Lamya Karim

faculty

Lamya Karim, PhD

Associate Professor

Bioengineering

Bone Biomechanics Lab Website

508-999-8560

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Education

2011Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Stony Brook UniversityBE

Teaching

  • Biomechanics
  • Mechanobiology
  • Biomedical Devices

Teaching

Programs

Teaching

Courses

Written presentation of an original research topic in biomedical engineering and biotechnology, which demonstrates the knowledge and capability to conduct independent research. The thesis shall be completed under the supervision of a faculty advisor. An oral examination in defense of the thesis is required.

Investigations of a fundamental and/or applied nature representing an original contribution to the scholarly research literature of the field. PhD dissertations are often published in refereed journals or presented at major conferences. A written dissertation must be completed in accordance with the rules of the Graduate School. Admission to the course is based on successful completion of the PhD comprehensive examination and submission of a formal proposal endorsed by the student's graduate committee and submitted to the appropriate BMEMT Graduate Program Director.

Introduction to the biotransport phenomena in biomanufacturing systems and unit operations. Emphasis is placed on principles and applications of fluid and mass transport processes in bioreactors, cell, tissue and organ systems. Topics include fundamentals of diffusion and mass transport in and out of cells, immobilized catalysts and biofilms; principles and significance of chemical and biochemical reaction kinetics; and fluid and mass transport in pipes and culture vessels, as well as organs and medical and diagnostic devices.

Introduction to the mechanical behavior of biological tissues and systems. Specific topics include: structure and function of biological tissues, mechanical properties of natural and prosthetic materials, and analysis of both rigid body and deformational mechanics applied to biological tissues including bone and soft connective tissues. Basic concepts of deformable body mechanics, including stress and strain analysis, viscoelasticity, muscle action and applications to common problems in orthopedic biomechanics.

Introduction to the mechanical behavior of biological tissues and systems. Specific topics include: structure and function of biological tissues, mechanical properties of natural and prosthetic materials, and analysis of both rigid body and deformational mechanics applied to biological tissues including bone and soft connective tissues. Basic concepts of deformable body mechanics, including stress and strain analysis, viscoelasticity, muscle action and applications to common problems in orthopedic biomechanics.

Research

Research awards

  • $ 41,800 awarded by Massachusetts General Hospital | NIH for Pilot Awards Subproject Fund
  • $ 2,577 awarded by Montana State University for AGE Assessment for Germ Free Study

Research

Research interests

  • Biomechanics
  • Mechanobiology
  • Orthopedics
  • Skeletal aging & osteoporosis
  • Skeletal aging & osteoporosis

Skeletal fragility in patients with type 2 diabetes is a growing public health issue. The prevalence of diabetes is increasing rapidly, and diabetics have three times greater fracture risk compared to non-diabetics. The causes of diabetic skeletal fragility are not well established, which makes it difficult for clinicians to make decisions regarding fracture prevention in this population. Numerous micro-scale changes may contribute to skeletal health issues in these patients. For instance, changes in bone matrix composition due to accumulation of non-enzymatic chemical crosslinks can lead to poor bone quality and in turn deteriorate bone’s mechanical integrity. These crosslinks can also lead to an increase in the formation of micro-scale damage within bone. Further, some patients have altered bone microarchitecture that could contribute to their increased fracture risk, and these microarchitectural changes may result from altered bone cell behavior. Thus, we aim to investigate the biomolecular and cellular mechanisms of skeletal fragility in diabetes and other major clinical conditions. The ultimate goal of our research is to help improve diagnostic methods for fracture risk assessment and clinical management of patients at risk for fracture.