

Professor Bridget Teboh ● TuTh 9:30-10:45

3 credits. In this course we examine gender and power, understood as a set of inequalities, in relation to socioeconomic, political and cultural transformations that shaped the history of modern Africa and women during the nineteenth and twentieth-centuries. Guided by a semi-chronological outline, we discuss the following themes: African gender systems; Institutional and Constitutional rights; gendered impact of colonial conquest; women in politics, economy and anticolonial movements/rebellion; women's challenge to male authorities; female spaces in social and urban areas; gender inequities and debates about feminism in post-colonial Africa. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

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SPRING 2019

NOTE: If the course title is followed by "contracting required," you must arrange with the instructor to apply the course assignments toward an issue or issues related to sustainability. Use the SUS Contracting Proposal Form for this purpose.

 

Sustainability (SUS) 101 ● Principles of Sustainability

Professor Robert Golder ● TuTh 2:00-3:15 (Section 01)

Professor Lydia Silva ● TuTh 9:30-10:45 (Section 02)

Professor Jerrold Blitefield ● TuTh 12:30-1:45 (Section 03)

3 credits. Fundamental principles of sustainability. The goal is to provide a larger context for topics covered in sustainability courses. Topics covered include: What is Sustainability?, Climate Change and Environmental Challenges, Systems Thinking/Systems Analysis, "Natural" Systems and Function, Human Interactions with Natural Systems, Ethics, and Values. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 4A or 4C. CAS: Social Science

 

Sustainability (SUS) 350-01 ● Industrial Design History

Professor Catherine Moran ● Monday 3:00-5:30

3 credits. Ever wonder why your cell phone look the way it does? Did you know touchscreen technology was originally used by air traffic controllers or that Eames’ modern molded plywood chair is connected to treating wounded soldiers in WWII? The theorist Daniel Miller said, “Stuff makes people as much as people make stuff.” This course explores the “stuff” people make as a lens to understanding culture and design. Through an examination of the toys, cars, clothes, consumer products, and everyday objects manufactured from the late 19th C. through modern day, this course will address the way Industrial Design adapts the things we live with to reflect and define our ever-changing modern world. Through a careful examination of objects in historic context, the balance between great design, utility, ecology, sustainability, technical innovation, and commodification reveals not only the story of the object, but the story of humanity. Prerequisite:  SUS 101 or SUS 202. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Sustainability (SUS) 350-02 ● World Religions & Spirituality

Professor Crystal Lubinsky ● MWF 11:00-11:50

3 credits. Study of the religious world, in its historical context, is vital if you want to understand the living cosmos you inhabit, i.e. nature, the invisible world, sacred spaces, and human relationships/events. As in the past and today, religion is central to social and identity-making, as well as politics and economic events, therefore it is a necessity to reflect upon and question religious traditions, laws, and values. This class will engage students in thinking critically about humanity, nature, belief systems, and mythology. Prerequisite: SUS 101 or SUS 202. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Art History (ARH) 390-02 Special Topics in Art History: Architectural History

Professor Anna Dempsey Tuesday 2:00-4:30

3 credits. Description forthcoming. Prerequisite: ARH 200 or permission of instructor. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Art History (ARH) 390-03 Special Topics in Art History: Contemporary Art Theory & Studio Production (contracting required)

Professor Rebecca Uchill Wednesday 12:00-2:50

3 credits. Hybrid-format exploration of contemporary art theory intended to augment studio-driven practices. In class sessions organized under the themes of Sites, Sightings, and Immersions, students will read and write responses to texts about art that takes a position on its own production contexts. Students will move “beyond the proposal” to create final projects. Visiting artist interlocutor Dan Borelli, Director of Exhibitions at the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University, will regularly join class meetings. Prerequisite: ARH 200 or permission of instructor. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Art History (ARH) 470 ● Processing Place

Professor Rebecca Uchill Thursday 3:30-6:30

3 credits. Examination of "land," "site," and "place" in art and cultural production throughout art history of the last half century. From landscapes to environmental art to discourses of "placemaking," this upper-level course will consider a variety of artistic media. Final research projects take the form of "embodied learning" and can include research-based studio projects (with accompanying scholarly papers). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. University Studies: 3B. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Art & Design (AXD) 256 Sculpture: Sustainable 3D Design

Professor Stacy Savage MW 9:00-11:50 AM

3 credits. Upcycling, environmental sculpture, artwork for a sustainable culture. Gather. Risk. Invent. Prerequisites: None. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Art & Design (AXD) 393 ● Sustainable Textiles

Professor Charlotte Hamlin TuTh 12:30-1:45

3 credits. Green/sustainable textile topics. Studio component includes sustainable product development and natural dyes. Topics include issues around sustainable fashion, the global textile industry, and social justice in the arena of textile production, particularly in the developing world. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Bioengineering (BNG) 162 ● Designing a Healthier Planet and its People

