Daniel MacDonald - professor - SMAST, College of Engineering, Civil & Environmental Engineering

faculty

Daniel MacDonald, PhD

Professor

SMAST / Estuarine & Ocean Sciences

Professor / Co-Chairperson

Civil & Environmental Engineering

Research Website

508-910-6334

dmacdonald@umassd.edu

School for Marine Science & Technology East, New Bedford 233

508-910-6334

dmacdonald@umassd.edu

Violette Research 107B

Education

2003Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute Joint ProgramPh.D. in Oceanographic Engineering
1996Cornell UniversityM.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering
1992Univeristy of New HampshireB.S.C.E.

Teaching

  • Environmental Fluid Mechanics
  • Pollutant Transport in the Environment
  • Turbulence
  • Wave Mechanics
  • Stratified Flows and Estuarine Dynamics

Teaching

Programs

Teaching

Courses

Final design experience requiring practitioner involvement, student reports, and oral presentations. An interdisciplinary, team approach is emphasized. Course offers two credits in the fall and two credits in the spring. All four credits must be earned within the same academic year.

Final design experience requiring practitioner involvement, student reports, and oral presentations. An interdisciplinary, team approach is emphasized. Course offers two credits in the fall and two credits in the spring. All four credits must be earned within the same academic year.

Thesis research on an experimental or theoretical project in civil and environmental engineering under a faculty advisor. A formal thesis must be submitted to fulfill the course requirements.

Investigations of a fundamental and/or applied nature representing an original contribution to the scholarly research literature of the field. PhD dissertations are often published in refereed journals or presented at major conferences. A written dissertation must be completed in accordance with the rules of the Graduate School and the College of Engineering. Admission to the course is based on successful completion of the PhD comprehensive examination and submission of a formal proposal endorsed by the student's graduate committee and submitted to the EAS Graduate Program Director.

Research

Research activities

  • Investigating the evolution of an advancing river plume front in collaboration with researchers at UMaine and UConn. Specifically, UMassD is focused on turbulence and mixing in the front, with data collected from the UMassD T-REMUS
  • Development of the maximal asymmetric drag wave energy converter (MADWEC), for use in providing at-sea power for moorings, autonomous vehicles and communications.
  • Drone based elevation surveys of Buzzards Bay salt marshes in collaboration with the Buzzards Bay National Estuary Project.
  • Other ongoing research includes use of the UMassD turbulence microstructure equipped autonomous underwater vehicle (T-REMUS) to quantify coastal turbulence in a variety of settings.

Research

Research awards

  • $ 30,000 awarded by Buzzards Bay National Estuary Program | EPA for Use of Unmanned Aerial Systems to Monitor Salt Marsh Loss from Climate Change and Other Factors, Year 3
  • $ 496,876 awarded by Office of Naval Research for UMassD MUST IV: Development of a Remotely Deployable MADWEC Wave energy Conversion System for Utilization with a Sonobuoy Deployed Balloon Communication Package
  • $ 33,308 awarded by Buzzards Bay National Estuary Program | EPA for Use of Unmanned Aerial Systems to Monitor Salt Marsh Loss from Climate Change and Other Factors, Year 2
  • $ 373,048 awarded by Massachusetts Clean Energy Center for Closing the Experience Gap
  • $ 59,549 awarded by EOM OFFSHORE, LLC for Development of a Low Cost, Low Maintenance Maximal Asymmetric Drag Wave Energy Converter (MADWEC)

Research

Research interests

  • Environmental Fluid Mechanics
  • Turbulence and Mixing
  • River Plume Dynamics
  • Marine Renewable Energy
  • Environmental Data Collection with Autonomous Vehicles

Select publications

  • Horner-Devine, A.R., R. D. Hetland, and D. G. MacDonald (2015).
    Mixing and Transport in Coastal River Plumes
    Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics, 47, 569-594.
  • MacDonald, D.G., J.O. Carlson, and L. Goodman (2013).
    On the heterogeneity of shear-stratified turbulence: Observations from a near-field river plume
    Journal of Geophysical Research Oceans, 118, 6223-6237.
  • D.G. MacDonald and F. Chen (2012).
    Enhancement of turbulence through lateral spreading in a stratified-shear flow: Development and assessment of a conceptual model.
    Journal of Geophysical Research Oceans, 117, C05025.

At UMass Dartmouth, Dr. MacDonald leads the Coastal Engineering and Fluid Mechanics Laboratory, which focuses research in a variety of areas related to coastal physics and engineering. Basic and applied research encompasses the areas of stratified hydrodynamics, turbulence and frontal dynamics—with specific emphasis on estuarine flows, river plumes, and industrial discharges. A significant research focus also lies in the area of renewable energy, including wave energy and the hydrodynamic aspects of other marine renewable technologies, and conventional hydropower. He is also actively involved in the utilization of robotic platforms for environmental data acquisition in coastal and inland aquatic environments.

Dr. MacDonald is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and American Geophysical Union.

 

    External links