Photograph of Haiping Xu

Haiping Xu, PhD

Professor / Chairperson

Computer & Information Science

508-910-6427

508-999-9144

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Dion 302G

Education

2003University of Illinois at ChicagoPhD in Computer Science
1998Wright State UniversityMS in Computer Science
1989Zhejiang University, ChinaBS in Electrical Engineering

Teaching

Programs

Teaching

Courses

Theoretical basis of the development of computer science. The course details particular formalisms used in the design of hardware and software systems. Intrinsic limitations of computation are described. Advanced topics of automata theory and analysis of algorithms are included. The course also covers Turing machines, the halting problem, models of computation, intractable computations, polynomial reductions, P vs. NP, parallel algorithms, various formal descriptions and specifications of programs and computations, and proofs of program correctness and interactive proof systems.

Prerequisite: Completion of three core courses. Research leading to submission of a formal thesis. This course provides a thesis experience, which offers a student the opportunity to work on a comprehensive research topic in the area of computer science in a scientific manner. Topic to be agreed in consultation with a supervisor. A written thesis must be completed in accordance with the rules of the Graduate School and the College of Engineering. Graded A-F.

Prerequisite: Completion of three core courses. Research leading to submission of a formal thesis. This course provides a thesis experience, which offers a student the opportunity to work on a comprehensive research topic in the area of computer science in a scientific manner. Topic to be agreed in consultation with a supervisor. A written thesis must be completed in accordance with the rules of the Graduate School and the College of Engineering. Graded A-F.

Research investigations of a fundamental and/or applied nature defining a topic area and preliminary results for the dissertation proposal undertaken before the student has qualified for EAS 701. With approval of the student's graduate committee, up to 15 credits of EAS 601 may be applied to the 30 credit requirement for dissertation research.

Research

Research interests

  • Electronic Commerce, Internet Security, Web Services
  • Formal Methods, Model-Based Software Development
  • Mobile Agent Systems, Wireless Sensor Networks
  • Multi-Agent Systems (MAS), Intelligent Agents
  • Peer-to-Peer (P2P) Computing, Ubiquitous Computing

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