David Rancour

David Rancour, PhD

Associate Professor

Electrical & Computer Engineering

508-999-8466

508-999-8489

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Science & Engineering 214C


Education

1988Purdue UniversityPhD in Electrical Engineering
1982Northeastern UniversityMS in Electrical Engineering
1978University of VermontBS in Electrical Engineering

Teaching

Programs

Teaching

Courses

Introduces and develops basic bread-boarding techniques and circuit construction; acquaints the non-ECE student with measurements using voltmeters, ammeters, oscilloscopes, power supplies, and signal generators; and demonstrates the practical use of some fundamental electronic devices in simple applications. Students use a computer software package to simulate the behavior of the devices and circuits, which have been constructed and tested in the laboratory exercises.

Fundamentals of solid-state electronic devices and the application of these devices to the design of digital circuits. Among the topics covered are MOS and bipolar junction transistors, logic gates and CMOS logic design. Focus is on the design of logic circuits through solving design-oriented problems and the design, implementation, and testing of logic circuits by means of computer simulation software. The course has an integrated laboratory and, in addition, contains a component designed to increase awareness of the dynamic nature of the field.

Fundamentals of solid-state electronic devices and the application of these devices to the design of digital circuits. Among the topics covered are MOS and bipolar junction transistors, logic gates and CMOS logic design. Focus is on the design of logic circuits through solving design-oriented problems and the design, implementation, and testing of logic circuits by means of computer simulation software. The course has an integrated laboratory and, in addition, contains a component designed to increase awareness of the dynamic nature of the field.

Fundamental concepts of analog electronics and the application of these concepts to the design of analog circuits (both discrete and integrated). Among the topics covered are the fundamentals of operational amplifiers, small-signal modeling and linear amplification, single-transistor amplifiers, and multistage amplifiers. Also covered are frequency response, feedback, stability, and oscillators. Focus is on the design of analog circuits through solving design-oriented problems and the design, implementation, and testing of analog circuits by means of computer simulation software. This course has an integrated laboratory.

Fundamental concepts of analog electronics and the application of these concepts to the design of analog circuits (both discrete and integrated). Among the topics covered are the fundamentals of operational amplifiers, small-signal modeling and linear amplification, single-transistor amplifiers, and multistage amplifiers. Also covered are frequency response, feedback, stability, and oscillators. Focus is on the design of analog circuits through solving design-oriented problems and the design, implementation, and testing of analog circuits by means of computer simulation software. This course has an integrated laboratory.

Fundamental concepts of analog electronics and the application of these concepts to the design of analog circuits (both discrete and integrated). Among the topics covered are the fundamentals of operational amplifiers, small-signal modeling and linear amplification, single-transistor amplifiers, and multistage amplifiers. Also covered are frequency response, feedback, stability, and oscillators. Focus is on the design of analog circuits through solving design-oriented problems and the design, implementation, and testing of analog circuits by means of computer simulation software. This course has an integrated laboratory.

Fundamental concepts of analog electronics and the application of these concepts to the design of analog circuits (both discrete and integrated). Among the topics covered are the fundamentals of operational amplifiers, small-signal modeling and linear amplification, single-transistor amplifiers, and multistage amplifiers. Also covered are frequency response, feedback, stability, and oscillators. Focus is on the design of analog circuits through solving design-oriented problems and the design, implementation, and testing of analog circuits by means of computer simulation software. This course has an integrated laboratory.

Introduction to design of Very Large Scale Integrated Circuits (VLSI), taught at the transistor level. Computer tools are used to create and simulate integrated circuit layouts. Levels of design automation covered include Full Custom layout, Schematic Driven layout, Standard Cells and fully automated synthesis of HDL code. Students are required to complete a project that can be submitted for fabrication.

Introduction to the design of CMOS analog integrated circuits (ICs), with occasional references to bipolar IC's to make comparisons. Students are required to complete the design of a reasonably complex IC and make a class presentation of its design methodology and simulation results.

Introduction to the design of CMOS analog integrated circuits (ICs), with occasional references to bipolar IC's to make comparisons. Students are required to complete the design of a reasonably complex IC and make a class presentation of its design methodology and simulation results.

Research

Research Interests

  • Quantum Mechanics
  • Solid State Devices
  • VLSI

Dr. David P. Rancour is Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. He has a B.S. in Electrical Engineering (Computer Engineering option) from the University of Vermont, an M.S. in Electrical Engineering (E/M fields and Digital Signal Processing) from Northeastern University, and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering (Solid State Devices & Materials) from Purdue University.

Dr. Rancour’s research interests have centered on defects in semiconductors. He has recently developed a theoretical model for a new defect characterization technique. Computer simulations show the new method to be more than 1000 times more sensitive than the standard technique. He has investigated defects in Gallium Arsenide epitaxial thin films, and has served as a consultant to M/A-COM, Inc., Burlington Semiconductor Operations, conducting defect characterization experiments on silicon PIN diodes.

As a United States Air Force officer, Dr. Rancour managed the engineering portions of an Air Force procurement contract for a ground based radar system. He was responsible for controls/displays and computer hardware. He also assisted in the design, fabrication, and testing of a TTL-based Optical Mark Reader for an Air Force research laboratory. Dr. Rancour has designed LCD fuel gauge display layouts for Simmonds Precision, and he has fabricated and tested a TTL-based wafer stepper interface for IBM.

Dr. Rancour is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Electron Devices Society.

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