Instructor TBA ● TuTh 12:30-1:45

3 credits. An overview of important areas of bioengineering with a focus on how design can benefit all biological systems spanning from the environment and our planet, to the humans that populate the planet. Topics include how chemistry can help improve energy sources and help decrease the effect of human activities on the environment, how engineering design can improve the health and well-being of humans, and how government agencies work to regulate these activities in the U.S. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2B. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Biology (BIO) 314 ● General Ecology

Professor Nancy O’Connor ● MWF 10:00-10:50 and Wednesday 2:00-4:45

4 credits. The principles and practices of the scientific discipline of ecology. Interactions among organisms and between organisms and their environment will be emphasized. Interactions will be described and analyzed at the organismal, population, community, and ecosystem levels. In the laboratory, students will use hypothesis-testing and experimentation to examine theoretical and empirical aspects of ecology. Prerequisites: This course is restricted to Biology majors who have completed BIO 121, 122, 210, and 234. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Biology (BIO) 402 ● Community Ecology

Professor Tara Rajaniemi ● TuTh 11:00-12:15

3 credits. Community ecology seeks to explain patterns in biodiversity: how many species, and which species, are found in a given environment.  Explaining these patterns requires an understanding of how pairs of species interact with each other, how those pairwise interactions scale up to structure larger groups of species, and how species pairs and groups respond to the physical environment.  This course will address these questions by exploring conceptual frameworks of communities, mathematical models, foundational publications in the field, and current research. Prerequisites: This course is restricted to Biology majors who have completed BIO 121, 122, 210, and 234. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEN) 304 ● Introduction to Environmental Engineering

Professor Amir Taghavy ● MWF 11:00-11:50

3 credits. Introduction to the sanitary engineering field. The environmental problems of urbanization and the natural cycle of water are discussed. Elementary hydrology, physical, chemical and biological principles of the treatment of water and wastewater are covered. Municipal services such as water mains, sanitary sewers and storm water drainage, layout and operation of purification and treatment works are studied in detail. In addition, state and federal regulatory standards are introduced and discussed. Prerequisites: CEN 303 and CHM 152; or permission of instructor. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEN) 325 ● Water Resources Engineering

Professor Neil Fennessey ● TuTh 9:30-10:45

3 credits. Elementary surface and groundwater hydrology, pressure flow and open channel flow fundamentals. Topics include basic probability and statistics with a water resources emphasis, watershed based and site drainage concepts, natural and constructed open channel systems, reservoir routing and design, analysis and management issues. Also covered are the analysis and design of pressure flow systems, dam spillways, energy dissipaters and stilling basins. An integrated, systems analyses approach to water resources engineering is emphasized. Prerequisite: CEN 303. Corequisite: CEN 313. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Economics (ECO) 107 ● Economics of Pollution

Professor Randall Hall ● MWF 12:00-12:50 (Section 01) or MWF 2:00-2:50 (Section 02)

3 credits. Pollution is a basic problem faced by all societies and cultures and the response or lack of response to this problem will certainly shape societies globally.  Because of their inherent externalities, pollution problems can seldom be solved by one nation acting on their own. Through our course’s theories, news articles, and in-class games and simulations, students will discover that the problems and solutions of environmental economics are often best addressed through the lens of the world as a whole. Students will discuss and debate different national, social, and cultural perspectives on pollution and the global environment, and examine the potential role they have as members of a global society. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 4C. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Economics (ECO) 443 State & Local Public Economics (contracting required)

Professor Devon Lynch Online, Session 1

3 credits. Explores the major economic decisions of subnational governments—taxation and expenditures—and how these decisions affect the allocation of private resources. Specifically, the course focuses on the constraints imposed on state and local governments that are not placed on the federal government. Prerequisites: ECO 231 & 232, or permission of instructor. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy. Contracting: To earn Sustainability minor credit for this course, you must formally contract with the instructor to apply the course assignments to issues of sustainability.

 

Economics (ECO) 461 ● Urban Economics

Professor Sarah Cosgrove ● Online, Session 1

3 credits. Urban economics is the study of the why and where households and firms choose to locate and the issues that result from these decisions. In this course, we will learn why cities exist and why firms tend to locate near each other. We will also investigate the economics of cities including their sizes, growth patterns, and land-use patterns. Other key topics of discussion will be transportation, crime, and housing in cities. Prerequisites: ECO 231 & 232, or permission of instructor. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

