Beste Gucler

Associate Professor

STEM Education & Teacher Development

508-910-6952

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Liberal Arts 396C

Teaching

Programs

Teaching

Courses

The use of current techniques and materials in teaching mathematics in grades 5-9. Using an integrated approach of pedagogy and content special attention will be given to new information technologies, reform-based teaching practices and problem-solving and reasoning. General mathematical concepts are aligned with the academic standards of the Massachusetts curriculum frameworks.

The use of current techniques and materials in teaching mathematics in grades 9-12. Using an integrated approach of pedagogy and content special attention will be given to new information technologies, reform-based teaching practices and problem-solving and reasoning. General mathematical concepts are aligned with the academic standards of the Massachusetts curriculum frameworks.

Developing understanding of student mathematical learning and needs through the completion of mathematical challenges. Each week a new challenge will be set with hints offered at various times. Each challenge will not have a straightforward solution, and the class is expected to develop personal insights into the nature of their mathematical behavior and relate these reflections to practice. An email discussion list and website will facilitate continued inquiry and sharing of ideas outside of class.

This course will introduce students to fundamental problems pertaining to mathematics education that have been instrumental to constitute and define it as a research field The students will be introduced to important ideas in the field and why these ideas are significant in defining the activity of research in mathematics education. The study of how these theoretical and pragmatic problems have been approached by a community of researchers, will help the students to understand, in broad terms, the nature of research in the field and, at the same time, offer a panorama of new areas of inquiry that are being transformed presently, into research programs.

This is a capstone course designed to synthesize critical research processes, theories of learning, and current research themes in mathematics education to which the student is introduced to in their first year. From this synthesis, students are expected to select and refine a topic for their pilot study to be conducted during the introductory and preparatory phases of the doctoral program (Years 1 and 2).

Synthesize critical research processes, theories of learning, and current research themes in STEM Education to which students are introduced in their first year. From this synthesis, students are expected to select and refine a researchable topic for their pilot study to be conducted during the Introductory and Preparatory phases of the doctoral program (Years 1&2).

Theoretical frameworks for STEM education research. Students will focus on the development of a specific set of research tools relevant to the study of reasoning in STEM fields in a variety of contexts, including the analysis of discourse, gesture. flow of interaction, and learning outcomes such as pre¿¿and post-tests of content. Attention will be spent connecting research methods to theoretical frameworks and practical outcomes of analysis. Students will be expected to produce a specific analysis of some classroom data.

Topics not included in the regular offerings of the department. The specific topic is stated when the course is scheduled. May be repeated with change of content. The course satisfies 600-level elective requirements for the Mathematics Education PhD.

An internship conducted at a local research institution, the Kaput Center or at an institution out of state or internationally. Students will be mentored by an adjunct research associate at the host institute to develop their research skills in the field including data collection and analysis, and enhancing their awareness of the complexities of educational research.

Special topics in STEM education. Students will focus on a topic not included in the regular offerings of the department The specific topic is stated when the course is scheduled. The course will require students to engage in reading existing research and engaging in in a project related to that research that may include conducting new research, synthesizing existing research, or other authentic learning activities related to becoming a scholar in the field of STEM education.

Teaching

Online and Continuing Education Courses

Developing understanding of student mathematical learning and needs through the completion of mathematical challenges. Each week a new challenge will be set with hints offered at various times. Each challenge will not have a straightforward solution, and the class is expected to develop personal insights into the nature of their mathematical behavior and relate these reflections to practice. An email discussion list and website will facilitate continued inquiry and sharing of ideas outside of class.
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Dr. Gucler holds a Ph.D. in Mathematics Education with a cognate in Teacher Education from Michigan State University. She joined UMass Dartmouth in 2010 and taught a variety of courses including Calculus for Teachers, Frameworks for Research Analysis, Theories of STEM Learning, Research on Proof and Reasoning, and Thinking and Learning in Mathematics/Science. in K-12 and undergraduate mathematics classrooms. Her general research interests include enhancing mathematical communication in classrooms, conceptual and historical development of mathematical concepts; the teaching and learning of calculus; and the use of technology in mathematics classrooms. She has presented her work in various national and international conferences. She has served as an Interim Academic Director and continues to serve as an Executive Board Member at the Kaput Center for Research and Innovation. She is also a member of the Committee on Assessment in the Mathematical Association of America.

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