Banafsheh Seyedaghazadeh

Banafsheh Seyedaghazadeh, PhD

Assistant Professor

Mechanical Engineering

Fluid-Structure Interactions Research Laboratory

508-999-8567

508-999-8881

_+^de^w^abe=rj^ppa+bar

Science & Engineering 116C

Education

2015University of Massachusetts AmherstPhD
2011University of Tabriz, IranMS
2007University of Tabriz, IranBS

Teaching

  • Fluid Mechanics, MNE 332

Teaching

Programs

Teaching

Courses

Doctoral thesis proposal development based on technical writing process, data interpretation, experimental design. Students who successfully complete the course will be able to assess information from the primary scientific literature, formulate scientific questions (hypotheses), and generate an experimental plan to help validate or nullify their hypothesis. Students will demonstrate a command of oral and written communication skills by completing this course.

Research investigations of a fundamental and/or applied nature defining a topic area and preliminary results for the dissertation proposal undertaken before the student has qualified for EAS 701. With approval of the student's graduate committee, up to 15 credits of EAS 601 may be applied to the 30 credit requirement for dissertation research.

Basic conservation equations in integral and differential forms. Eulerian and Lagrangian description of mass, momentum, and energy. Elements of potential flow. Analysis is primarily limited to inviscid and viscous incompressible fluids with applications to external and internal flows. Discussion of similarity and scaling. Both experimental and CFD laboratories and CFD project are integrated with the course.

Basic conservation equations in integral and differential forms. Eulerian and Lagrangian description of mass, momentum, and energy. Elements of potential flow. Analysis is primarily limited to inviscid and viscous incompressible fluids with applications to external and internal flows. Discussion of similarity and scaling. Both experimental and CFD laboratories and CFD project are integrated with the course.

Basic conservation equations in integral and differential forms. Eulerian and Lagrangian description of mass, momentum, and energy. Elements of potential flow. Analysis is primarily limited to inviscid and viscous incompressible fluids with applications to external and internal flows. Discussion of similarity and scaling. Both experimental and CFD laboratories and CFD project are integrated with the course.

Basic conservation equations in integral and differential forms. Eulerian and Lagrangian description of mass, momentum, and energy. Elements of potential flow. Analysis is primarily limited to inviscid and viscous incompressible fluids with applications to external and internal flows. Discussion of similarity and scaling. Both experimental and CFD laboratories and CFD project are integrated with the course.

Basic conservation equations in integral and differential forms. Eulerian and Lagrangian description of mass, momentum, and energy. Elements of potential flow. Analysis is primarily limited to inviscid and viscous incompressible fluids with applications to external and internal flows. Discussion of similarity and scaling. Both experimental and CFD laboratories and CFD project are integrated with the course.

Visiting professors or members of the faculty present current topics of interest in their areas of expertise.

Independent study under faculty supervision. Intensive literature search culminating in a technical report. Oral presentation at the option of the faculty.

Topical courses not offered in regular course rotation--e.g., new courses not in the catalog, courses by visiting faculty, courses on timely topics, highly specialized courses responding to unique student demand. Conditions and hours to be arranged. Prerequisites: Submission of a proposal, including the course description, goals, deliverables, time allocation and grading procedure; approval by the instructor, department chairperson, department graduate director and college dean.

Research

Research Awards

  • $19,976 2021 Marine Energy Collegiate Competition: Fluid-Structure Interactions Study Of A Dual Turbine Platform Housing Vertical Axis Wind And Current Turbines

Research

Research Interests

  • Fluid-Structure Interactions
  • Flow-Induced Vibration
  • Experimental Fluid Dynamics
  • Vibrations
  • Renewable Energy

Select publications

  • B. Seyed-Aghazadeh, H. Samandari, and R. Abrisham Baf (2020).
    On the Dynamic Response of Flow-Induced Vibration of Nonlinear Structures
    Nonlinear Structures and Systems, 1, 91-94.
  • B. Seyed-Aghazadeh, Y. Modarres-Sadeghi (2019).
    The Effect of Boundary Conditions on Vortex-Induced Vibration of a Fully Submerged Flexible Cylinder
    Experiments in Fluids, 60, 38.
  • B. Benner, B. Seyed-Aghazadeh, D. Carlson, Y. Modarres-Sadeghi (2019).
    Vortex-Induced Vibration of an Airfoil Used in Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines at Various Angles of Attack
    Journal of Fluids and Structures

Dr. Banafsheh Seyed-Aghazadeh is an assistant professor at the Mechanical Engineering department and the director of “Laboratory for Fluid-Structure Interactions Studies (FSI Lab)” at University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Before joining UMassD, was the James R. Myers Endowed assistant professor at Miami University. Dr. Banafsheh Seyed-Aghazadeh is a proud UMass Alumna. She received her PhD from University of Massachusetts Amherst; her master’s and bachelor’s degrees from University of Tabriz, Iran, in Mechanical Engineering. Dr. Banafsheh Seyed-Aghazadeh research focuses on Fluid-Structure Interactions (FSI), which combines fluid dynamics research with ideas on advanced nonlinear dynamics.

FSI has significant implications for a number of physical systems, from aeolian harps to power transmission lines, towing cables, undersea pipelines, drilling risers and mooring lines used to stabilize offshore floating platforms. At FSI lab, Dr. Banafsheh Seyed-Aghazadeh research group works on designing flow-induced vibration-based energy harvesters from external sources available in the environment, such as wind or marine currents. Her research group also works on investigating potentials of combining fundamentals of flow-induced vibration with machine learning algorithms, to lay the foundation for future research projects in the area of biomimetic fluidic sensor design with applications in ocean sensing. Such projects can directly advance the UMass Dartmouth’s role in building the blue economy through initiation of innovative and collaborative research projects at SouthCoast of Massachusetts.

Latest from Banafsheh

Request edits to your profile