English (ENL) 453-01 ● Professional Writing: Environmental Communication

Professor Anthony Arrigo Wednesday 3:00-5:30

3 credits. This is a writing intensive course geared toward English majors, but is open to any student with the permission of the instructor. This class is for anyone who has an interest in engaging in a deep and thorough reflection on your own life, your impact on the environment, and the environment’s impact on you. Through writing, reflection, research, and personal narrative, this course explores the premise that our perceptions of the natural world are powerfully dictated by visual and verbal communication about the environment within the public sphere, and that those communications influence how we understand, define, and approach nature and the environment. The course will focus primarily on the following questions:1) How have people communicated their ideas about nature and the environment? 2) What are the ways in which language and images influence my own perceptions of Nature? 3) How are environmental problems mediated and defined within the public realm? 4) How do various rhetorical discourses structure my relationship to the environment? 5) What is my own environmental footprint? 6) What is my own environmental history? Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

History (HST) 395 ● World Religions & Spirituality

Professor Crystal Lubinsky ● MWF 11:00-11:50

3 credits. Study of the religious world, in its historical context, is vital if you want to understand the living cosmos you inhabit, i.e. nature, the invisible world, sacred spaces, and human relationships/events. As in the past and today, religion is central to social and identity-making, as well as politics and economic events, therefore it is a necessity to reflect upon and question religious traditions, laws, and values. This class will engage students in thinking critically about humanity, nature, belief systems, and mythology. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Honors (HON) 203 Creating Global Community: The Climate Crisis

Professor Robert Darst MW 9:00-9:50

3 credits. This course addresses the accelerating crisis of global climate change from multiple perspectives. We will examine the projected impact of climate change upon ecosystems and human communities around the globe; the business, politics, and psychology of climate denial; the international distribution of responsibility for and vulnerability to climate change; and the past, present, and possible future of efforts to mitigate the severity of climate change and to adapt to consequences that can no longer be avoided. This class combines face-to-face class meetings on Monday and Wednesday with online exercises and interaction. Prerequisite: Honors Program students only. University Studies: 4C. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Management (MGT) 312 ● The Legal Framework of Business

Multiple sections and instructors: See COIN

3 credits. The highlights of law school in one semester, plus highlights of sustainable business. Topics related to sustainability include: corporations, law-making, how agencies regulate, and how liability is established when people are hurt. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and declared Sustainability Studies minor. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Marine Science (MAR) 105 ● Introductory Ocean Science

Professor Jessica Thomas ● Online, Session 1

3 credits. Essential principles of ocean sciences. This course explores topics such as how the ocean and life in the ocean shape the features of the Earth; the ocean as a major influence on weather and climate; how the ocean supports a great diversity of life and ecosystems; and how the sustainability of ocean resources depends on our understanding of those resources and their potential and limitations. Various examples of ocean instruments used for sampling and measurements are introduced. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2A. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Philosophy (PHL) 300-01 Justice: Race, Class & Gender (contracting required)

Professor Jennifer Mulnix MWF 1:00-1:50

3 credits. This course will examine central social justice issues in American society and evaluate them from various theoretical approaches. Social justice involves promoting a just society in terms of the distribution of wealth, opportunities, and privileges within that society, including challenging inequality and valuing diversity. How are identities, experiences, and structures of race, gender, and class intertwined with social justice in the American context? In this course, students will be encouraged to think critically and expansively about the social world and the conditions of humanity. Prerequisite: Prior course in Philosophy or permission of instructor. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media. Contracting: To earn Sustainability minor credit for this course, you must formally contract with the instructor to apply the course assignments to issues of sustainability.

 

Philosophy (PHL) 307 ● Ecofeminism:  Theory & Practice

Professor Catherine Gardner ● Online, Session 1

3 credits. Study of ecofeminism as systems of oppressions based on race, class, gender, sexuality, and ethnicity that stem from a cultural ideology that enables the oppression of nature. The course explores ecofeminist theories, literature, and practice, including ecofeminist ethics, and the applications of ecofeminism to the lives of individual men and women, as well as cultural institutions and organizations. Prerequisite: WGS 201 OR WGS 101 and permission of instructor OR one course in Philosophy OR permission of the instructor. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Physics (PHY) 162 ● Science, Technology, & Society: The Environment

Professor John Silva ● MWF 12:00-12:50

3 credits. This course studies current environmental issues and their relations to technological choices. For example, air and water quality are examined in relation to the use of various renewable and non-renewable energy resources. The course is non-mathematical. Prerequisites: None. University Studies: 2B. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Physics (PHY) 172-01 ● Planet Earth II

Professor John Silva ● TuTh 3:30-4:45

3 credits. Topics include weathering, mass wasting, groundwater, dug and artesian wells, the hydrologic cycle, mountain development, structure of the ocean floor, shoreline features, coastlines, and the general characteristics of metamorphic, sedimentary and igneous rocks. Students will also engage in weekly laboratory exercises that will produce data and information related to sustainability issues. Prerequisites: None. CAS: Natural Science. SUS: Natural Sciences.

