Dayalan P. Kasilingam

Dayalan Kasilingam, PhD

Professor

Electrical & Computer Engineering

508-999-8534

508-999-8489

dkasilingam@umassd.edu

Science & Engineering 213C

Education

1987California Institute of TechnologyPhD in Electrical Engineering
1982California Institute of TechnologyMS in Electrical Engineering
1981Cambridge University, UKBA in Electrical Sciences

Teaching

Programs

Teaching

Courses

The first course covering basic theory of circuit analysis. The goals of this course include developing an ability to solve engineering problems and to design, implement and test circuits to meet design specifications. Topics include network theorems, review of techniques to solve simultaneous equations, nodal and mesh circuit analysis, dependent sources, Thevenin's and Norton's equivalent circuits, solution of first and second order networks to switched DC inputs, and natural responses. Group classroom and project activities require design, simulation, implementation and measurement of practical circuits. Written reports of project results are required.

The first course covering basic theory of circuit analysis. The goals of this course include developing an ability to solve engineering problems and to design, implement and test circuits to meet design specifications. Topics include network theorems, review of techniques to solve simultaneous equations, nodal and mesh circuit analysis, dependent sources, Thevenin's and Norton's equivalent circuits, solution of first and second order networks to switched DC inputs, and natural responses. Group classroom and project activities require design, simulation, implementation and measurement of practical circuits. Written reports of project results are required.

The first course covering basic theory of circuit analysis. The goals of this course include developing an ability to solve engineering problems and to design, implement and test circuits to meet design specifications. Topics include network theorems, review of techniques to solve simultaneous equations, nodal and mesh circuit analysis, dependent sources, Thevenin's and Norton's equivalent circuits, solution of first and second order networks to switched DC inputs, and natural responses. Group classroom and project activities require design, simulation, implementation and measurement of practical circuits. Written reports of project results are required.

The first course covering basic theory of circuit analysis. The goals of this course include developing an ability to solve engineering problems and to design, implement and test circuits to meet design specifications. Topics include network theorems, review of techniques to solve simultaneous equations, nodal and mesh circuit analysis, dependent sources, Thevenin's and Norton's equivalent circuits, solution of first and second order networks to switched DC inputs, and natural responses. Group classroom and project activities require design, simulation, implementation and measurement of practical circuits. Written reports of project results are required.

The first course covering basic theory of circuit analysis. The goals of this course include developing an ability to solve engineering problems and to design, implement and test circuits to meet design specifications. Topics include network theorems, review of techniques to solve simultaneous equations, nodal and mesh circuit analysis, dependent sources, Thevenin's and Norton's equivalent circuits, solution of first and second order networks to switched DC inputs, and natural responses. Group classroom and project activities require design, simulation, implementation and measurement of practical circuits. Written reports of project results are required.

The first course covering basic theory of circuit analysis. The goals of this course include developing an ability to solve engineering problems and to design, implement and test circuits to meet design specifications. Topics include network theorems, review of techniques to solve simultaneous equations, nodal and mesh circuit analysis, dependent sources, Thevenin's and Norton's equivalent circuits, solution of first and second order networks to switched DC inputs, and natural responses. Group classroom and project activities require design, simulation, implementation and measurement of practical circuits. Written reports of project results are required.

Fundamentals of time-invariant electric and magnetic fields and time-varying electromagnetic fields leading to general Maxwell's equations. Topics include the electromagnetic model, vector calculus, electrostatic fields, steady electric currents, magnetostatic fields, electromagnetic induction, slowly time-varying electromagnetic fields, and Maxwell's equations in integral and differential form; solutions of Maxwell's equations in the presence of boundary conditions are presented. Maxwell's equations in complex domain are introduced and utilized. Circuit theory and its relationship to electromagnetics is presented as an approximate form of Maxwell's equations. Numerical techniques for field computation are introduced.

Fundamentals of electromagnetic waves, propagation, and radiation as a continuation of ECE 335. The course reviews general Maxwell's equations in integral and differential form, and electromagnetic boundary conditions. Poynting's theorem and Lorentz potentials are studied. Topics include the propagation of uniform plane electromagnetic waves in free space and in various media (including wave reflection and refraction, and skin effect), transmission-line theory using frequency- and time-domain analysis, analysis of waveguides and electromagnetic resonators, and fundamentals of radiation and antennas. Numerical techniques for radiation and scattering are introduced. Two laboratory experiments on transmission lines and waveguides are performed.

Topics of timely interest in electrical and computer engineering. Course content may change from year to year according to instructor's preferences.

Principles and applications of active remote sensing techniques. Course focuses on microwave and millimeter wave radar techniques. Topics include radar equation, detection theory, scattering from targets and natural surfaces, and imaging systems. The following sensors are covered: synthetic aperture radar (SAR), radar scatterometers, altimeters, polarimetric radars and interferometric radars. Applications include ocean wave and wind measurements, soil moisture measurements, biomass measurements, measurement of land topography, and precipitation studies. Course also includes laboratory computer exercises for analyzing and processing real sensor data.

Research

Research Interests

  • Adaptive signal processing
  • Applied Electromagnetics
  • Remote Sensing
  • Wireless Communications

Dr. Dayalan Kasilingam received the B.A. degree in electrical sciences from the University of Cambridge, Cambridge, U.K., in 1981 and the M.S.E.E. and Ph.D. degrees from the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, in 1982 and 1987, respectively. From 1987 to 1992, he was the Senior Research Scientist with Ocean Research and Engineering, Pasadena, where he developed numerous techniques for analyzing and retrieving information from synthetic aperture radar images of the ocean surface. In January 1993, Dr. Kasilingam joined the department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Dr. Kasilingam’s research interest is in radar remote sensing and applied electromagnetics. He received the prestigious Faculty Early Career Development Grant from the National Science Foundation in 1995. He has also been awarded research grants from the Office of Naval Research and NASA. From September 2005 through May 2014, he was the Chairperson of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Dr. Kasilingam has also performed sabbaticals at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in Washington, DC, and at the Center for Remote Imaging, Sensing and Processing at the National University of Singapore (NUS).

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