School for Marine Science and Technology saluted for research

The four-year-old School for Marine Science and Technology of the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth was saluted at a private luncheon Monday with a gift of $50,000 and words of praise from U.S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy , among others

School for Marine Science and Technology saluted for research 

The four-year-old School for Marine Science and Technology of the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth was saluted at a private luncheon Monday with a gift of $50,000 and words of praise from U.S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy , among others. 

Harvey Mickelson, general counsel for the American Scallop Association , said the gift was a show of support for SMAST's scientific research that benefits not only the fishing industry, but 
conservation efforts as well. SMAST is doing research that is consistent with scientific principles. It does not just help the scallop fisheries, but establishes a new arena for our basic understanding of the ocean, he said. 

Mickelson said the money was contributed by members of the scallop industry who want to support the school's development as a world-class graduate school and research institute. 

The luncheon was hosted at SMAST by Maritime International, Inc., whose president, David Wechsler, said he wanted to acknowledge the scallop industry donation because it shows how well the fishing industry responds to university research that is funded by government resources. It's important to catch people doing something right, and acknowledge them This is a unique triangulation that is working extremely well supporting the three legs of the triangle--government, university research, and the fishing industry. 

Wechsler invited scallop harvesters and processors, legislative and other political figures as well as the SMAST scientists to the 
luncheon that was held in a tent on SMAST grounds. 

SMAST dean, Dr. Brian Rothschild, said the support is a very positive sign that the marine community recognizes the work SMAST is doing to focus on the needs of the coastal region that includes New Bedford. The opening of the scallop beds is just one example of how the cooperative relationship that exists here benefits everyone. We especially want to thank Harvey Mickelson and Senator Kennedy for their continued support of SMAST's research. 

SMAST research, directed by Dr. Kevin Stokesbury in the closed scallop beds in the Georges Banks, revealed compelling evidence that tons of scallops were lying on the ocean floor, in such dense concentrations that some apparently had suffocated. The fishing ban was lifted , and last year, according to the National Marine Fisheries Services preliminary reports, New Bedford scallopers landed 15.7 million pounds of scallops worth $82.7 million. 

The School for Marine Science and Technology at UMass Dartmouth is both a research laboratory, opened in 1997, and a graduate school, established in 2000, which conducts multidisciplinary research in acoustic and optic engineering, physical oceanography, marine biology, physics, and biogeochemistry. SMAST's expertise transcends 
traditional disciplinary boundaries to explore and develop ocean prediction and monitoring systems, fishery management science, advanced aquaculture systems, coastal zone systems, acoustics, remote sensing, and ocean engineering. SMAST directs its primary research in the deep oceans, coastal and estuarine waters of New England, as well as toward developing sound public policy in fisheries and environmental management.


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