 

Political Science (PSC) 313 ● Urban Politics

Professor David Prentiss ● Online, Session 1

3 credits. An examination of the challenges of addressing issues and getting things done in an urban context. Topics include the dynamics of city politics, policing practices and the nature of the criminal justice system, business environment and strategies for economic development, and public education reform. The course will have a strong focus on the practical politics and real-life experiences of dealing with these issues. Prerequisites: PSC 101 or junior standing or permission of instructor. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Political Science (PSC) 381 ● Topics in International Relations: The Politics of Animals

Professor Robert Darst ● MWF 1:00-1:50

3 credits. Earth's 7.5 billion humans coexist with 20 billion billion other animals. Most of these are members of wild species, but even domesticated animals dwarf the human population: the number of chickens alone exceeds 20 billion. Our fellow Earthlings intersect with our lives and politics in widely divergent ways: some we keep as pets, and some we keep in captivity; some we venerate, and some we eat; some we seek to exterminate, and some we seek to protect. In this course, we will examine the political conflicts that arise from our relationships with other animals. Cases will include the protection of endangered species, whaling, pest eradication, feral animals, animal captivity, genetic engineering, and meat consumption. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Religious Studies (REL) 395 ● World Religions & Spirituality

Professor Crystal Lubinsky ● MWF 11:00-11:50

3 credits. Study of the religious world, in its historical context, is vital if you want to understand the living cosmos you inhabit, i.e. nature, the invisible world, sacred spaces, and human relationships/events. As in the past and today, religion is central to social and identity-making, as well as politics and economic events, therefore it is a necessity to reflect upon and question religious traditions, laws, and values. This class will engage students in thinking critically about humanity, nature, belief systems, and mythology. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

Sociology & Anthropology (SOA) 338 ● Population, Environment, and  Culture

Professor Gloria de Sa MWF 12:00-12:50

3 credits. Explores vital events in human life such as when and who we marry and sometimes divorce, how we pace and stop childbearing, and why and when we die. Fundamental questions include how the adoption of agriculture, changing patterns of disease, industrialization, urbanization, and international migration have shaped the human lifespan, fertility and health. The course will also examine the impact of consumption on environmental degradation and different paths to sustainability. Prerequisite: SOA 101 or SOA 111 or SOA 113 or permission of instructor. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Sociology & Anthropology (SOA) 381 ● Social Impact of Science & Technology 

Professor Jean Robertson ● Online, Session 1

3 credits. It would almost impossible to deny that science and its close cousin, technology, are among the most powerful forces shaping modern social life. The word science itself means knowledge and indeed much of modern Western culture virtually equates science with truth. Closely akin to science is technology. Almost all the conveniences of modern life can be attributed to technology, at least in part; however, this same technology has also scattered families and communities, displaced people, concentrated enormous control into relatively few hands, produced weapons of mass destruction, and may destroy the very natural environment upon which life depends. By examining some of the history, philosophy, and sociology of science and technology, the students can assess their role in government, business, and society. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Urban Studies 201 ● City Life: Introduction to Urban Studies

Professor Ilana Offenberger ● MWF 1:00-1:50

3 credits. This course will introduce you to the ways in which scholars and activists from a range of different disciplines investigate the history, culture and social dynamics of American cities.  We will engage with key debates about how to foster socially just access to resources, opportunities, and quality of life for all urban residents and how to help make our cities of the future environmentally and socially sustainable. It will also introduce you to UMass Dartmouth faculty from across the campus who are working on urban-related research. We will explore various facets of urban life and examine ways to promote the social, cultural, and economic vibrancy of cities in our region as well as in wider national and global contexts. Prerequisite: ENL 101. University Studies: 4B. CAS: Humanities or Social Science (but not both). SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

 

Women’s & Gender Studies (WGS) 307 ● Ecofeminism:  Theory & Practice

Professor Catherine Gardner ● Online, Session 1

3 credits. Study of ecofeminism as systems of oppressions based on race, class, gender, sexuality, and ethnicity that stem from a cultural ideology that enables the oppression of nature. The course explores ecofeminist theories, literature, and practice, including ecofeminist ethics, and the applications of ecofeminism to the lives of individual men and women, as well as cultural institutions and organizations. Prerequisite: WGS 201 OR WGS 101 and permission of instructor OR one course in Philosophy OR permission of the instructor. CAS: Humanities. SUS: Arts, Thought & Media.

 

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WINTER 2019

Political Science (PSC) 347 ● Environmental Law

Professor Chad McGuire ● Online

3 credits. Introduction to the concepts surrounding environmental law. Students explore the reasons, development, and implementation of environmental laws. Areas of focus include the following: using the law to consider environmental impacts before taking action; using the law to protect water and air quality; the law of land use; and global applications of legal frameworks to deal with large scale environmental problems like climate change. Prerequisite: Junior standing. CAS: Social Science. SUS: Economy, Society & Policy.

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